An evening of vals

2020-03-25 - The Mandelbrot vals

With tango events cancelled for the foreseeable future, this week brings you another opportunity to dance at home. This week it’s an invitation to practice your vals skills. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Ann Smith: The Mandelbrot vals.

PLAYLIST:

2020-03-29 - Playlist

Tango For Dancing

2020-03-18 - TFD - BWR 3

Put the COVID-19 outbreak behind you this Sunday, and dance with your partner on the kitchen floor as Tango Capital returns to play the fourth Sunday of the month broadcasting a milonguita playlist for dancers, whereever they are. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

PLAYLIST:

2020-03-22 - Playlist

 

Yuko Kinoshia, DJ

2020-03-12 - Yuko Kinoshita DJing at El Boliche on 21 Jan 2019

Yuko Kinoshita shares her experiences of DJing traditional tango music for milongas around Australia. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit: Ann Smith; Yuko Kinoshita DJing at El Boliche milonga on 21 January 2019.

PLAYLIST:

  • Tus Labios Me Dirán, meaning ‘Your Lips Will Tell Me’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 15 October 1945; a tango with music composed by Emilio Brameri, lyrics by Héctor Marcó, and sung by Alberto Amor.
  • Se Fue, meaning ‘He Went’; recorded by Lucio Demare on 13 October 1943; a vals with music composed by Horacio Salgán in 1943, lyrics by Oscar Rubens, and sung by Raúl Berón.
  • Mala Junta, meaning ‘Bad Company’; recorded by Julio De Caro on 16 November 1938; a tango with music composed by Julio De Caro & Pedro Laurenz in 1927 and lyrics by Juan Miguel Velich.
  • Pena Mulata, meaning ‘Grief Of The Afro-Argentine Woman’; recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 28 February 1941; a milonga with music composed by Sebastián Piana in 1941, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Roberto Rufino.
  • Si Soy Así, meaning ‘Yes, I’m Like That’; recorded by Francisco Lomuto on 14 June 1933; a tango with music composed by Francisco Lomuto in 1933, lyrics by Antonio Botta, and sung by Fernando Díaz.
  • Consejo De Oro, meaning ‘Golden Advice’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 27 February 1946; a tango with music composed by Arquímedes Arci, first recorded in 1933, lyrics by Arquímedes Arci, and sung by Roberto Chanel.
  • Escucháme Manón, meaning ‘Listen To Me’, and also known as ‘Indiferencia’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 10 June 1947; a tango with music composed by Francisco Pracánico, lyrics by Roberto Chanel & Claudio Frollo, and sung by Roberto Chanel.
  • Rondando Tu Esquina, meaning ‘Hanging Around Your Corner’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 18 July 1945; a tango with music composed by Charlo, lyrics by Enrique Cadícámo, and sung by Roberto Chanel.
  • Fuimos, meaning ‘We Were’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 28 March 1946; a tango with music composed by José Dames, first recorded in 1945, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Roberto Chanel.

 

Carlos Dante – singer

2020-03-06 -Carlos Dante

Last edition took a brief look at the professional life of Carlos Dante, and this edition explores their legacy of compositions and recordings with Caló, the Canaros Francisco and Rafael, and of course with De Angelis.. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit: https://www.todotango.com/english/artists/info/179/Carlos-Dante

PLAYLIST:

  • Mamá Yo Quiero Un Novio, meaning ‘Mama, I Want A Boyfriend’; recorded by Rafael Canaro in 1929; a tango with music composed by Ramón Collazo in 1928, lyrics by Roberto Fontaina, and sung by Carlos Dante and Rafael Canaro.
  • TBC, and also known as ‘Te Bese’; recorded by Rafael Canaro in 1929; a tango with music composed by Edgardo Donato in 1928, lyrics by Roberto Fontaina & Víctor Soliño, and sung by Carlos Dante and Rafael Canaro.
  • Ya No Cantas, Chingolo, meaning ‘You Don’t Sing Anymore, Little Bird’; recorded by Rafael Canaro in 1929; a tango with music composed by Antonio Scatasso in 1928, lyrics by Edmundo Bianchi, and sung by Carlos Dante and Rafael Canaro. The name is a reference to a small reddish-brown bird of the pampa as a symbol of the pampa lifestyle.
  • Como Palo ‘e Gallinero; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 24 November 1932; a ranchera with music composed by Rafael Rossi, lyrics by Francisco Brancatti, and sung by Carlos Dante and Ángel Ramos.
  • Quien Tuviera 20 Abriles, meaning ‘Who Is 20 Years Old?’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 24 November 1932; a tango sung by Carlos Dante.
  • Recuerdos Del Pasado, meaning ‘Memories Of The Past’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 24 November 1932; a tango with music composed by Enrique Delfino, lyrics by Enrique Delfino, and sung by Carlos Dante.
  • Serenata Criolla, meaning ‘Creole Serenade’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 24 November 1932; a ranchera with music composed by Antonio Molina, and sung by Carlos Dante and Ángel Ramos.
  • No Vale La Pena, meaning ‘Not Worth It’; recorded by Miguel Caló on 5 October 1934; a tango with music composed by Antonio Helú, lyrics by Antonio Helú, and sung by Carlos Dante.
  • Alma Mía, meaning ‘My Soul’; recorded by Miguel Caló on 17 December 1935; a tango with music composed by Domingo Cuestas, lyrics by Mario Gomila, and sung by Carlos Dante and Hermanas Morel.
  • Caballo De Calesita, meaning ‘Merry-Go-Round Horse’; recorded by Miguel Caló on 14 March 1936; a tango with music composed by Miguel Nijensohn & Pedro Pandolfi, lyrics by Carlos Marín, and sung by Carlos Dante.
  • Patrona, meaning ‘Patron Saint’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 29 May 1951; a milonga with music composed by Juan Larenza, lyrics by Cátulo Castillo, and sung by Carlos Dante.
  • Esta Noche Me Despido, meaning ‘Tonight I Say Good-bye’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 12 May 1949; a tango with music composed by Carlos Dante, lyrics by José Rótulo, and sung by Carlos Dante.
  • Por Eso Te Quiero, meaning ‘That’s Why I Love You’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 18 December 1953; a tango with music composed by Carlos Dante, lyrics by Reinaldo Yiso, and sung by Carlos Dante.
  • Tu Pollera Azul, meaning ‘Your Blue Skirt’; a tango with music composed by Carlos Dante & Victor Braña & Reinaldo Yiso, lyrics by Carlos Dante & Victor Braña & Reinaldo Yiso, and sung by Carlos Dante.
  • El Retrato De Los Viejos, meaning ‘The Portrait Of The Old Folk’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 29 October 1956; a tango with music composed by Carlos Dante, lyrics by Jesús Otero, and sung by Oscar Larocca.
  • A Magaldi, meaning ‘To Magaldi’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 21 October 1947; a vals with music composed by Carlos Dante & Pedro Noda, lyrics by Juan Bernardo Tiggi, and sung by Carlos Dante and Julio Martel. The title is a reference to the death of Agustín Magaldi, singer, and composer who died in 1938.
  • Selección De Valses, meaning ‘Selection Of Waltzes’; recorded by Francini-Pontier on 4 December 1953; a vals with music composed by Carlos Dante & Francisco Canaro, first recorded in 1952 and lyrics by Ivo Pelay & Juan Bernardo Tiggi. The valses making up this medley are Una Lágrima, A Mi Madre, Desde el Alma, Palomita Blanca, Amor y Cielo, and Un Placer.
  • Primer Beso, meaning ‘First Kiss’; recorded by Francini-Pontier on 4 February 1948; a vals with music composed by Carlos Dante & Pedro Noda, lyrics by Héctor Gagliardi, and sung by Raúl Berón and Roberto Rufino.

 

Tango Enigmático

 

2020-02-26 - Tango Enigmatico BNE 5 May 2019

There’s a report on Tango Enigmático‘s second outing, we check out What’s On for tango around the region, and the singer Carlos Dante features.   That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit:  Ann Smith. Tango Enigmático bringing the new and the old together last year; they were joined by Tango Paradiso singer Marina Varney at The Glasshouse, Brisbane, on 5 May 2019. Check out a preview here.

PLAYLIST:

  • El Criollito Oriental, meaning ‘Kid From Uruguay’; recorded by Pedro Laurenz on 1 March 1944; a milonga with music composed by Alberto Mastra, lyrics by Alberto Mastra, and sung by Alberto Podestá. Uruguay was the most eastern of the provinces of the Spanish Empire in South America and its official name is the Oriental Republic of Uruguay. The title of the song more accurately translates as ‘The Young Man Of Uruguay’.
  • Mocosita, meaning ‘Young Girl’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 20 April 1949; a tango with music composed by Gerardo Matos Rodríguez in 1926, lyrics by Victor Soliño, and sung by Carlos Dante. Meaning ‘brat’, the title is a term of endearment for a young girl, although it all ends badly for the payador who loves her.
  • Engominado, meaning ‘Pimped’; recorded by Juan D’Arienzo in 1928; a tango with music composed by Fernando Montoni, first recorded in 1928, lyrics by Maximo José Orsi, and sung by Carlos Dante. Literally meaning ‘Gummed’, in reference to the brilliantine hair pomade worn by young men in the early part of the 20th century; ‘Pimped’ is more meaningful in the 21st century.
  • El Carrerito, meaning ‘The Carter’; recorded by Rafael Canaro in 1929; a tango with music composed by Raúl Joaquín De Los Hoyos in 1928, lyrics by Alberto Vacarezza, and sung by Carlos Dante.
  • Soñar Y Nada Más, meaning ‘To Dream And Nothing More’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 29 August 1944; a vals with music composed by Francisco Canaro, first recorded in 1943, lyrics by Ivo Pelay, and sung by Carlos Dante and Julio Martel.
  • Soy Un Arlequin, meaning ‘I Am A Harlequin’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 11 September 1945; a tango with music composed by Enrique Santos Discépolo in 1928, lyrics by Enrique Santos Discépolo, and sung by Carlos Dante.
  • Immensidad, meaning ‘Immensity’; recorded live from a performance by Tango Enigmático at The Glasshouse, Brisbane on 5 May 2019; a concierto with music composed by Exequiel Mantega.
  • Hecho Por Mano, meaning ‘Made By Hand’; recorded live from a performance by Tango Enigmático at The Glasshouse, Brisbane on 5 May 2019; a concierto with music composed by Owen Salome. Written in rural Victoria and urban Buenos Aires by Australian composer Owen Salome.
  • La Puñalada, meaning ‘The Knife-stabbing’; recorded live from a performance by Tango Enigmático at The Glasshouse, Brisbane on 5 May 2019; a milonga with music composed by Pintín Castellanos in 1933 and lyrics by Celadonio Flores
  •  A Evaristo Carriego; recorded live from a performance by Tango Enigmático at The Glasshouse, Brisbane on 5 May 2019; a concierto with music composed by Eduardo Rovira, first recorded in 1969. The name is a reference to Evaristo Carriego, the nationalist Argentine poet who also influenced tango lyrics.

 

Carlos Acuña

2020-02-13 - Carlos Acuna

Think tango singer and the conversational canción of Carlos Gardel or of Roberto Goyeneche may come to mind and of course the majority of female singers performed this genre. Or perhaps it was the tango bailable of Alberto Podestá or Alberto Castillo that came to mind. While the majority of tango singers specialised in one or other genre, Carlos Acuña was comfortable working in both. Last edition took a brief look at his life and this edition explores their recording legacy in more detail. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit: http://humilitan.blogspot.com/search/label/Carlos%20Acu%C3%B1a

PLAYLIST:

  • Cuando El Amor Muere, meaning ‘When Love Dies’, and also known as ‘When Love Dies’; recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 2 August 1941; a tango with music composed by Alfredo Malerba in 1941, lyrics by Héctor Marcó, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Adiós Te Vas, meaning ‘Goodbye’, and also known as ‘Goodbye’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 24 August 1943; a tango with music composed by Egidio Pittaluga, lyrics by Cátulo Castillo, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Barrio Reo, from lunfardo, meaning ‘Humble Neighbourhood’, and also known as ‘Humble Neighbourhood’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 29 April 1943; a tango with music composed by Roberto Fugazot in 1927, lyrics by Alfredo Navarrine, and sung by Carlos Acuña. The name is a reference to the suburb or neighbourhood in which the singer grew up.
  • Canción De Rango, meaning ‘Song Of The Range’, and also known as ‘Pa’ Que Se Callen’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 29 April 1943; a tango with music composed by Raúl Kaplún, first recorded in 1942, lyrics by José María Suñe, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Soy Del Noventa , meaning ‘I Am Of The 90s’, and also known as ‘Soy Del 90’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 8 July 1943; a milonga with music composed by Tito Ribero, lyrics by Carlos Waiss, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Lonjazos , from lunfardo; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 7 December 1943; a tango with music composed by Andrés Domenech in 1932, lyrics by Jesús Fernández Blanco, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Yo Tengo Un Puñal, meaning ‘I Have A Knife’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 3 March 1943; a tango with music composed by Luís Moresco, lyrics by José Demetrio Terragno, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Sosiego En La Noche, meaning ‘Peace In The Night’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 30 May 1944; a tango with music composed by Roverto Garza in 1943, lyrics by Carlos Bahr, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • A Suerte Y Verdad, meaning ‘To Luck And Truth’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 11 August 1944; a tango with music composed by Carlos M Parodi, lyrics by Carlos Waiss, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Tu Voz, meaning ‘Your Voice’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 9 May 1944; a tango with music composed by Juan Antonio Migliore, lyrics by Fermin Carballeda, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Sueño De Juventud, meaning ‘Dreams Of Youth’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 11 April 1944; a vals with music composed by Enrique Santos Discépolo in 1931, lyrics by Enrique Santos Discépolo, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Cada Vez Que Mi Recuerdes, meaning ‘Every Time You Remember’; recorded by Mariano Mores on 8 April 1957; a tango with music composed by Mariano Mores , first recorded in 1943, lyrics by José María Contursi, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Lejana Tierra Mía, meaning ‘My Land Afar’; recorded by Mariano Mores on 16 January 1960; a tango with music composed by Carlos Gardel, first recorded in 1935, lyrics by Alfredo Le Pera, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • La Canción, meaning ‘The Song’, and also known as ‘Flor de mburucuyá’; recorded by Mariano Mores on 16 January 1960; a tango with music composed by Juan de Dios Filiberto, first recorded in 1959, lyrics by Lito Bayardo, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Mulatada; recorded by Mariano Mores on 11 August 1958; a candombe with music composed by Mariano Mores , lyrics by Cátulo Castillo, and sung by Carlos Acuña and Aldo Campoamor. The name is a reference to Afro-Argentine music.
  • La Flor De Canela, meaning ‘Cinnamon Flower’; recorded by Mariano Mores on 11 August 1958; a vals with music composed by Isabel Granda, first recorded in 1957, lyrics by Isabel Granda, and sung by Carlos Acuña and Aldo Campoamor.
  • El Día Que Me Quieras, meaning ‘The Day That You Love Me’; recorded by Mariano Mores on 20 January 1970; a tango with music composed by Carlos Gardel in 1935, lyrics by Alfredo Le Pera, and sung by Carlos Acuña.
  • Mi Buenos Aires Querido, meaning ‘My Beloved Buenos Aires’;; a tango with music composed by Carlos Gardel in 1934, lyrics by Alfredo Le Pera, and sung by Carlos Acuña.   Acuña recorded this song as early as 1962, but not with Mariano Mores orquesta. Given the orchestral backing this version may be recorded by Martin Darré and his orchestra in Spain some time in the 1970s or 1980s.