Fernando Tell – the music

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And, after the brief introduction last week, this week the music of Fernando Tell is unpacked, with examples from Francini-Pontier, Troilo, and a very young Piazzolla.

That’s Tango Capital, Sunday evening from 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit: Todotango – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LteO-CSYvjU

PLAYLIST:

  • De Vuelta Al Bulín, meaning ‘Back To the Room’, a tango recorded by Astor Piazzolla, on 20 March 1946, with music composed by José Martinez, composed in 1914, with lyrics by Pascual Contursi, and sung by Francisco Fiorentini.
  • En Carne Propia, meaning ‘In The Flesh’, a tango recorded by Astor Piazzolla, on 21 May 1946, with music composed by Manuel Sucher, composed in 1946, with lyrics by Carlos Bahr, and sung by Francisco Fiorentini.
  • Viejo Ciego, meaning ‘Blind Old Man’, a tango recorded by Astor Piazzolla, on 10 January 1946, with music composed by Cátulo Castillo and Sebastián Piana, composed in 1926, with lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Francisco Fiorentini.
  • A Orlando Goni, meaning ‘To Orlando Goni’, a tango recorded by Anibal Troilo in 1952, with music composed by Alfredo Gobbi, first recorded in 1949.
  • Chique, meaning ‘Highly Ornamented – it’s a description of the music by the composer’, a tango recorded by Anibal Troilo in 1952, with music composed by Ricardo Luis Brignolo, composed in 1920, with lyrics by Ricardo Luis Brignolo.
  • El Entrerriano, meaning ‘a reference to the person to whom the music was dedicated’, a tango recorded by Anibal Troilo in 1952, with music composed by A Rosendo (Rosendo Mendizábal, composed in 1897-1898.
  • A Mi Madre, meaning ‘To My Mother’, a vals recorded by Francini-Pontier, on 10 May 1948, with music composed by Francisco Peña, first recorded in 1928, with lyrics by Francisco Peña, and sung by Roberto Rufino.
  • A Su Memoria, meaning ‘To Her Memory’, a vals recorded by Francini-Pontier, on 5 March 1947, with music composed by Antonio Sureda, first recorded in 1927, with lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Roberto Rufino.
  • Milonga En Negro, meaning ‘Milonga In Black’, a milonga recorded by Anibal Troilo, on 31 March 1949, with music composed by Edmundo Rivero, with lyrics by Edmundo Rivero, and sung by Edmundo Rivero.
  • Miriñaque, meaning ‘Crinoline’, a milonga recorded by Anibal Troilo, on 20 October 1949, with music composed by Alberto Mastra, composed in 1947, with lyrics by Alberto Mastra, and sung by Aldo Calderón and Edmundo Rivero.
  • La Culpa Es Mia, meaning ‘The Fault Is Mine’, a tango recorded by Francini-Pontier, on 11June 1947, with music composed by Arturo Gallucci, with lyrics by Victorino Velasquez, and sung by Raúl Berón.
  • Uno Y Uno, meaning ‘One And One’, a tango recorded by Francini-Pontier, on 13 August 1947, with music composed by Julio Pollero, composed in 1929, with lyrics by Lorenzo Juan Traverso, and sung by Raúl Berón.
  • Y Dicen Que No Te Quiero, meaning ‘And They Say I Do Not Love You’, a tango recorded by Francini-Pontier, on 2 April 1947, with music composed by José Canet, with lyrics by José Canet, and sung by Raúl Berón.
  • El Baqueano, meaning ‘The Gaucho’, a tango recorded by Anibal Troilo, on 12 September 1969, with music composed by Augustín Bardi, first recorded in 1927.
  • La Trilla, meaning ‘The Threshing’, a tango recorded by Anibal Troilo, on 12 August 1969, with music composed by Eduardo Arolas, first recorded in 1916, with lyrics by Héctor Polito.
  • El Ultimo Farol, meaning ‘The Last Streetlamp’, a tango recorded by Anibal Troilo, on 30 July 1969, with music composed by Anibal Troilo, with lyrics by Cátulo Castillo.

“Blackness And Tango”

.2017-01-22-blackness-andtango-wordpress-facebookA recent book release from Abrazos, Blackness And Tango, is reviewed, Fabian Salás finishes his discussion of the evolution of the dance with a comment on the future, and there is a look at the impact of bandoneónista Fernando Tell.

Abrazos is located in Stuttgart, Germany and also in Cordoba in Argentina, and since 1999 has specialised publication of books about Argentinian literature and tango written in English, German, Italian, French and Spanish.

That’s Tango Capital, Sunday evening from 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: My copy of the book “Blackness and Tango” by Monica Fumagalli, from Abrazos press, 2016. It is the policy of this program not to accept gifts or donations for review. Events and items for review such as this book are always purchased.

PLAYLIST:

  • Soy Una Fiera, meaning ‘I am an animal’, a milonga recorded by Astor Piazzolla, on 25 September 1945, with music composed by Francisco Isidro Martino, first recorded in 1926, with lyrics by Francisco Isidro Martino, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino.
  • Los Despojos, meaning ‘The Remains’, a tango recorded by Francini-Pontier, on 11 June 1947, with music composed by José Dames, with lyrics by Horacio Sanuinetti, and sung by Roberto Rufino.
  • A Unos Ojos, meaning ‘To A Set Of Eyes’, a vals recorded by Anibal Troilo, on 31 March 1949, with music composed by Carlos Montbrun Ocampo, with lyrics by Gabriel Héctor Hernán Videla, and sung by Aldo Calderón and Edmundo Riveo.
  • Tinta Verde, meaning ‘Green Ink’, an instrumental tango recorded by Anibal Troilo, on 23 November 1970, with music composed by Augustin Bardi, first recorded in 1927.
  • Tocá Tangó, meaning ‘He Plays Tango’, a candombe with music and lyrics by Juan Carlos Caceres and sung by Juan Carlos Caceres in 2000.
  • Pero Yo Se, meaning ‘But I Know’, a tango recorded by Anibal Troilo in 1954, with music composed by Azucena Maizani, composed in 1928, with lyrics by Azucena Maizani, and sung by Raúl Berón.
  • A La Gran Muñeca, meaning ‘To a great girl’, a tango recorded by Carlos Di Sarli, on 29 August 1945, with music composed by Jesús Ventura, composed in 1919, with lyrics by Miguel Osés.
  • El Choclo, meaning ‘The Corncob’, a tango recorded by Carlos Di Sarli, on 30 June 1954, with music composed by Ángel Villoldo, composed in 1910 and these lyrics from 1947, with lyrics by Enrique Santos Discépolo and Juan Carlos Marambio Catán.
  • Milonguero Viejo, meaning ‘Old Master of Tango’, a tango recorded by Carlos Di Sarli, on 7 April 1940, with music composed by Carlos Di Sarli, first recorded in 1926, with lyrics by Enrique Carrera Sotelo.

Enrique Alessio – the music

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Enrique Alessio featured last week so this week focuses on his music in more depth, tracing how he was able to adapt the style he developed early on with Pugliese to the orquestas of D’Arienzo and the singing of Alberto Castillo.

That’s Tango Capital, Sunday evening from 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

  • broadcasting on 2xxfm 98.3 in Canberra

 

Image Credit:
http://www.todotango.com/creadores/ficha/869/Enrique-Alessio

PLAYLIST:

  • Farol, meaning ‘Streetlamp’, a tango recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese, on 15 July 1943, with music composed by Virgilio Expósito 1943, with lyrics by Homero Expósito, and sung by Roberto Chanel.
  • Muchachos comienza la ronda, meaning ‘Guys, start the ronda’, a tango recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese, on 27 August 1943, with music composed by Luis Porcell in 1943, with lyrics by Leonardo Díaz Vélez, and sung by Roberto Chanel.
  • Que bien te queda, meaning ‘Good that you have left’, a tango recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese, on 21 October 1943, with music composed by Vicente Salerno, with lyrics by Juan Florencio Mazaroni, and sung by Roberto Chanel.
  • Amarroto, meaning ‘Crushed’, a tango recorded by Juan D’Arienzo, on 12 September 1951, with music composed by Juan Cao in 1951, with lyrics by Miguel Bucino, and sung by Alberto Echagüe.
  • El Nene Del Abasto, meaning ‘The baby of Abasto (a suburb in Buenos Aires)’, a tango recorded by Juan D’Arienzo, on 12 September 1951, with music composed by Eladio Blanco, with lyrics by Raúl Hormaza, and sung by Alberto Echagüe.
  • Sepe Nopo Ripi Tapa, a tango recorded by Juan D’Arienzo, on 12 September 1951, with music composed by Juan D’Arienzo and Fulvio Salamanca, with lyrics by Carlos Bahr, and sung by Alberto Echagüe.
  • Ahora Tengo Un Amor, meaning ‘Now I have a love’, a vals recorded by Enrique Alessio in 1947, with music and lyrics by Rodolfo Sciammarella, and sung by Alberto Castillo.
  • Violetas, meaning ‘Violets’, a vals recorded by Enrique Alessio in 1948, with music composed by Juan Félix Maglio, composed in 1930, with lyrics by Francisco Brancatti, and sung by Alberto Castillo.
  • El Torito, meaning ‘The Little Fighter’, a milonga recorded by Juan D’Arienzo, on 29 April 1954, with music composed by Ángel Villoldo in 1910, with lyrics by Carlos Pesce and Antonio Polito.
  • La Endiablada, meaning ‘The Wretched Woman’, a milonga recorded by Juan D’Arienzo, on 10 June 1955, with music composed by Pintín Castellanos.
  • Baile De Los Morenos, meaning ‘Dance of the dark people’, a candombe recorded by Enrique Alessio, on 11 April 1947, with music composed by Romeo Gavioli and Carmelo Imperio, with lyrics by Gerónimo Yorio, and sung by Alberto Castillo.
  • El Aguatero Porteño, meaning ‘The Watercarrier of Buenos Aires’, a candombe recorded by Enrique Alessio in 1947, with music composed by Enrique Maciel, with lyrics by Tito Sobral, and sung by Alberto Castillo.
  • Tristeza Criolla, meaning ‘Sorrow of a native-born’, a vals recorded by Juan D’Arienzo, on 2 November 1954, with music composed by Ignacio Corsini, composed in 1910, with lyrics by Julián De Charras, and sung by Armando Laborde.
  • La Sonrisa De Mama, meaning ‘The mother’s smile’, a vals recorded by Juan D’Arienzo, on 1 September 1954, with music and lyrics by Carlos Bahr, Juan D’Arienzo, and Fulvio Salamanca, and sung by Armando Laborde.
  • Soy Porteño Y Soy Varon, meaning ‘I am of Buenos Aires and I am male’, a tango recorded by Enrique Alessio, on 23 May 1946, with music composed by Roque Miguel Potenza, with lyrics by Alberto Luis De Franco, and sung by Alberto Castillo.
  • Viento En Contra, meaning ‘Against the wind’, a tango recorded by Enrique Alessio in 1947, with music composed by Emilio Brameri, with lyrics by Alberto Luis De Franco, and sung by Alberto Castillo.
  • Ninguna, meaning ‘None’, a tango recorded by Enrique Alessio, on 8 January 1948, with music composed by Raúl Ferdández Siro in 1942, with lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Alberto Castillo.
  • Recuerdo, meaning ‘Memory’, a tango recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese, on 31 March 1944, with music composed by Osvaldo Pugliese in 1924, with lyrics by Eduardo Moreno, although this is an instrumental version.

 

Fabian Salás – tango legend

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This Sunday includes the second part of the interview with tango legend Fabian Salás as he discusses the evolution of the dance, and a look at the life of bandoneónista Enrique Alessio.

That’s Tango Capital, Sunday evening from 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image:  Fabian Salás in the studio with Ann Smith on 12 September 2016.

PLAYLIST:

  • El Rodeo, meaning ‘The Detour’, a tango recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese, on 15 July 1943, with music composed by Agustin Bardi, first recorded in 1920.
  • Unitaria, a vals recorded by Enrique Alessio, on 25 October 1946, with music composed by Enrique Maciel, composed in 1946, with lyrics by Arsenio Mármol, and sung by Alberto Castillo.
  • Se Lustra Señor, meaning ‘Excellent Sir’, a tango recorded by Enrique Alessio, on 25 October 1946, with music composed by Enrique Alessio and Eduardo Del Piano, composed in 1946, with lyrics by Elizardo Martínez Vilas.
  • El Hipo, meaning ‘Hiccups (with a pun on ‘breathtaking’)’, a tango recorded by Juan D’Arienzo, on 19 December 1951, with music composed by Enrique Alessio, first recorded in 1951, with lyrics by Reinaldo Yiso, and sung by Alberto Echagüe.
  • Cantemos Corazón, meaning ‘Heart, we sing’, a tango recorded by Carlos Di Sarli, on 2 November 1956, with music composed by Enrique Alessio, first recorded in 1956, with lyrics by Reinaldo Yiso, and sung by Roberto Florio.
  • No Llores, Madre, meaning ‘ Do Not Cry, Mother’, a vals recorded by Juan D’Arienzo, on 3 July 1936, with music composed by Francisco Lauro, first recorded in 1936, with lyrics by Alfredo Faustino Roldán.
  • Un Placer, meaning ‘A Pleasure’, a vals recorded by Juan D’Arienzo, on 3 April 1936, with music composed by Vicente Romeo, first recorded in 1922, with lyrics by Juan Andrés Caruso, and sung by Walter Cabral.
  • Pabellón De Las Rosas, meaning ‘Pavilion Of The Roses (the name of an entertainment venue in Buenos Aires around the 1900s)’, a vals recorded by Juan D’Arienzo, on 12 December 1935, with music composed by José Felipetti, first recorded in 1933, with lyrics by Antonio Catania and Angela MarÍa Catania.

The Tango Capital Studio 2.0

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The Tango Capital studio has had its first major upgrade!

A digital hybrid unit from Telos has been installed – its the skinny black box underneath the mixer and computer. This enables interviews to be conducted by phone.

International interviews will now be feasible. Looking forward to bringing interviews on technicalities and tango from overseas to you over 2017.

Thank you to Myk Dowling on design, construction, and installation.

And thank you to SWAMP for sound advice and sound absorbance: http://www.swamp.net.au

27 September 2016: footnote to a footnote…

In looking back over 2016 I noticed that my comparison of the speed of the Australian singer Josè Carbo to classic tango singers is a little one-sided in effect. So to even the field I have a similar analysis of some songs by a modermarcelo-alvarez-marcelo-alvarez-sings-gardel-cover-artn Argentinian singer.

Marcelo Álvarez (27 February 1962-), born Córdoba, Argentina, is a lyric tenor singer with an international career in opera. In 2000 he released Marcelo Álvarez Sings Gardel through Sony Classical. Recorded 16-23 August 1999 in Buenos Aires, it is a selection of Carlos Gardel’s tangos, accompanied by Nestor Marconi on bandoneón and Pablo Ziegler on piano among others. Eleven of the thirteen tracks were written by Gardel, and Track 13 is a digitally-mastered duet of Álvarez singing Mi Buenos Aires Querido with a 1934 recording of Carlos Gardel.

Compared to Gardel’s recordings of the same songs from during and just before the ‘Golden Age’, these tracks are on average over a third longer, and even Track 13, where Álvarez sings with Gardel, is 17% longer. Álvarez must be singing at the same tempo as Gardel on that track, so this clarifies that some of the difference is in the arrangement. But that track is one of the closest to Gardel’s length, and listening to other pieces such as Tomo Y Obligo, which is 51% longer,  makes clear that as well the tempo of Álvarez’ singing is overall much slower.

It’s not just Carbo that sings so slowly, it’s all modern operatically trained singers.