The Tango Conversation

2019-09-12 - Tango Connection (courtesy - Iris Toren)

Tango is a social dance, and the quintessential social activity is a conversation. Tanguero Peter Newell introduces his  ‘5Cs’ that go together to make up the tango conversation.   That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: by courtesy of Iris Toren.

Jorge Maciel, baritone badboy

2019-09-05 - Jorge Maciel

Last edition took a brief look at the singing of Jorge Maciel, and this edition explores his recording legacy with Pugliese in more detail. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit: http://www.todotango.com/creadores/ficha/967/Jorge-Maciel

PLAYLIST:

  • Canzoneta, meaning ‘Little Tune’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 29 October 1954; a tango with music composed by Erma Suárez in 1951, lyrics by Enrique Lary, and sung by Jorge Maciel.
  • Si Yo Pudiera Olvidarla, meaning ‘If I Could Forget Her’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 13 December 1954; a tango with music composed by Osvaldo Taratino, lyrics by Alfredo Lucero Palacios, and sung by Jorge Maciel.
  • Cascabelito, meaning ‘Jingling Bell’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 22 September 1955; a tango with music composed by José Bohr in 1924, lyrics by Juan Andrés Caruso, and sung by Jorge Maciel.
  • Esta Noche De Luna, meaning ‘This Night Of The Moon’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 2 September 1955; a tango with music composed by Graciano Gómez and José García, first recorded in 1943, lyrics by Héctor Marcó, and sung by Jorge Maciel.
  • Y Todavía Te Quiero, meaning ‘And I Always Desire You’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 21 June 1956; a tango with music composed by Luciano Leocata in 1956, lyrics by Abel Aznar, and sung by Jorge Maciel.
  • No Me Hablen De Ella, meaning ‘Do Not Speak To Me Of Her’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 25 October 1957; a tango with music composed by Titi Rossi and Jorge Mareira, lyrics by Titi Rossi and Jorge Mareira, and sung by Jorge Maciel.
  • Perla Fina, meaning ‘Fine Pearl’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 18 December 1957; a tango with music composed by Juan Carlos Lotito and Norbeto Omar Lotito, lyrics by Vladimiro Vega, and sung by Jorge Maciel.
  • Melenita De Ora, meaning ‘Hair Of Gold’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese in 1960; a tango with music composed by Carlos Vicente Geroni Flores in 1922, lyrics by Samuel Linnig, and sung by Jorge Maciel.
  • Dos Amores, meaning ‘Two Loves’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese in 1961; a tango with music composed by Antonio Sureda, first recorded in 1932, lyrics by Gerónimo Sureda, and sung by Jorge Maciel.
  • Candombe Blanco, meaning ‘White Candombe’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese in 1961; a milonga with music composed by Emilio Balcarce, first recorded in 1961, lyrics by Julio Camilloni, and sung by Jorge Maciel and Alfredo Belusi.
  • Por Qué La Quise Tango, meaning ‘Why I Love d Her So Much’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese in 1962; a tango with music composed by Mariano Mores in 1961, lyrics by Rodolfo M Taboada, and sung by Jorge Maciel.
  • El Adiós, meaning ‘The Good-bye’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese in 1963; a tango with music composed by Maruja Pacheco Huergo in 1937, lyrics by Virgilio San Clemente, and sung by Jorge Maciel.
  • Jamás Lo Vas A Saber, meaning ‘You Will Never Know’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese in 1966; a tango with music composed by Manual Sucher, lyrics by Abel Aznar, and sung by Jorge Maciel.
  • Qué Solo Estoy, meaning ‘How Lonely I Am’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese in 1966; a tango with music composed by Raúl Kaplún, first recorded in 1943, lyrics by Roberto Miro, and sung by Jorge Maciel.
  • Navidad, meaning ‘Christmas’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese in 1966; a vals with music composed by Osvaldo Pugliese, lyrics by Eduardo Moreno, and sung by Jorge Maciel.

Tango Sur

2019-08-29 - Tango Sur playing The Brunswick Green on 30 April 2019

Tango Sur is a new collaboration based in Melbourne, and we catch up with them,  but first there is a brief look at the life and legacy of singer Jorge Maciel, and a quick round-up of What’s On.  That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Tango Sur playing the Brunswick Green, Melbourne, on 30 April 2019.

One of the significant influences on the band is Danilo Rojas‘s professional status as a pianist and teacher, with a masters degree in jazz and improvisation; another is his Bolivian heritage, as the musics of the Andes also includes improvisation. Diego Neder is also from South America, but from Argentina, from Sante Fe, in the centre of Argentina’s folkloric heartland, and he plays electric bass rather than the acoustic guitar of that tradition. Salvador Persico is an Australian percussionist with Italian and South American heritage; his formal musical education at the Victorian College of the Arts is also slanted towards improvisation and his music is heavily influenced by Afro-Cuban and Latin American folk/popular music, Latin Jazz, 70’s Salsa and Reggae. Chris Maunders is also Australian and professionally trained at the VCA, and appears intent on restoring the chromatic harmonica to the importance it had in the development of jazz during the 1930s and 1940s. With themes of formal training, improvisation and interests in various musics from the Americas reinforcing each other there’s a lot to like there, but how does it all sit with tango? Listen in…

PLAYLIST:

  • Felicia, recorded by Juan D’Arienzo on 1 September 1939. It’s; a tango with music composed by Enrique Saborido, first recorded in 1927, and has been recorded dozens of times since. It does have lovely lyrics by Carlos Mauricio Pacheco; they are a cry of loss from a Uruguayan expatriate who believes he will never see or smell the flowers and beaches of his homeland again, but I don’t think they have ever been recorded.
  • Remembranza, meaning ‘Remembrances’; a tango recorded by Alfredo J Gobbi on 8 September 1948, with music composed by Mario Melfi in 1934, lyrics by Mario Battistella and sung by Jorge Maciel.
  • La Vieja Serenata, meaning ‘The Old Serenade’; a vals recorded by Alfredo J Gobbi in 1949, with music composed by Teofilo Ibáñez, lyrics by Sandalia Gómez and sung by Jorge Maciel.
  • Tropa, from the lunfardo meaning ‘Crowd’, it’s a tango recorded by Alfredo J Gobbi on 31 October 1950, with music composed by Ángel Raúl Vilar, lyrics by Pedro Blasco and sung by Jorge Maciel and Héctor Coral.
  • Silueta Porteña, meaning ‘Shadow of a Woman from Buenos Aires’; a milonga recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 2 August 1956; music composed by Nicolas Luis Cuccaro and Juan Ventura Cuccaro in 1936, lyrics by Orlando D’Aniello and Ernesto Noli and sung by Jorge Maciel and Miguel Montero.
  • Adiós Corazón, meaning ‘Good-bye, Heart’; a tango recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 29 May 1958; with music composed by Lalo Etchegoncelay first recorded in 1957, lyrics by Héctor Sapelli and sung by Jorge Maciel.
  • El Motivo, meaning ‘The Motive’, and also known as ‘Pobre Paica’; recorded live from a performance by Tango Sur at The Brunswick Green, Melbourne, on 30 April 2019; a tango with music composed by Juan Carlos Cobián in 1920 and lyrics by Pascual Contursi.
  • Como Dos Extraños, meaning ‘Like Two Strangers’; recorded live from a performance by Tango Sur at The Brunswick Green, Melbourne, on 30 April 2019; a tango with music composed by Pedro Laurenz in 1940.
  • De Antaño from the ‘Good Enough For Gringos’ release in 2013, meaning ‘Of Days Gone By’; a milonga recorded by Tángalo with music and lyrics by Luis Rubistein in 1939, and sung here by Susie Bishop.

Belinda Stopar, alternative DJ

2019-08-15 - Belinda Stopar DJing at Project NFT

 

We talk with Belinda Stopar, Australia’s first female alternative tango DJ, about what got her into DJing  and what it’s like to DJ Australia’s longest running alternative practilonga. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Belinda Stopar behind the deck at ProjectNFT

PLAYLIST:

  • Enjoy The Silence, from the collection ‘Buenos Aires Remixed’ recorded and released by Tanghetto in 2005; a nuevo tango from music composed by Martin L Gore and first recorded in 1990.
  • La Valse D’Amélie, meaning ‘The Waltz Of Amélie’; a waltz composed by Yann Tiersen. This is the orchestra version from the soundtrack of the movie Amélie.
  • Otra Luna, meaning ‘Other Moon’, from the collection ‘Narcotango’ recorded and released by Carlos Libedinsky in 2003; a nuevo tango composed by Carlos Libedinsky.
  • Army Dreamers, from the collection ‘Never For Ever’ released in 1980; a vals with music and lyrics composed and sung by Kate Bush.
  • Ariele E Calibano, from the self-titled collection ‘Sinterra’ recorded and released by Sinterra in 2008. The name is a reference to two spirits in Shakespeare’s last play, The Tempest: Ariel is – as his name suggests – of the air, elf-like and child-like, mischievious but innocent; by contrast, Caliban is of the earth, man-like and malign, conscious but lacking conscience.
  • Salento, from the collection ‘Plaisirs D’Amour’ recorded and released by René Aubry in 1998 with Christophe Guiot on violin. The name is a reference to the region that makes up the heel of the boot-shaped peninsula of Italy.
  • Milonguero Del Ayer, meaning ‘Tango Dancer Of Yesterday’; from the collection ‘Choros’ recorded and released in 2005 by Craig Einhorn.

 

Juan Carlos Godoy, singer

2019-08-10 - Juan Carlos Godoy at La Viruta in June 2015

Last edition described the life and legacy of the last of the Golden Age musicians, Juan Carlos Godoy, and this edition explores his early singing with Alfredo De Angelis in more detail. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Juan Carlos Godoy singing with the Pablo Valle Orquesta at La Viruta, June 2015.

 PLAYLIST:

  • La Última Copa, meaning ‘The Last Cup’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 17 April 1958; a tango with music composed by Francisco Canaro in 1925, lyrics by Juan Andrés Caruso, and sung by Juan Carlos Godoy.
  • Se Va La Vida, meaning ‘Life Goes On’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 6 April 1959; a tango with music composed by Edgardo Donato and Roberto Zerillo in 1929, lyrics by Luis Mario, and sung by Juan Carlos Godoy.
  • Llévame, Carretero, meaning ‘Take Me [there], Driver’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 26 June 1961; a tango with music composed by Manuel Parada, first recorded in 1930, lyrics by José Cicarelli, and sung by Juan Carlos Godoy.
  • Quién Tiene Tu Amor, meaning ‘Who Has Your Love?’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 21 August 1958; a tango with music composed by Leopoldo Díaz Vélez in 1958, lyrics by Leopoldo Díaz Vélez, and sung by Juan Carlos Godoy.
  • Ni Tú Ni Yo, meaning ‘Neither You Nor I’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 29 August 1961; a tango with music composed by Juan Pomati, first recorded in 1961, lyrics by Reinaldo Yiso, and sung by Juan Carlos Godoy.
  • Vuelve Amor, meaning ‘Love, Return’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 20 July 1959; a tango with music composed by Roberto Rufino, first recorded in 1959, lyrics by Reinaldo Yiso, and sung by Juan Carlos Godoy.
  • Un Duende … Nada Más, meaning ‘An Elf…Nothing More’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 19 October 1960; a tango with music composed by Tito Ferrari, first recorded in 1960, lyrics by Alberto Coria, and sung by Juan Carlos Godoy.
  • Yo No Sé Llorar, meaning ‘I Don’t Know How To Weep’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 17 April 1958; a tango with music composed by Joaquín Do Reyes in 1933, lyrics by Celedonio Flores, and sung by Juan Carlos Godoy and Oscar Larroca. This is the song that Godoy sang at his audition with De Angelis.
  • Si Nos Queremos Todavía, meaning ‘If We Still Love One Another’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 5 June 1959; a tango with music composed by Héctor Gentile, lyrics by Ángel Di Rosa, and sung by Juan Carlos Godoy.
  • Hermana, meaning ‘Sister’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 26 September 1958; a vals with music composed by Miguel Roberto Abrodos in 1958, lyrics by Eugenio Majul, and sung by Juan Carlos Godoy.
  • Angélica; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 8 August 1961; a vals with music composed by Roberto Cambaré, first recorded in 1961, lyrics by Roberto Cambaré, and sung by Juan Carlos Godoy.
  • Ilusión Azul, meaning ‘Blue Illusion’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis in 1964; a vals with music composed by Arquímedes Arci, first recorded in 1933, lyrics by Arquímedes Arci, and sung by Juan Carlos Godoy and Roberto Mancini.
  • Nadie Quiso Más, meaning ‘No-one Wanted More’, and also known as ‘Nadie Quizo Mas’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 5 November 1958; a tango with music composed by Alfredo De Angelis, first recorded in 1958, lyrics by José Rótulo, and sung by Juan Carlos Godoy.
  • Media Noche, meaning ‘Midnight’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 11 December 1958; a tango with music composed by Nicolás Alberto Tavarozzi, first recorded in 1927, lyrics by Eduardo Escaris Méndez, and sung by Juan Carlos Godoy.
  • Yo Sé Que Te Adoro, meaning ‘I Know That I Adore You’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 25 June 1958; a tango with music composed by Juan Polito and Carlos Ángel Lázzari, lyrics by Pedro Gregorio Gallelli, and sung by Juan Carlos Godoy.
  • Más Allá Del Corazón, meaning ‘Beyond The Heart’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 13 October 1959; a tango with music composed by Juan Pomati, first recorded in 1959, lyrics by Reinaldo Yiso, and sung by Juan Carlos Godoy.
  • Entre Tu Amor Y Mi Amor, meaning ‘Between Your Love And My Love’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 18 August 1959; a tango with music composed by Juan Pomati, lyrics by Reinaldo Yiso, and sung by Juan Carlos Godoy.
  • Tu Olvido Y Yo, meaning ‘You Forgot, And I’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 28 November 1960; a tango with music composed by Roberto Sucher, first recorded in 1960, lyrics by Roberto Lambertucci, and sung by Juan Carlos Godoy.

 

Oblivion Tango Duo, in concert

2019-08-01 - Oblivion Tango Duo at Braidwood, 31 March 2019

Daniel Wallace-Crabbe on bandoneón and Daniel Rojas on piano together make up Oblivion Tango Duo, and there is a review of their performance in Braidwood, NSW in March this year, but first there is a brief look at the life and legacy of the last of the great tango musicians of the Golden Age, singer Juan Carlos Godoy. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Oblivion Tango Duo playing at St Andrew’s Anglican Church, Braidwood, NSW, on 31 March 2019.

PLAYLIST:

  • El Distinguido Ciudadano, meaning ‘The Distinguished Citizen Of The City’; recorded by Ánibal Troilo on 4 August 1943; a tango with music composed by Peregrino Paulos, first recorded in 1916.
  • Canchero, meaning ‘Show-off’; recorded in 2010; a canción with music composed by Arturo De Bassi in 1930, lyrics by Celedonio Flores, and sung by Juan Carlos Godoy.
  • Decís Que No Te Quiero, meaning ‘You Say I Don’t Love You’; recorded by Ricardo Tanturi on 22 October 1956; a tango with music composed by Ricardo Tanturi, lyrics by Reinaldo Yiso, and sung by Juan Carlos Godoy.
  • No Culpes Al Amor, meaning ‘Don’t Blame Love’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 7 November 1958; a tango with music composed by Roberto Caló, lyrics by Juan Pueblito, and sung by Juan Carlos Godoy.
  • Mi Luna, meaning ‘My Moon’; recorded by José Basso in 1968; a tango, first recorded in 1961 sung by Juan Carlos Godoy.
  • Casas Viejas, meaning ‘Old Houses’; a tango with music composed by Francisco Canaro in 1935, lyrics by Ivo Pelay, and sung by Juan Carlos Godoy and Roberto Mancini. Argentinian recordings are rarely marked with a publication date, and accordingly the date of release of the LP record Junto a Tu Corazón is unclear, but by the cover art it would likely be in the 1960s, and this is consistent with other details of Godoy’s career.
  • Oblivion, meaning ‘Oblivion’; from the collection ‘Nocturno’ released in 2019, recorded by Oblivion Tango Duo in 2018; a nuevo tango with music composed by Astor Piazzolla, first recorded in 1972.
  • La Trampera, meaning ‘The Cheating Woman’; from the collection ‘Nocturno’ released in 2018, recorded by Oblivion Tango Duo in 2018; a milonga with music composed by Ánibal Troilo, first recorded in 1950.
  • Flor De Lino, meaning ‘Flax Flower’; from the collection ‘Nocturno’ released in 2018, recorded by Oblivion Tango Duo in 2018; a vals with music composed by Héctor Stamponi in 1947 and lyrics by Homero Expósito.
  • Gran Hotel Victoria, a reference to a hotel in the provincial city of Rosario in Argentina; from the collection ‘Nocturno’ released in 2018, recorded by Oblivion Tango Duo in 2018; a tango with music composed by Feliciano Latasa in 1906 and lyrics by Carlos Pesce.
  • Obsesión, meaning ‘Obsession’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis in 1964; a tango with music and lyrics written by Ricardo Lanzetta, and sung by Juan Carlos Godoy. This recording was made in the country of Columbia (Colombia Discos Fuentes 3001).