Erika Mordek, DJ

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This edition introduces Canberran tango teacher Erika Mordek and her views on DJing tango music in both teaching and milonga contexts. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit: Peter Dall; Erika Mordek teaching at the National Folk Festival 2016

PLAYLIST:

  • Ella Es Así, meaning ‘She Is Like That’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 10 October 1938; a milonga with music composed by Luis Martino, lyrics by Manuel Carretero, and sung by Horacio Lagos.
  • Soñar Y Nada Más, meaning ‘To Dream And Nothing More’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 5 May 1943; a vals with music composed by Francisco Canaro, lyrics by Ivo Pelay, and sung by Carlos Roldán and Eduardo Adrián.
  • Cacareando, meaning ‘Bragging’; recorded by Orquesta Típica Victor on 14 July 1933; a milonga with music composed by Antonio Sureda, lyrics by Gerónimo Sureda, and sung by Carlos Lafuente.
  • Yo Tengo Una Novia, meaning ‘I Have A Girlfriend’; recorded by Ángel D’Agostino on 17 November 1942; a vals with music composed by Rosendo Pesoa and Diego Centeno, lyrics by Héctor Marcó, and sung by Ángel Vargas.
  • Amor Y Celos, meaning ‘Love And Jealousy’, and also known as ‘Amor Y Celo’; recorded by Juan D’Arienzo on 3 September 1936; a vals with music composed by Miguel Padula, first recorded in 1928 and lyrics by Alfredo Faustino Roldán.
  • Esquinas Porteñas, meaning ‘Street Corners Of Buenos Aires’; recorded by Ángel D’Agostino on 22 May 1942; a vals with music composed by Sebastián Piana, first recorded in 1932, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Ángel Vargas.
  • Milonga Criolla, meaning ‘Milonga Of Argentina’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 6 October 1936; a milonga with music composed by Alberto Soifer, lyrics by Manuel Romero, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Milonga De Mis Amores, meaning ‘Milonga Of My Loves’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 26 May 1937; a milonga with music composed by Pedro Laurenz in 1937 and lyrics by José María Contursi.
  • Silueta Porteña, meaning ‘Shadow Of A Woman Of Buenos Aires’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 17 July 1936; a milonga with music composed by Nicolas Luis Cuccaro and Juan Ventura Cuccaro in 1936, lyrics by Orlando D’Aniello and Ernesto Noli, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • El Llorón, meaning ‘The One Who Weeps’; recorded by Hugo Díaz in 1972; a milonga with music composed by Juan Félix Maglio in 1933 and lyrics by Enrique Cadícomo.

Pedro Laurenz, composer

2019-10-10 - Pedro Laurenz, in Japan, 1964

Last edition took a brief look at the life of bandoneonista, orquesta leader, and composer Pedro Laurenz, and this edition explores his legacy of compositions through his own playing. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Pedro_Laurenz

PLAYLIST:

  • Mascarita; recorded by Pedro Laurenz on 21 February 1940; a vals with music composed by Pedro Laurenz, lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo, and sung by Juan Carlos Casas. The name is a reference to a person wearing a mask.
  • Risa Loca, meaning ‘Mad Laughter’; recorded by Julio De Caro on 16 December 1926; a tango with music composed by Pedro Laurenz and lyrics by José Pedro de Grandis.
  • Berretín, meaning ‘Obsession’; recorded by Julio De Caro on 28 February 1928; a tango with music composed by Pedro Laurenz in 1928.
  • Coqueta, meaning ‘Coquette’; recorded by Julio De Caro in 1930; a tango with music composed by Pedro Laurenz and lyrics by Manuel Meaños.
  • Sin Tacha, meaning ‘Without Fault’; recorded by Julio De Caro in 1931; a tango with music composed by Pedro Laurenz.
  • Vieja Amiga, meaning ‘Old Friend’; recorded by Pedro Laurenz on 12 May 1938; a tango with music composed by Pedro Laurenz in 1938, lyrics by José María Contursi, and sung by Juan Carlos Casas.
  • Como Dos Extraños, meaning ‘Like Two Strangers’; recorded by Pedro Laurenz on 28 June 1940; a tango with music composed by Pedro Laurenz in 1940, lyrics by José María Contursi, and sung by Juan Carlos Casas.
  • De Puro Guapo, meaning ‘Tough Guy’; recorded by Pedro Laurenz on 25 January 1940; a tango with music composed by Pedro Laurenz in 1935, lyrics by Manuel Meaños, and sung by Juan Carlos Casas.
  • Improvisando, meaning ‘Improvising’; recorded by Pedro Laurenz on 29 July 1940; a milonga with music composed by Pedro Laurenz and lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo.
  • Milonga De Mis Amores, meaning ‘Milonga Of My Loves’; recorded by Pedro Laurenz on 14 January 1944; a milonga with music composed by Pedro Laurenz in 1937 and lyrics by José María Contursi.
  • Es Mejor Perdonar, meaning ‘It’s Better To Forgive’; recorded by Pedro Laurenz on 31 March 1942; a tango with music composed by Pedro Laurenz, lyrics by José María Contursi, and sung by Alberto Del Campo.
  • Patria Mia, meaning ‘My Country’, or ‘My Fatherland’; recorded by Pedro Laurenz on 15 July 1943; a tango with music composed by Pedro Laurenz, lyrics by Héctor Marcó, and sung by Alberto Podestá.
  • Veinticuartro De Agosto, meaning ‘Twenty-fourth Of August’, and also known as ’24 de Agosto’; recorded by Pedro Laurenz on 16 April 1943; a tango with music composed by Pedro Laurenz, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Alberto Podestá. The twenty-fourth of August 1816 is the birth date of the only child of General José de San Martín, leader of the Army of the Andes in the struggles for independence by Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay. Much of what is now Argentina was effectively independent by 1816, but San Martín continued to participate in the break-up of the Spanish Empire until the early 1820s, after which he retired. His wife had died and so he took his daughter to Europe to devote himself to her upbringing. For this national hero’s dedication to his child her birthday has been unofficially adopted as Father’s Day in some parts of Argentina, particularly in the Mendoza region where she was born.
  • Mala Junta, meaning ‘Bad Company’; recorded by Pedro Laurenz on 16 January 1947; a tango with music composed by Pedro Laurenz and Julio De Caro in 1927 and lyrics by Juan Miguel Velich.
  • Orgullo Criollo, meaning ‘Argentine Pride’; recorded by Pedro Laurenz on 5 September 1941; a tango with music composed by Pedro Laurenz and Julio De Caro, first recorded in 1928.
  • Amurado, meaning ‘Harassed’; recorded by Pedro Laurenz on 25 September 1952; a tango with music composed by Pedro Laurenz and Pedro Maffia in 1926 and lyrics by José Pedro de Grandis.
  • Esquinero, meaning ‘Layabout’; recorded by Pedro Laurenz in 1960; a tango with music composed by Pedro Laurenz and lyrics by Horacio Arturo Ferrer.
  • Mal De Amores, meaning ‘Lovesickness’;, from the collection ‘Quinteto Real’ released in 1960, recorded by Quinteto Real in 1960; a tango with music composed by Pedro Laurenz, first recorded in 1928.

Entre Tango Duo & Julian Schaeffer

2019-10-06 - Entre Tango Duo & Julian Schaeffer at the Open Studio, Northcote, VIC on 27 July

Listen in as Julian Schaeffer meets Entre Tango Duo for an afternoon of Bossa nova, Chacarera, Zamba, and Tango. The dynamic professional life of bandoneonista and orquesta leader Pedro Laurenz is also featured, together with a quick round up of live music events across the region during October and November. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Elian Sellanes (piano), Julian Schaeffer (guitar), and Elena González (vocals) at Open Studio, Northcote, VIC on 27 April 2019.

PLAYLIST:

  • Marioneta, meaning ‘Puppet’; recorded by Ánibel Troilo on 6 October 1944; a tango with music composed by Juan José Guichandut in 1928, lyrics by Armando Tagini, and sung by Floreal Ruíz.
  • Mendocina, meaning ‘Girl From Mendoza’; recorded by Pedro Laurenz on 19 Devcember 1944; a vals with music composed by Miguel Bruno, first recorded in 1942, lyrics by Benigno Palmeiro, and sung by Carlos Bermúdez and Jorge Linares.
  • Julián; recorded by Pedro Laurenz and Pedro Maffia, in duet on 3 July 1925; a tango with music composed by Edgardo Donato in 1924 and lyrics by José Luis Panizza.
  • La Revancha, meaning ‘The Rematch’, or ‘The Revenge’; recorded by Julio De Caro in 1932; a tango with music composed by Pedro Laurenz, first recorded in 1926 and lyrics by Pedro Laurenz.
  • Amurado, meaning ‘Harassed’; recorded by Pedro Laurenz on 29 July 1940; a tango with music composed by Pedro Laurenz and Pedro Maffia in 1926, lyrics by José Pedro de Grandis, and sung by Juan Carlos Casas.
  • Taquito Militar, meaning ‘Military Heels’; recorded by Quinteto Real on 1960s; a milonga with music composed by Mariano Mores in 1952. The name is a reference to the heeled boots that were worn as dress uniform by the military services in Argentina at the time; the heel was based on a cavalry heel, and so made a clear tap on the ground as the wearer walked – or danced.
  • Déjame Que Me Vaya, meaning ‘Let Me Go’; recorded live from a performance by Entre Tango Duo and Julian Schaeffer at Open Studio, Northcote, Melbourne, VIC on 25 July 2019; a chacarera trunca with music composed by Saúl Belindo Carabajal and lyrics by Roberto Ternán. Written in or before 1995, when Chaqueño Palavecino released the song on the El Alma De Felipito album.
  • Malena; recorded live from a performance by Entre Tango Duo and Julian Schaeffer at Open Studio, Northcote, Melbourne, VIC on 25 July 2019; a tango with music composed by Lucio Demare in 1942 and lyrics by Homero Manzi. It was possibly the nightclub singer Malena de Toledo (stage name of Elena Tortolero) who captured Manzi’s imagination when he saw her performing in Brazil, and led him to write these lyrics. The story goes that Demare was so taken by the lyrics that he wrote the music for them in a quarter of an hour.
  • Tango Negro, meaning ‘Black Tango’; recorded live from a performance by Entre Tango Duo and Julian Schaeffer at Open Studio, Northcote, Melbourne on 25 July 2019; a milonga candombe with music and lyrics by Juan Carlos Cáceres, first recorded by him in 1999.
  • Romance De Barrio, meaning ‘Suburban Romance’;, from the collection ‘Comme Il Faut’ released in 2019, recorded by Pablo Estigarribia, Horacio Cabarcos, and Victor Lavallen in 2019; a vals with music composed by Ánibal Troilo in 1947 and lyrics by Homero Manzi.

 

The Tango Conversation

2019-09-12 - Tango Connection (courtesy - Iris Toren)

Tango is a social dance, and the quintessential social activity is a conversation. Tanguero Peter Newell introduces his  ‘5Cs’ that go together to make up the tango conversation.   That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: by courtesy of Iris Toren.

This interview can be played here:

PLAYLIST:

  • La Cumparsita, meaning ‘The Little March’; recorded by Bianco-Bachicha on 28 January 1928; a tango with music composed by Gerardo Matos Rodríguez in 1924, lyrics by Pascual Contursi, Enrique Maroni, and Gerado Matos Rodríguez.
  • Poema, meaning ‘Poem’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 11 June 1935; a tango with music composed by Mario Melfi in 1935, lyrics by Eduardo Bianco, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • El Pañuelito, meaning ‘The Little Handkerchief’; recorded by Juan D’Arienzo on 26 August 1963; a tango with music composed by Juan de Dos Filiberto, first recorded in 1920, lyrics by Gabino Coria Peñaloza, and sung by Héctor Millán and Jorge Valdez.
  • Coqueta, meaning ‘Coquette’; recorded by Orquesta Típica Victor on 19 June 1929; a tango with music composed by Osman Pérez Freire.
  • Canto De Amor, meaning ‘Love Song’; recorded by Osvaldo Fresedo on 18 June 1934; a tango with music composed by Osvaldo Fresedo, lyrics by Emilio Augusto Oscar Fresedo, and sung by Roberto Ray.
  • Felicia, from the collection ‘La Cumparsita’ recorded by Orquesta Juan D’Arienzo in 1984; a tango with music composed by Enrique Saborido, first recorded in 1927 and lyrics by Carlos Maurcio Pacheco. Orquesta Juan D’Arienzo was the name of this re-grouping of Juan D’Arienzo’s musicians after he retired; they also worked under the name Los Solistas De Juan D’Arienzo. The lyrics are a cry of loss from a Uruguayan expatriate who believes he will never see or smell the flowers and beaches of his homeland again, but there are no records of them ever being recorded.