Tango Enigmático

 

2020-02-26 - Tango Enigmatico BNE 5 May 2019

There’s a report on Tango Enigmático‘s second outing, we check out What’s On for tango around the region, and the singer Carlos Dante features.   That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit:  Ann Smith. Tango Enigmático bringing the new and the old together last year; they were joined by Tango Paradiso singer Marina Varney at The Glasshouse, Brisbane, on 5 May 2019. Check out a preview here.

PLAYLIST:

  • El Criollito Oriental, meaning ‘Kid From Uruguay’; recorded by Pedro Laurenz on 1 March 1944; a milonga with music composed by Alberto Mastra, lyrics by Alberto Mastra, and sung by Alberto Podestá. Uruguay was the most eastern of the provinces of the Spanish Empire in South America and its official name is the Oriental Republic of Uruguay. The title of the song more accurately translates as ‘The Young Man Of Uruguay’.
  • Mocosita, meaning ‘Young Girl’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 20 April 1949; a tango with music composed by Gerardo Matos Rodríguez in 1926, lyrics by Victor Soliño, and sung by Carlos Dante. Meaning ‘brat’, the title is a term of endearment for a young girl, although it all ends badly for the payador who loves her.
  • Engominado, meaning ‘Pimped’; recorded by Juan D’Arienzo in 1928; a tango with music composed by Fernando Montoni, first recorded in 1928, lyrics by Maximo José Orsi, and sung by Carlos Dante. Literally meaning ‘Gummed’, in reference to the brilliantine hair pomade worn by young men in the early part of the 20th century; ‘Pimped’ is more meaningful in the 21st century.
  • El Carrerito, meaning ‘The Carter’; recorded by Rafael Canaro in 1929; a tango with music composed by Raúl Joaquín De Los Hoyos in 1928, lyrics by Alberto Vacarezza, and sung by Carlos Dante.
  • Soñar Y Nada Más, meaning ‘To Dream And Nothing More’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 29 August 1944; a vals with music composed by Francisco Canaro, first recorded in 1943, lyrics by Ivo Pelay, and sung by Carlos Dante and Julio Martel.
  • Soy Un Arlequin, meaning ‘I Am A Harlequin’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 11 September 1945; a tango with music composed by Enrique Santos Discépolo in 1928, lyrics by Enrique Santos Discépolo, and sung by Carlos Dante.
  • Immensidad, meaning ‘Immensity’; recorded live from a performance by Tango Enigmático at The Glasshouse, Brisbane on 5 May 2019; a concierto with music composed by Exequiel Mantega.
  • Hecho Por Mano, meaning ‘Made By Hand’; recorded live from a performance by Tango Enigmático at The Glasshouse, Brisbane on 5 May 2019; a concierto with music composed by Owen Salome. Written in rural Victoria and urban Buenos Aires by Australian composer Owen Salome.
  • La Puñalada, meaning ‘The Knife-stabbing’; recorded live from a performance by Tango Enigmático at The Glasshouse, Brisbane on 5 May 2019; a milonga with music composed by Pintín Castellanos in 1933 and lyrics by Celadonio Flores
  •  A Evaristo Carriego; recorded live from a performance by Tango Enigmático at The Glasshouse, Brisbane on 5 May 2019; a concierto with music composed by Eduardo Rovira, first recorded in 1969. The name is a reference to Evaristo Carriego, the nationalist Argentine poet who also influenced tango lyrics.

 

Carlos Acuña

2020-02-13 - Carlos Acuna

Think tango singer and the conversational canción of Carlos Gardel or of Roberto Goyeneche may come to mind and of course the majority of female singers performed this genre. Or perhaps it was the tango bailable of Alberto Podestá or Alberto Castillo that came to mind. While the majority of tango singers specialised in one or other genre, Carlos Acuña was comfortable working in both. Last edition took a brief look at his life and this edition explores their recording legacy in more detail. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit: http://humilitan.blogspot.com/search/label/Carlos%20Acu%C3%B1a

PLAYLIST:

  • Cuando El Amor Muere, meaning ‘When Love Dies’, and also known as ‘When Love Dies’; recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 2 August 1941; a tango with music composed by Alfredo Malerba in 1941, lyrics by Héctor Marcó, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Adiós Te Vas, meaning ‘Goodbye’, and also known as ‘Goodbye’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 24 August 1943; a tango with music composed by Egidio Pittaluga, lyrics by Cátulo Castillo, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Barrio Reo, from lunfardo, meaning ‘Humble Neighbourhood’, and also known as ‘Humble Neighbourhood’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 29 April 1943; a tango with music composed by Roberto Fugazot in 1927, lyrics by Alfredo Navarrine, and sung by Carlos Acuña. The name is a reference to the suburb or neighbourhood in which the singer grew up.
  • Canción De Rango, meaning ‘Song Of The Range’, and also known as ‘Pa’ Que Se Callen’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 29 April 1943; a tango with music composed by Raúl Kaplún, first recorded in 1942, lyrics by José María Suñe, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Soy Del Noventa , meaning ‘I Am Of The 90s’, and also known as ‘Soy Del 90’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 8 July 1943; a milonga with music composed by Tito Ribero, lyrics by Carlos Waiss, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Lonjazos , from lunfardo; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 7 December 1943; a tango with music composed by Andrés Domenech in 1932, lyrics by Jesús Fernández Blanco, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Yo Tengo Un Puñal, meaning ‘I Have A Knife’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 3 March 1943; a tango with music composed by Luís Moresco, lyrics by José Demetrio Terragno, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Sosiego En La Noche, meaning ‘Peace In The Night’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 30 May 1944; a tango with music composed by Roverto Garza in 1943, lyrics by Carlos Bahr, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • A Suerte Y Verdad, meaning ‘To Luck And Truth’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 11 August 1944; a tango with music composed by Carlos M Parodi, lyrics by Carlos Waiss, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Tu Voz, meaning ‘Your Voice’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 9 May 1944; a tango with music composed by Juan Antonio Migliore, lyrics by Fermin Carballeda, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Sueño De Juventud, meaning ‘Dreams Of Youth’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 11 April 1944; a vals with music composed by Enrique Santos Discépolo in 1931, lyrics by Enrique Santos Discépolo, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Cada Vez Que Mi Recuerdes, meaning ‘Every Time You Remember’; recorded by Mariano Mores on 8 April 1957; a tango with music composed by Mariano Mores , first recorded in 1943, lyrics by José María Contursi, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Lejana Tierra Mía, meaning ‘My Land Afar’; recorded by Mariano Mores on 16 January 1960; a tango with music composed by Carlos Gardel, first recorded in 1935, lyrics by Alfredo Le Pera, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • La Canción, meaning ‘The Song’, and also known as ‘Flor de mburucuyá’; recorded by Mariano Mores on 16 January 1960; a tango with music composed by Juan de Dios Filiberto, first recorded in 1959, lyrics by Lito Bayardo, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Mulatada; recorded by Mariano Mores on 11 August 1958; a candombe with music composed by Mariano Mores , lyrics by Cátulo Castillo, and sung by Carlos Acuña and Aldo Campoamor. The name is a reference to Afro-Argentine music.
  • La Flor De Canela, meaning ‘Cinnamon Flower’; recorded by Mariano Mores on 11 August 1958; a vals with music composed by Isabel Granda, first recorded in 1957, lyrics by Isabel Granda, and sung by Carlos Acuña and Aldo Campoamor.
  • El Día Que Me Quieras, meaning ‘The Day That You Love Me’; recorded by Mariano Mores on 20 January 1970; a tango with music composed by Carlos Gardel in 1935, lyrics by Alfredo Le Pera, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Mi Buenos Aires Querido, meaning ‘My Beloved Buenos Aires’;; a tango with music composed by Carlos Gardel in 1934, lyrics by Alfredo Le Pera, and sung by Carlos Acuña.   Acuña recorded this song as early as 1962, but not with Mariano Mores orquesta. Given the orchestral backing this version may be recorded by Martin Darré and his orchestra in Spain some time in the 1970s or 1980s.

Melbourne Tango Orquesta

2020-02-07 - MTO in concert at the Paris Cat, Melbourne, on 1 February 2020

Marking a new milestone in the emergence of tango music here, Australia’s first permanent tango orquesta started performing in 2018, and this edition includes a report on the Melbourne Tango Orquesta kicking off 2020 at the Paris Cat. The singing of Carlos Acuña features, and there’s a round-up of What’s On. It’s all on here, this Sunday, on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit: Ann Smith; The Melbourne Tango Orquesta on stage at the Paris Cat, Melbourne, on 1 February 2020.

Once upon a time in Australia there were ensembles called ‘tango bands’. They generally included musicians from Italy, perhaps Spain, and they played dance music of many styles—except Argentine Tango. It was the 1940s, the 1950s, and in an Australia still under the White Australia policy, ‘tango band’ was pejorative; in an Anglophile culture the term simply separated the Australian musicians from the immigrants. Fast-forward to the 21st century, to an Australia that includes immigrants from every other country in the world*, and the musical influences on young musicians are reflecting that diversity. Tango music is developing through a healthy interchange of musicians between ensembles in the Eastern mainland states, and the emergence of the Melbourne Tango Orquesta marks the growing maturity of the tango genre in Australia.

The development of tango music in Australia mirrors some aspects of the development of tango in Argentina a century earlier. At first the ensembles were small; in Argentina initially there were only 3 or 4 musicians, but the sextet was established by 1911. A century later in Australia the early ensembles were similarly small. The ‘Tango 22’ CD release recorded tango bailable from a duo in Perth in 2001, and Cambalache was a Sydney-based duo a decade later; Libertango Trio was Sydney-based, as were the quartets Tangocentric and Tango Bar, and there was an electro/dub tango quartet in Melbourne; the quintet Collectivo 29 formed in Melbourne, Fuego Blanco and Tángalo formed quintets in Sydney; while Tango Paradiso from Queensland varied up to a sextet formation and Los Jovenes Del Tango was a Canberra-based sextet.

But during the Golden Age orquestas emerged with 10 to 20 musicians, and for dancing tango nothing beats the dynamic range that is only possible with an orquesta. In Australia three orquestas have emerged. The earliest is Tango Oz but while it has been developing tango musicians through an orquesta formation since 2009, it is primarily a youth teaching orquesta with constant turnover of young musicians and only sporadic public performances. Sadly, drawing these musicians into tango as they mature is rare, and the first professional orquesta performance in Australia was by the 10-piece Australian Tango Festival Orquesta in 2017. This was a one-off configuration drawing on musicians from Tángalo, Mendoza Tango Quartet, and the mis-named Orquesta La Luna (it’s actually a sextet 🙂 ), and it featured Australia’s first ever front-line of four bandoneóns. Today the 12-piece Melbourne Tango Orquesta similarly draws on musicians from smaller Melbourne-based ensembles, including La Busca and Tango Collusion Trio, but provides an ongoing context for these musicians to integrate and refine their interpretation of classic tango for dancing. The Melbourne Tango Orquesta is the first permanent tango ensemble bringing the emotional depth of an orquesta to Australian dancers on an ongoing basis.

As well the Melbourne Tango Orquesta brings Australia its first cantor del orquesta, Juan Veron de Astrada. He is a great front-man, one of the best, drawing in the audience with laughter and insights into the lyrics he sings. He is opera-trained in Argentina, but now channels the smooth conversational voice of his idol, Carlos Gardel. He is also a tango dancer, and he brings the richness of the Golden Age cantor to complement the Orquesta’s repertoire, his voice seamlessly transitioning from the joy of a vals to a crisp milonga.

Both classically trained and folk musicians in Australia are now becoming interested in tango music and what its musical forms, structures, and techniques can offer, and they bring a high level of individual skill and professionalism to tango. It must also be said that the tight co-ordination of a traditional orquesta típica from the Golden Age is something that can only be developed over time as the musicians work together regularly in a larger configuration. It will be exciting to watch and hear the Melbourne Tango Orquesta mature in this way over time. But this is only a matter of time; there is no doubting the tightness and excitement of its electrifying interpretations of classic Pugliese tangos.

The Melbourne Tango Orquesta is bringing back the big sound of tango, although think Lomuto for instrumentation rather than Di Sarli. The frontline of multiple bandoneóns, the string of violins, piano, and occasionally multiple double basses; these all fits the mould of the classic orquesta. However, the Melbourne Tango Orquesta also incorporates clarinet and guitars. Clarinet was a textual element of several major orquestas, including Canaro and Fresedo as well as Lomuto, but not a common instrument. Guitar was the key instrument of the very early development of tango in the mid-19th century until it was eliminated by Firpo in 1914. For the Melbourne Tango Orquesta the piano channels Firpo’s vision, driving the rhythm and the underlying texture, the bandoneóns and violins bringing a tapestry of depth and delicacy. But unlike many contemporary orquestas overseas the musicians and arrangers of the Melbourne Tango Orquesta have also taken on the challenge of integrating the very different textures of clarinet and guitar to enrich its repertoire of classic tango. Together with the influences of their folk music experience, the result refines and extends the arrangements of Di Sarli, Canaro, Troilo, and their peers that form the core of the Orquesta’s repertoire, bringing new textures to the evolution of contemporary tango music.

*Australian Bureau of Statistics Release 3412.0 – Migration, Australia, 2017-18

PLAYLIST:

  • Milonga Sentimental, meaning ‘Sentimental Milonga’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 9 February 1933; a milonga with music composed by Sebastián Piana in 1932, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Ernesto Famá and Ángel Ramos.
  • Uno, meaning ‘One’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 11 April 1944; a tango with music composed by Mariano Mores in 1943, lyrics by Enrique Santos Discépolo, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Cuando El Amor Muere, meaning ‘When Love Dies’; recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 2 August 1941; a tango with music composed by Alfredo Malerba in 1941, lyrics by Héctor Marcó, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • A La Luz Del Candil, meaning ‘By The Light Of The Candle’, and also known as ‘A La Luz De Un Candil’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 3 March 1943; a tango with music composed by Carlos Vicente Geroni Flores in 1927, lyrics by Julio Plácido Navarrine, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Adiós, Pampa Mía, meaning ‘Farewell, My Pampa’; recorded by Mariano Mores on 22 March 1957; a tango with music composed by Francisco Canaro, Mariano Mores, Ivo Pelay in 1945, lyrics by Francisco Canaro, Mariano Mores, Ivo Pelay, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Un Boliche, from lunfardo, meaning ‘A Bar’, and also known as ‘Ni Mas Ni Menos’;; a tango with music composed by Carlos Acuña, first recorded in 1958, lyrics by Tito Cabano, and sung by Carlos Acuña. Possibly recorded in the 1970s or 1980s.
  • Loca, meaning ‘Floozy’; recorded live from a performance by Melbourne Tango Orquesta at Paris Cat, Melbourne on 1 February 2020; a tango with music composed by Manuel Jovés in 1922 and lyrics by Antonio Viergol.
  • Organito De La Tarde, meaning ‘Hurdy-Gurdy In The Evening’; recorded live from a performance by Melbourne Tango Orquesta at Paris Cat, Melbourne on 1 February 2020; a tango with music composed by Cátulo Castillo in 1923 and lyrics by José González Castillo (Juan de León).
  • La Mariposa, meaning ‘The Butterfly’; recorded live from a performance by Melbourne Tango Orquesta at Paris Cat, Melbourne on 1 February 2020; a tango with music composed by Pedro Maffia in 1921 and lyrics by Celedonio Flores.
  • La Puñalada, meaning ‘The Stabbing’; recorded live from a performance by Melbourne Tango Orquesta at Paris Cat, Melbourne on 1 February 2020; a milonga with music composed by Pintín Castellanos in 1933 and lyrics by Celedonio Flores.