The Gobbi Legacy

2020-01-09 - Alfredo Eusebio & Flora Gobbi.jpg

Last edition took a brief look at the life of Alfredo Eusebio Gobbi and his role in world-wide acceptance of tango; this edition explores the legacy of compositions by the Gobbis, father and son. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit:  http://images.todotango.com/historias/los_gobbi.jpg
Flora and Alfredo Gobbi were both enthusiastic explorers of 20th century technology; this image shows them in driving clothes; another shows them winging over European city landmarks in a biplane, the wings emblazoned with a motto describing them as the South American Argentine Duet,  The Rulers of Gramophones; yet another shows Alfredo seated while Flora stands behind him in a pith helmet ready to venture to darkest jungle at a moment’s notice. They were early adopters of recording technology as well, making some of the earliest commercial recordings of tango, in 1908 in Paris, some years before any recording facilities were available in the Rio Platense region.

PLAYLIST:

  • Capillita De Mi Pueblo, meaning ‘Little Chapel Of My Town’; recorded in 1931; a cancion with music composed by Alfredo E Gobbi, first recorded in 1927, lyrics by Alfredo E Gobbi, and sung by Libertad Lamarque.
  • La Entrerriana, meaning ‘Woman From Entre Ríos Province’; recorded by Alfredo J Gobbi on 16 May 1947; a vals with music composed by Alfredo E Gobbi, first recorded in 1927, lyrics by Alfredo E Gobbi, and sung by Carlos Heredia and Hugo Soler.
  • Sin Madre, meaning ‘Motherless’; recorded by Alfredo J Gobbi on 18 September 1956; a tango with music composed by Alfredo E Gobbi, first recorded in 1924, lyrics by Alfredo E Gobbi, and sung by Alfredo del Rio.
  • La Correntina, meaning ‘The Current’; recorded by Juan D’Arienzo in 1929; a chamarrita with music composed by Alfredo E Gobbi and lyrics by Alfredo E Gobbi.
  • Altar Criollo, meaning ‘High Argentine’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 18 May 1927; a vals with music composed by Alfredo E Gobbi, lyrics by Alfredo E Gobbi, and sung by
  • No Me Abandones, meaning ‘Do Not Leave Me’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 31 July 1928; a vals with music composed by Alfredo E Gobbi, lyrics by Alfredo E Gobbi, and sung by
  • Delirio Gaucho, meaning ‘Mad Gaucho’; recorded by Roberto Firpo on 8 June 1929; a vals with music composed by Alfredo E Gobbi and lyrics by Alfredo E Gobbi.
  • Otra Vez El Viejo, meaning ‘The Old Man Again’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 14 March 1928; a tango with music composed by Alfredo E Gobbi in 1928, lyrics by Alfredo E Gobbi, and sung by
  • A Orlando Goni, meaning ‘To Orlando Goni’, and also known as ‘Orlando Goni’; recorded by Alfredo J Gobbi on 24 March 1949; a tango with music composed by Alfredo J Gobbi. The name is a reference to the highly respected pianist Orlando Goni, who made only one recording..
  • El Andariego, meaning ‘The Walker’; recorded by Alfredo J Gobbi on 27 June 1951; a tango with music composed by Alfredo J Gobbi.
  • Camandulaje, meaning ‘Rosary’; recorded by Alfredo J Gobbi on 13 June 1955; a tango with music composed by Alfredo J Gobbi.
  • A Mis Manos, meaning ‘To My Hands’; recorded by Alfredo J Gobbi on 28 March 1955; a milonga with music composed by Alfredo J Gobbi in 1955, lyrics by Julio Camilloni, and sung by Alfredo del Rio.
  • Amémonos, meaning ‘Let Us Love’; recorded by Alfredo J Gobbi in 1948; a vals with music composed by Alfredo J Gobbi, lyrics by Manuel Maria Flores, and sung by Carlos Heredia and Hugo Soler. Noted in Todotango as written by Carlos Montbrun Ocampo.
  • Mensajera, meaning ‘Messenger’; recorded by Alfredo J Gobbi on 16 April 1957; a vals with music composed by Alfredo J Gobbi, lyrics by Julio Camilloni, and sung by Tito Landó.
  • Tu Angustia Y Mi Dolor, meaning ‘Your Anguish And My Sadness’; recorded by Alfredo J Gobbi on 22 or 28 April 1953; a tango with music composed by Alfredo J Gobbi, lyrics by Julio Camilloni, and sung by Jorge Maciel.
  • Cuartro Novios, meaning ‘Four Boyfriends’; recorded by Alfredo J Gobbi on 22 June 1954; a tango with music composed by Alfredo J Gobbi in 1954, lyrics by Valentín Vergara & Roberto Salinas, and sung by Tito Landó.

 

La Busca, Candelo Folk Festival 2019

2020-01-09 - La Busca at Candelo Folk Festival 2019

With the advent of 2020 Tango Capital starts its 5th year with a look at the man and his wife who brought tango to the notice of the world outside Argentina – Alfredo Eusebio and Flora Gobbi. Kicking off the new year with a return to standard programming, there is a brief report on La Busca at Candelo Folk Festival 2019 and a quick round up of what’s on. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: La Busca on stage at Candelo Folk Festival 2019.

PLAYLIST:

  • Carriego; recorded by Miguel Caló on 5 January 1948; a tango with music composed by Roberto Nievas Blanco, lyrics by Julio Jorge Nelson, and sung by Roberto Arrieta. The name is a reference to the Argentine poet Evaristo Carriego, who had a big influence on the evolution of tango lyrics.
  • La Entrerriana; recorded by Alfredo J Gobbi on 16 May 1947; a vals with music composed by Alfredo Eusebio Gobbi, lyrics by Alfredo Eusebio Gobbi, and sung by Carlos Heredia and Hugo Soler.
  • La Crisis, meaning ‘The Crisis’; a cancion with music composed by Pascual ‘Cholo’ Mamone, lyrics by  Pascual ‘Cholo’ Mamone, and sung by Alfredo Eusebio Gobbi.
  • Preciosa Mía, meaning ‘My Precious’; recorded in 1923; a cancion with music composed by Alfredo Eusebio Gobbi, lyrics by Alfredo Eusebio Gobbi, and sung by Carlos Gardel and Alfredo Eusebio Gobbi.
  • No Me Abandones, meaning ‘Do Not Leave Me’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 31 July 1928; a vals with music composed by Alfredo Eusebio Gobbi, lyrics by Alfredo Eusebio Gobbi, and sung by
  • Sin Madre, meaning ‘Motherless’; recorded by Alfredo J Gobbi on 18 September 1956; a tango with music composed by Alfredo Eusebio Gobbi, first recorded in 1924, lyrics by Alfredo Eusebio Gobbi, and sung by Alfredo Del Rio.
  • Reliquias Porteñas, meaning ‘Memories Of Ladies Of Buenos Aires’; recorded by La Busca in 2017; a milonga with music composed by Graciano de Leone, first recorded in 1938 and lyrics by Celedonio Flores.
  • Invierno, meaning ‘Winter’; recorded by La Busca in 2017; a tango with music composed by Horacio Petarossi, first recorded in 1937, lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo, and sung by Juan de Astrada Veron.
  • Pobre Flor, meaning ‘Poor Flower’; recorded by La Busca in 2017; a vals with music composed by Luis Mottolese, first recorded in 1932, lyrics by Victor Spindola, and sung by Juan de Astrada Veron.
  • El Picaflor, meaning ‘The Lady’s Man’; recorded in 1925; a cancion with music composed by Alfredo Eusebio Gobbi, lyrics by Alfredo Eusebio Gobbi, and sung by Carlos Gardel and Alfredo Eusebio Gobbi.

 

The Tango Decades: 1960-1964

2019-12-19 - The Tango Decades 1960-1964

Bringing a different perspective to the music of tango, The Tango Decades is an 8-part series focusing on a horizontal slice of what was hot, decade by decade, as tango blossomed over 40 years. This last episode is focused on 1960 to 1964, and reviews the forces that emerged during the late 1940s and the 1950s to lay waste to the tango orquestas during the 1960s …. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit:  Background: Vicente Greco established the sextet as the core structure of tango in the very earliest commercial disc recordings of tango dating from around 1910. Insert: Half a century later tango ensembles such as Osvaldo Berlingieri’s Cuarteto were returning to similar, smaller formations, although now as likely to be recording for television.

The smaller configurations reduced the dynamic range that had been a key factor in managing the emotional intensity of the music; together with the incorporation of jazz-related elements the result was a more intellectual style of concert music. While a few icons from the earlier years such as Troilo and Pugliese were able to maintain larger ensembles even their work followed the trend of those around them in moving towards a concert orientation at the expense of dancability. Astor Piazzolla had demonstrated overseas the practicality of small concert formations from the 1950s, but now the stage was cleared for emergence of the new names and styles of La Vanguardia in Argentina.  It was a generational change for the musicians, and it took a generation for tango dancing to return.

PLAYLIST:

2019-12-22 - Playlist

 

 

 

 

The Tango Decades: 1955-1959

2019-12-10 - The Tango Decades 1955-1959

Bringing a different perspective to the music of tango, The Tango Decades is an 8-part series focusing on a horizontal slice of what was hot, decade by decade, as tango blossomed over 40 years. This seventh episode is focused on 1955 to 1959, and explores the interaction between tango and television….That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Juan D’Arienzo performing in a television studio; the piece is ‘Loca’ which he re-recorded on 22 December 1955, so the image may date from 1955 or 1956 (image is in the public domain).

PLAYLIST:

2019-12-15 - Playlist