Tángalo

There’s a retrospective look at Sydney-based Tángalo, who brought a new level of tango bailable to Australasia with complex arrangements and outstanding musicianship. Continuing the dancability theme, Pugliese features, exploring his unusual distinction of being a major influence on the trajectory of both tango music and how tango is danced. And there’s a quick round-up of What’s On. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit:Ann Smith – Tángalo playing the Tango Social Club of Canberra milonga on 2 June 2018.

PLAYLIST:

  • Que No Sepan Las Estrellas, meaning ‘What The Stars Do Not Know’; recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 3 January 1945; a tango with music composed by José Ranieri, lyrics by Alfredo Faustino Roldán, and sung by Jorge Durán.  
  • Negracha; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 24 June 1948; a tango with music composed by Osvaldo Pugliese. The name is a reference to an Afro-Argentine woman.  
  • Recuerdo, meaning ‘Memory’; recorded by Julio De Caro on 9 December 1926; a tango with music composed by Osvaldo Pugliese in 1924 and lyrics by Eduardo Moreno.  
  • El Apronte, meaning ‘The Hope Chest’; recorded by Roberto Firpo in 1926; a tango with music composed by Roberto Firpo.  
  • Farol, meaning ‘Streetlamp’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 15 July 1943; a tango with music composed by Virgilio Expósito, lyrics by Homero Expósito, and sung by Robero Chanel. The lyrics sketch tango playing in suburbs lit by streetlights, referencing the Argentine nationalist poet Evaristo Carriego who’s poetry influenced many tango lyrics. 
  • La Yumba; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 21 August 1946; a tango with music composed by Osvaldo Pugliese. The name is a reference to the deep sound of tango arrastres.  
  • Remembranzas, meaning ‘Memories’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 4 July 1956; a tango with music composed by Mario Melfi, first recorded in 1934, lyrics by Mario Battistella, and sung by Jorge Maciel.  
  • Jacinto Chiclana, from the collection ‘Good Enough For Gringos’ released in 2013, recorded by Tángalo in 2013; a nuevo with music composed by Astor Piazzolla, first recorded in 1965, lyrics by Jorge Luís  Borges, and sung by Emily-Rose  Sárkova and Owen Salomé. The song title is a reference to the name of an imaginary street-wise porteño, a man of Buenos Aires. 
  • Carnaval De Mi Barrio, meaning ‘Festival Of My Suburb’; from the collection ‘Good Enough For Gringos’ released in 2013, recorded by Tángalo in 2013; a tango with music and lyrics composed by Luis Rubistein, first recorded in 1938, and sung by Susie Bishop.  
  • Poema, meaning ‘Poem’; from the collection ‘Good Enough For Gringos’ released in 2013, recorded by Tángalo in 2013; a tango with music composed by Mario Melfi in 1935, lyrics by Eduardo Bianco, and sung by Susie Bishop.  
  • Dos Corazones, meaning ‘Two Hearts’; from the collection ‘Good Enough For Gringos’ released in 2013, recorded by Tángalo in 2013; a tango with music composed by Francisco Canaro, first recorded in 1944, lyrics by Ivo Pelay, and sung by Susie Bishop and Emily-Rose Sárkova.  
  • De Antaño, meaning ‘Of  Times Gone By’; from the collection ‘Good Enough For Gringos’ released in 2013, recorded by Tángalo in 2013; a milonga with music and lyrics composed by Luis Rubistein, first recorded in 1939, and sung by Susie Bishop, Emily-Rose Sárkova, and Owen Salomé.  

Image Credit: Ann Smith – Tángalo playing the Tango Social Club of Canberra milonga on 2 June 2018.

Tango Capital – By The Lake

Tomorrow will be cloudy, cooler, and clearing – so perfect for dancing. Tango Capital By The Lake is Covid-19-safe tango in the Tango Capital, every Tuesday throughout the summer.

DAY: Tuesdays, from 1 December to the end of February.
TIME: 5:30pm-7:30pm (unless actually raining).
WHERE: Queen Elizabeth Terrace, Parkes.In front of the Reconciliation Monument on the south bank of Lake Burley Griffin, near the Waterfront Restaurant, Parliamentary Triangle, Canberra.
COVID-19 SAFETY:
1. Bring a partner, or pair up on the spot; either way, no changing partners.
2. Register when you arrive using the Check-In Canberra app, or on paper.
3. Maintain social distancing on and off the dance-pavement.
4. Hand-sanitiser supplied.

Tango Capital – By The Lake

There will be tango! Rain is forecast tonight, but clearing tomorrow, so bring a dance partner or drop by for a chat. Covid-19-safe tango in the Tango Capital, every Tuesday throughout the summer.

DAY: Tuesdays, from 1 December to the end of February.

TIME: 5:30pm-7:30pm (unless actually raining)

WHERE: Queen Elizabeth Terrace, Parkes.In front of the Reconciliation Monument on the south bank of Lake Burley Griffin, near the Waterfront Restaurant, Parliamentary Triangle, Canberra.

Tango in the 21st century (V)

This edition explores further the many orquestas and smaller ensembles that have sprung up in Buenos Aires this century. Some are professional ensembles supporting stage shows and other tango events. Others are made up of young musicians and sadly these ensembles do not generally have a long life span, but they all bring the original tone of live tango back to the milongas while they flourish. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit: CD covers for the music acknowledged in the playlist.

Tango Capital – By The Lake

Tango music playing over the lake, a smooth surface for dancing – and all it needs it you. Bring a dance partner or drop by for a chat. Covid-19-safe tango in the Tango Capital, every Tuesday throughout the summer.

DAY: Tuesdays, from 1 December.

TIME: 5:30pm-7:30pm (unless actually raining)

WHERE: Queen Elizabeth Terrace, Parkes.In front of the Reconciliation Monument on the south bank of Lake Burley Griffin, near the Waterfront Restaurant, Parliamentary Triangle, Canberra.

Music from the De Caro brothers

Last edition looked at the professional trajectory of the De Caro brothers. While it is Julio De Caro that is remembered, and who’s birthday has been selected as “Tango Day”, he would not have been as successful without his brother Francisco. This edition explores their legacy in more detail. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: The first De Caro sextet, in 1924. Left to right: Julio De Caro (leader & cornet-violin), Francisco De Caro (piano), Pedro Maffia (bandoneón, Enrique Krauss (double bass), Pedro Laurenz (bandoneón), Emilio De Caro (violin). Image in public domain.

Tango Paradiso

The trajectory of Tango Paradiso reflects that of tango in some key ways. Listen in to explore their music, to look at the life and times of Julio De Caro, and for a quick round up of What’s On. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Tango Paradiso –  https://www.tangoparadiso.info/

Moshlo Thackrah and his partner, the flautist Carla Thackrah, formed the core of Tango Paradiso from its initial incarnation as a duo of Moshlo on violin and Daniel Rojas on piano through to quartet and sextet arrangements incorporating a range of musicians from Australia and Argentina. Marina Varney joined as singer in 2003; Nadia Piave joined as singer in 2013. From 2004 Argentine musician Facundo Bericat also undertook much of the arrangements.

Paul Hankinson (2004) and Argentine Facundo Bericat (2006) succeeded Daniel Rojas on piano, although Rojas returned in 2013. Early on Marko Deferri featured on accordion and remained through 2013; Argentinean bandoneonista Xavier Sanchez joined them in recordings made in 2006. Violinists included Joel (2002), Roland Aneney (2004), Romano Crivici (2013), and Eugenie Shaw(2009). Bassists included Andrew Shaw (2003-2009), John Varney (2004), Bella Brown (2013) and Argentine Sergio Rivas (2006). Other musicians have included Christian Gante in Australia, and Fernando Dieguez and Hugo Sanchez in Argentina.

PLAYLIST:

  • El Cabure, from lunfardo, meaning ‘The Ladies’ Man’; recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 6 December 1951; a tango with music composed by Arturo De Bassi, first recorded in 1913.  
  • Mala Pinta, meaning ‘Bad Look’, and also known as ‘Mala Estampa’; recorded by Julio De Caro on 27 August 1928; a tango with music composed by Julio De Caro & Francisco De Caro.
  • Todo Corazón, meaning ‘All Heart’; recorded by Julio De Caro in 1924; a tango with music composed by Julio De Caro   in 1921 and lyrics by José María Ruffett.  
  • Saca Chispas, meaning ‘Takes Sparks’; recorded by Julio De Caro on 10 March 1938; a milonga with music composed by Julio De Caro, and sung by Luis Díaz.  
  • Flores Negras, meaning ‘Black Flowers’; recorded by Julio De Caro on 16 September 1942; a tango with music composed by Francisco De Caro, first recorded in 1927.  
  • Mi Dolor, meaning ‘My Grief’; recorded by Julio De Caro on 27 October 1950; a tango with music composed by Carlos Marcucci, first recorded in 1926, lyrics by Orlando Verri, and sung by Orlando Verri.  
  • Volver, meaning ‘To Return’; from the collection ‘Tango Paradiso’ released in 2005, recorded by Tango Paradiso in 2004; a tango with music composed by Carlos Gardel in 1934, lyrics by Alfredo La Pera, and sung by Marina Varney.  
  • Nueve De Julio, meaning ‘9th of July’; from the collection ‘Tango Paradiso’ released in 2005, recorded by Tango Paradiso in 2004; a tango with music composed by José Luis Padula, first recorded in 1916 and lyrics by Lito Bayardo. The name is a reference to a significant day in Argentina’s struggle for independence from Spain.  
  • Boedo; from the collection ‘Argentino’ released in 2006, recorded by Tango Paradiso in 2006; a tango with music composed by Julio De Caro in 1928 and lyrics by Francisco Bautista. The name is a reference to the suburb of Boedo in Buenos Aires, which is in turn named for Mariano Boedo, a politician of the independence movement .  
  • Fievre, meaning ‘Fever’, and also known as ‘Fiebre de Tango’; from the collection ‘Tango Paradiso’ released in 2005, recorded by Tango Paradiso in 2004; a tango with music composed by Astor Piazzolla.  Composed 1955 or earlier.
  • A Don Agustín Bardi, and also known as ‘Don Agustín Bardi’; from the collection ‘Argentino’ released in 2006, recorded by Tango Paradiso in 2006; a tango with music composed by Horacio Salgán, first recorded in 1950. The name is a reference to the tango musician of that name.  
  • Corralera, from the collection ‘Argentino’ released in 2006, recorded by Tango Paradiso in 2006; a milonga with music composed by Anselmo A Aieta, first recorded in 1956. The name is a reference to a person living in the suburb of Corrales, near the stockyards of the abbotoirs that fed the beef export industry.  
  • Nocturna, meaning ‘Nocturne’; from the collection ‘Tango Paradiso’ released in 2005, recorded by Tango Paradiso in 2004; a milonga with music composed by Julián Plaza, first recorded in 1961.