Contemporary Tango

2018-07-26 - Tango Emilio Balcarce School Orchestra playing at the 2010 Mundial finals

This edition it’s back to tango, and of the Argentine variety, but this time a special on modern tango orquestas. These young musicians are highly trained professional musicians schooled in the structures of masters such as Caló and Troilo, Pugliese and D’Arienzo, playing and recording danceable tango music live around Buenos Aires. Tango did not die in 1955; it just took a break for a few decades, and now it is evolving as a living thing again. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Tango Emilio Balcarce School Orchestra playing at the 2010 Mundial finals

PLAYLIST:

  • Este Es El Rey, meaning ‘This Is The King’; recorded by La Juan D’Arienzo in 2014; a tango with music composed by Carlos Ángel Lázzari, Manuel Antonio Caballero, and Juan Polito, first recorded in 1971.
  • Felicia; recorded by La Juan D’Arienzo in 2014; a tango with music composed by Enrique Saborido, first recorded in 1927 and lyrics by Carlos Mauricio Pacheco. The name is a reference to a woman’s name.
  • Paciencia, meaning ‘Patience’; recorded by La Juan D’Arienzo in 2014; a tango with music composed by Juan D’Arienzo in 1937 and lyrics by Francisco Gorrindo.
  • Pregonera, meaning ‘Proclaimer’; recorded by Orquesta Victoria in 2010; a tango with music composed by Alfredo De Angelis in 1945 and lyrics by José Rótulo.
  • Flores Negras, meaning ‘Black Flowers’; recorded by Orquesta Victoria in 2010; a tango with music composed by Francisco De Caro, first recorded in 1927 and lyrics by Mario Gomila.
  • Cambalache, meaning ‘Junk Shop’; recorded by Orquesta Victoria in 2010; a tango with music and lyrics composed by Enrique Santos Discépolo in 1934. The name is a reference to the social and political environment of Argentina.
  • A Evaristo Carriego, meaning ‘To Evaristo Carriego’; recorded by Ojos de Tango in 2010; a tango with music composed by Eduardo Rovira, first recorded in 1969. The name is a reference to the poet Evarista Carriego, who inspired many early tango writers.
  • La Mariposa, meaning ‘The Butterfly’; recorded by Ojos de Tango in 2010; a tango with music composed by Pedro Maffia in 1921 and lyrics by Celedonio Flores.
  • Silbando, meaning ‘Whistling’; recorded by Ojos de Tango in 2010; a tango with music composed by Cátulo Castillo, and Sebastián Piana in 1923 and lyrics by José González Castillo (Juan de León).
  • El Marne; recorded by Sexteto Gato in 2013; a tango with music composed by Eduardo Arolas, first recorded in 1920 and lyrics by Gabriel Clausi.
  • Añoranzas, meaning ‘Annoyances’; recorded by Sexteto Gato in 2013; a tango with music composed by Luis Petrucelli, first recorded in 1939 and lyrics by Daniel López Barreto.
  • Inspiración, meaning ‘Inspiration’; recorded by Sexteto Gato in 2013; a tango with music composed by Peregrino Paulos in 1929 and lyrics by Luis Rubistein.
  • Danzarín, meaning ‘Dancer’; recorded by Sexteto Unitango in 2009; a tango with music composed by Julián Plaza, first recorded in 1958.
  • Trenzas, meaning ‘Braids’; recorded by Sexteto Unitango in 2009; a tango with music composed by Armando Pontier in 1944 and lyrics by Homero Expósito. The name is a reference to a woman’s hair.
  • Canaro En Paris, meaning ‘Canaro In Paris’; recorded by Sexteto Unitango in 2009; a tango with music composed by Alejandro Scarpino and Juan Caldarella, first recorded in 1927 and lyrics by José Antonio Scarpino.
  • Mi Dolor, meaning ‘My Sadness’; recorded by Orquesta Típica Misteriosa in 2013; a tango with music composed by Carlos Marcucci, first recorded in 1926 and lyrics by Manuel Meaños.
  • Sábado Inglés, meaning ‘English Saturday’; recorded by Orquesta Típica Misteriosa in 2013; a tango with music composed by Juan Félix Maglio, first recorded in 1920 and lyrics by Eugenio Cárdenas. The name is a reference to the English custom of only working a half-day on Saturdays, a custom imported into Argentina when British firms were contracted to build railway lines.

Finnish Tango – the music

2018-07-22 - Symbols of Finland

Last edition took a look at the history of Finnish tango and some of the distinguishing features of the music and dance that mark it out as a descendent of  the Northern hemisphere’s early response to tango – the Ballroom Tango. This edition will look at the music in more depth through a range of singers. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credits: Flag – Janne Karaste; Coat of Arms – By Vzb83 – Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=560472

PLAYLIST:

  • Illan Viimeinen Tango, meaning ‘Evening Time Tango’; recorded in 1959; with music and lyrics composed by Hatara Aarne, and sung by Eino Grön.
  • Särkymeitä Toiveita, meaning ‘Arms Of Hope’; recorded in 1973; with music composed by U Mattila, and sung by Eino Grön.
  • Elsa, Kohtalon Lapsi, meaning ‘Elsa, Child of Fate’; recorded in 1967; with music composed by P Naseva (born Erik Lindström), lyrics by T Kutvonen, and sung by Martti Innanen. This song was actually released as a parody, but went on to become a bit of a hit in the tango community.
  • Kohtalon Tango, meaning ‘Tango Of Fate’; recorded in 1996; with music composed by Riku Niemi, Saukki, and Unto Mononen, and sung by Arja Koriseva.
  • Tango Pelargonia, meaning ‘Geranium Tango’; recorded in 1997; with music composed by K Kuuva, and sung by Kari Kuuva. This song was actually released as a parody, but went on to become a big hit in the tango community.
  • Unikuva; recorded in 1974; with music composed by Kullervo Linna and Kullervo, and sung by Annikki Tahti.
  • Lapin Tango, meaning ‘Tango of Lappland’; with music composed by Unto Mononen. Unknown recording date but must be before 1968, the year that Unto Mononen died; possibly around 1959, when he played guitar in his own ensemble.
  • Sirkkjen Tanssi, meaning ‘Circus Dance’; with music composed by Unto Mononen. Unknown recording date but must be before 1968, the year that Unto Mononen died; possibly around 1959, when he played guitar in his own ensemble.
  • Hiljainen Kylätie, meaning ‘Quiet Village Road’; recorded by Metro-Tytöt (the ‘Metro Girls’) in 1956; with music composed by Reino Helismaa, Toivo Kärki, Orvokki Itä, and Pedro De Punta.
  • Tähdet Meren Yllä, meaning ‘Stars Over The Sea’; recorded in 1962; with music composed by Unto Mononen, and sung by Reijo Taipale.
  • Yön Tummat Siivet, meaning ‘Dark Wings of Night’; recorded in 1966; with music composed by Unto Mononen, and sung by Reijo Taipale with Kullervo Castle’s orchestra.
  • Hopeinen Kuu, meaning ‘Silvery Moon’; recorded in 1967; with music composed by Reino Helismaa, Saukki, Jaakko Salo, Gualtiero Malgoni, Kari Tuomisaari, and Tauni Kouta, and sung by Olavi Virta.
  • Täysikuu, meaning ‘Full Moon’; recorded in 1968; with music composed by Reino Helismaa, Toivo Kärki, Orvokki Itä, and Pedro De Punta, and sung by Olavi Virta.
  • Aamunkoi, meaning ‘Aurora’; music composed by Unto Mononen; sung by Henry Theel with the Decca Orkesteri.
  • Polttava Kalpaus, meaning ‘Burning Calf’; music composed by Unto Mononen; sung by Henry Theel with the Rytmi Orkesteri.
  • Yö Ikkunan Takana, meaning ‘Night Behind The Window’; recorded by Tango Orkesteri Unto in 2010; with music composed by Unto Mononen, lyrics by Unto Mononen and Solja Tuuli, and sung by Pirjo Aittomäki.

Finnish Tango – the history

2018-07-15 - Finland

Tango has been integral to Finland for over a hundred years,and this week one of the largest tango festivals in the world kicks off again as 100,000 people descend on the town of Seinäjoki for the annual Tangomarkkinat to dance the Finnish variety of tango that developed in isolation for much of the 20th century. Find out about Finnish tango and check out Tangalo’s recent performances in Canberra this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: The flag of Finland marks out the country on the map

PLAYLIST:

  • Alma De Bohemia, from Pedro Laurenz, recorded on 15 July 1943 with Alberto Podestá singing, a tango originally written in 1928 by Roberto Firpo and with lyrics by Juan Andres Caruso.
  • Liljankukka, meaning ‘Lily Flower’, a Finnish tango sung by Henry Theel in 1945.
  • Satumaa, meaning ‘Fairyland’; a Finnish tango sung by Reijo Taipale in 1962, and composed by Unto Mononen, a significant early composer of Finnish tango.
  • Punatukkaiselle Tytolleni, meaning ‘To My Red-Headed Girl’; composed by Olavi Virta and here sung by him in 1967.
  • Tangon Kotimaa, meaning ‘Homeland of Tango’; a Finnish tango from  Tango-orkesteri Unto, recorded in 2010 with Pirjo Aittomäki singing, composed in 1996 by Taisto Wesslin and with lyrics by Pauli Ylitalo.
  • La Yumba, a tango from Osvaldo Pugliese, written by him and then recorded by him on 26 December at the Colon Theatre in Buenos Aires.
  • Milonga Del Ángel, meaning ‘Dance Of The Angel’; recorded by Astor Piazzolla in 1985; a concierto with music composed by Astor Piazzolla in 1965.

Otros Ritmos

2018-07-07 - Foxtrot pressing by Carabelli 1927

This week features the second of a two-part special on the legacy from Argentine tango orquestas of music that is not tango. Tango evolved in the relative isolation of the 19th century, but by the 20th century steamers, recordings, and radio shattered that isolation and brought new sounds, new dances, and new instrumentation to Argentina. Astute band leaders such as Canaro, Rodriguez, and Lomuto regularly incorporated jazz instrumentation into their tango music, and they recorded many dances imported from the UK and the rest of the Americas. This is a selection of 20th century dance rhythms as interpreted by Rodriguez, including paso doble and foxtrot. That’s Tango Capital this Sunday evening from 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image credit:  a 1927 foxtrot pressing from Carabelli: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_vGpPegEeU

PLAYLIST:

  • La Calesita Se Destrozo, meaning ‘The Carousel Was Destroyed’; recorded by Enrique Rodríguez on 10 November 1937; a foxtrot with music and lyrics composed by Cliff Friend and Dave Franklin, and sung by Roberto Flores.
  • Esa Muchacha, meaning ‘This Girl’; recorded by Enrique Rodríguez on 7 December 1955; a foxtrot with music and lyrics composed by Oscar Kinleiner, and sung by Omar Quiroz.
  • Hay Que Aprender A Bailar, meaning ‘You Have To Learn To Dance’; recorded by Enrique Rodríguez on 19 March 1957; a foxtrot with music composed by Francisco Lomuto, lyrics by Andrés Lorenzo Seitún, and sung by Omar Quiroz.
  • Frente A Frente, meaning ‘Face To Face’; recorded by Enrique Rodríguez on 11 May 1956; a foxtrot with music composed by Juan Quintero, lyrics by Quiroga, and sung by Omar Quiroz. It’s a foxtrot arrangement of Donato’s earlier classic tango.
  • La Leyenda Del Beso, meaning ‘The Legend Of The Kiss’; recorded by Enrique Rodríguez on 27 April 1956; a foxtrot with music composed by Juan Vert Carbonell and Reveriano Soutullo Otero. It’s a foxtrot arrangement of music from the 1924 Spanish operetta of the same name
  • Devuelveme Mi Corazón, meaning ‘Return My Heart’; recorded by Enrique Rodríguez on 31 July 1946; a foxtrot with music composed by José Mazzitelli, lyrics by Fernando Torres, and sung by Ricardo Herrera.
  • Pero Hay Una Melena, meaning ‘But There Is A Mane’; recorded by Enrique Rodríguez on 13 July 1953; a foxtrot with music and lyrics composed by José Bohr , and sung by Omar Quiroz. The song dates from 1924 and deplores the fashion trend of women bobbing their hair short, extolling instead a traditionally long “mane” of hair as a properly womanly appearance.
  • La Colegiala, meaning ‘The Schoolgirl’; recorded by Enrique Rodríguez on 23 March 1938; a foxtrot with music composed by Antonio Matas Mir, and sung by Roberto Flores.
  • Encantador de Serpientes, meaning ‘Snake Charmer’; recorded by Enrique Rodríguez on 5 June 1939; a foxtrot with music composed by Teddy Powell, lyrics by Leonard Whitcup, and sung by Roberto Flores.
  • Isabel; recorded by Enrique Rodríguez on 25 April 1946; a foxtrot with music composed by Adrián Russo, lyrics by Mario Battistella, and sung by Ricardo Herrera. The title is a reference to a woman of that name.
  • Titina; recorded by Enrique Rodríguez on 11 March 1955; a foxtrot with music composed by Leo Daniderff, and sung by Omar Quiroz. The title is a reference to a woman of that name.
  • Adiós Pilar; recorded by Enrique Rodríguez on 26 September 1946; a pasodoble with music composed by Manual Jovés, and sung by Fernando Reyes.
  • Castañuelas, meaning ‘Castanets’; recorded by Enrique Rodríguez on 11 July 1947; a pasodoble with music composed by Alfredo Marengo, lyrics by José A Zatzkin, and sung by Ricardo Herrera.
  • Chacarero, meaning ‘Farm Worker’; recorded by Enrique Rodríguez on 16 January 1948; a pasodoble with music composed by Filinto Rebehi and Aguariguay Alfas, lyrics by Carlos Bahr, and sung by Ricardo Herrera.
  • La Buenaventura, meaning ‘Good Fortune’; recorded by Enrique Rodríguez on 27 January 1949; a pasodoble with music composed by Ramón Montes, and sung by Ricardo Herrera.
  • El Vito; recorded by Enrique Rodríguez on 11 May 1956; a pasodoble with music composed by Sandiago Lope Gonzalo.
  • Puñal Sevillano, meaning ‘Dagger Of Seville’; recorded by Enrique Rodríguez on 19 March 1957; a pasodoble with music composed by Martin Torrellas and lyrics by A Piangarelli.
  • Oh París; recorded by Enrique Rodríguez on 21 June 1948; a foxtrot with music composed by Jose Bohr, lyrics by Juan Andres Caruso, and sung by Ricardo Herrera. The title is a reference to the city of Paris, the city that so many wealthy Argentinians visited and admired.