Contemporary Tango

2018-07-26 - Tango Emilio Balcarce School Orchestra playing at the 2010 Mundial finals

This edition it’s back to tango, and of the Argentine variety, but this time a special on modern tango orquestas. These young musicians are highly trained professional musicians schooled in the structures of masters such as Caló and Troilo, Pugliese and D’Arienzo, playing and recording danceable tango music live around Buenos Aires. Tango did not die in 1955; it just took a break for a few decades, and now it is evolving as a living thing again. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Tango Emilio Balcarce School Orchestra playing at the 2010 Mundial finals

PLAYLIST:

  • Este Es El Rey, meaning ‘This Is The King’; recorded by La Juan D’Arienzo in 2014; a tango with music composed by Carlos Ángel Lázzari, Manuel Antonio Caballero, and Juan Polito, first recorded in 1971.
  • Felicia; recorded by La Juan D’Arienzo in 2014; a tango with music composed by Enrique Saborido, first recorded in 1927 and lyrics by Carlos Mauricio Pacheco. The name is a reference to a woman’s name.
  • Paciencia, meaning ‘Patience’; recorded by La Juan D’Arienzo in 2014; a tango with music composed by Juan D’Arienzo in 1937 and lyrics by Francisco Gorrindo.
  • Pregonera, meaning ‘Proclaimer’; recorded by Orquesta Victoria in 2010; a tango with music composed by Alfredo De Angelis in 1945 and lyrics by José Rótulo.
  • Flores Negras, meaning ‘Black Flowers’; recorded by Orquesta Victoria in 2010; a tango with music composed by Francisco De Caro, first recorded in 1927 and lyrics by Mario Gomila.
  • Cambalache, meaning ‘Junk Shop’; recorded by Orquesta Victoria in 2010; a tango with music and lyrics composed by Enrique Santos Discépolo in 1934. The name is a reference to the social and political environment of Argentina.
  • A Evaristo Carriego, meaning ‘To Evaristo Carriego’; recorded by Ojos de Tango in 2010; a tango with music composed by Eduardo Rovira, first recorded in 1969. The name is a reference to the poet Evarista Carriego, who inspired many early tango writers.
  • La Mariposa, meaning ‘The Butterfly’; recorded by Ojos de Tango in 2010; a tango with music composed by Pedro Maffia in 1921 and lyrics by Celedonio Flores.
  • Silbando, meaning ‘Whistling’; recorded by Ojos de Tango in 2010; a tango with music composed by Cátulo Castillo, and Sebastián Piana in 1923 and lyrics by José González Castillo (Juan de León).
  • El Marne; recorded by Sexteto Gato in 2013; a tango with music composed by Eduardo Arolas, first recorded in 1920 and lyrics by Gabriel Clausi.
  • Añoranzas, meaning ‘Annoyances’; recorded by Sexteto Gato in 2013; a tango with music composed by Luis Petrucelli, first recorded in 1939 and lyrics by Daniel López Barreto.
  • Inspiración, meaning ‘Inspiration’; recorded by Sexteto Gato in 2013; a tango with music composed by Peregrino Paulos in 1929 and lyrics by Luis Rubistein.
  • Danzarín, meaning ‘Dancer’; recorded by Sexteto Unitango in 2009; a tango with music composed by Julián Plaza, first recorded in 1958.
  • Trenzas, meaning ‘Braids’; recorded by Sexteto Unitango in 2009; a tango with music composed by Armando Pontier in 1944 and lyrics by Homero Expósito. The name is a reference to a woman’s hair.
  • Canaro En Paris, meaning ‘Canaro In Paris’; recorded by Sexteto Unitango in 2009; a tango with music composed by Alejandro Scarpino and Juan Caldarella, first recorded in 1927 and lyrics by José Antonio Scarpino.
  • Mi Dolor, meaning ‘My Sadness’; recorded by Orquesta Típica Misteriosa in 2013; a tango with music composed by Carlos Marcucci, first recorded in 1926 and lyrics by Manuel Meaños.
  • Sábado Inglés, meaning ‘English Saturday’; recorded by Orquesta Típica Misteriosa in 2013; a tango with music composed by Juan Félix Maglio, first recorded in 1920 and lyrics by Eugenio Cárdenas. The name is a reference to the English custom of only working a half-day on Saturdays, a custom imported into Argentina when British firms were contracted to build railway lines.

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