Tango Paradiso

The trajectory of Tango Paradiso reflects that of tango in some key ways. Listen in to explore their music, to look at the life and times of Julio De Caro, and for a quick round up of What’s On. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Tango Paradiso –  https://www.tangoparadiso.info/

Moshlo Thackrah and his partner, the flautist Carla Thackrah, formed the core of Tango Paradiso from its initial incarnation as a duo of Moshlo on violin and Daniel Rojas on piano through to quartet and sextet arrangements incorporating a range of musicians from Australia and Argentina. Marina Varney joined as singer in 2003; Nadia Piave joined as singer in 2013. From 2004 Argentine musician Facundo Bericat also undertook much of the arrangements.

Paul Hankinson (2004) and Argentine Facundo Bericat (2006) succeeded Daniel Rojas on piano, although Rojas returned in 2013. Early on Marko Deferri featured on accordion and remained through 2013; Argentinean bandoneonista Xavier Sanchez joined them in recordings made in 2006. Violinists included Joel (2002), Roland Aneney (2004), Romano Crivici (2013), and Eugenie Shaw(2009). Bassists included Andrew Shaw (2003-2009), John Varney (2004), Bella Brown (2013) and Argentine Sergio Rivas (2006). Other musicians have included Christian Gante in Australia, and Fernando Dieguez and Hugo Sanchez in Argentina.

PLAYLIST:

  • El Cabure, from lunfardo, meaning ‘The Ladies’ Man’; recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 6 December 1951; a tango with music composed by Arturo De Bassi, first recorded in 1913.  
  • Mala Pinta, meaning ‘Bad Look’, and also known as ‘Mala Estampa’; recorded by Julio De Caro on 27 August 1928; a tango with music composed by Julio De Caro & Francisco De Caro.
  • Todo Corazón, meaning ‘All Heart’; recorded by Julio De Caro in 1924; a tango with music composed by Julio De Caro   in 1921 and lyrics by José María Ruffett.  
  • Saca Chispas, meaning ‘Takes Sparks’; recorded by Julio De Caro on 10 March 1938; a milonga with music composed by Julio De Caro, and sung by Luis Díaz.  
  • Flores Negras, meaning ‘Black Flowers’; recorded by Julio De Caro on 16 September 1942; a tango with music composed by Francisco De Caro, first recorded in 1927.  
  • Mi Dolor, meaning ‘My Grief’; recorded by Julio De Caro on 27 October 1950; a tango with music composed by Carlos Marcucci, first recorded in 1926, lyrics by Orlando Verri, and sung by Orlando Verri.  
  • Volver, meaning ‘To Return’; from the collection ‘Tango Paradiso’ released in 2005, recorded by Tango Paradiso in 2004; a tango with music composed by Carlos Gardel in 1934, lyrics by Alfredo La Pera, and sung by Marina Varney.  
  • Nueve De Julio, meaning ‘9th of July’; from the collection ‘Tango Paradiso’ released in 2005, recorded by Tango Paradiso in 2004; a tango with music composed by José Luis Padula, first recorded in 1916 and lyrics by Lito Bayardo. The name is a reference to a significant day in Argentina’s struggle for independence from Spain.  
  • Boedo; from the collection ‘Argentino’ released in 2006, recorded by Tango Paradiso in 2006; a tango with music composed by Julio De Caro in 1928 and lyrics by Francisco Bautista. The name is a reference to the suburb of Boedo in Buenos Aires, which is in turn named for Mariano Boedo, a politician of the independence movement .  
  • Fievre, meaning ‘Fever’, and also known as ‘Fiebre de Tango’; from the collection ‘Tango Paradiso’ released in 2005, recorded by Tango Paradiso in 2004; a tango with music composed by Astor Piazzolla.  Composed 1955 or earlier.
  • A Don Agustín Bardi, and also known as ‘Don Agustín Bardi’; from the collection ‘Argentino’ released in 2006, recorded by Tango Paradiso in 2006; a tango with music composed by Horacio Salgán, first recorded in 1950. The name is a reference to the tango musician of that name.  
  • Corralera, from the collection ‘Argentino’ released in 2006, recorded by Tango Paradiso in 2006; a milonga with music composed by Anselmo A Aieta, first recorded in 1956. The name is a reference to a person living in the suburb of Corrales, near the stockyards of the abbotoirs that fed the beef export industry.  
  • Nocturna, meaning ‘Nocturne’; from the collection ‘Tango Paradiso’ released in 2005, recorded by Tango Paradiso in 2004; a milonga with music composed by Julián Plaza, first recorded in 1961.  

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