Tango in the 21st century (II)

This edition explores further the many orquestas and smaller ensembles that have sprung up in Buenos Aires this century. Often made up of highly trained young musicians, sadly these ensembles do not generally have a long life span, but they bring the original tone of live tango back to the milongas while they flourish.  That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: CD covers for the music acknowledged in the playlist.

PLAYLIST:

  • Patotero Sentimental, meaning ‘Sentimental Hoodlum’, and also known as ‘Bailarín Porteño’; from the collection ‘Orilleras Y Canyengues vol 1’ released in 2005, recorded by Guardia Viejo in 2005; a tango with music composed by Manuel Jovés in 1922, lyrics by Manuel Romero, and sung by  Unidentified.  
  • Sentimento Gaucho, meaning ‘Sentimental Gaucho’; from the collection ‘Orilleras Y Canyengues vol 1’ released in 2005, recorded by Guardia Viejo in 2005; a tango with music composed by Francisco Canaro & Rafael Canaro in 1924, lyrics by Juan Andrés Caruso, and sung by  Unidentified.  
  • Organito De La Tarde, meaning ‘Hurdy-Gurdy Of The Evening’; from the collection ‘Orilleras Y Canyengues vol 1’ released in 2005, recorded by Guardia Viejo in 2005; a tango with music composed by Cátulo Castillo in 1923 and lyrics by José González Castillo (Juan de Léon).  
  • Mamá, Yo Quiero Un Novio, meaning ‘Mama, I Want A Boyfriend’; from the collection ‘De Ida’ released in 2004, recorded by Las Del Abasto in 2004; a tango with music composed by Ramón Callazo in 1928, lyrics by Roberto Fontaina, and sung by Stella Díaz.  
  • Corralera; from the collection ‘Minas De Tango’ released in 2011, recorded live from a performance by Las Del Abasto at Teatro Presidente Alvear, Buenos Aires on March 2010; a milonga with music composed by Anselmo A Aieta, first recorded in 1956. The name is a reference to a person living in the suburd Los Corrales, so-named because it was close to the abbatoirs that processed Argentina’s huge export trade in beef.  
  • Se Dice De Mí, meaning ‘They Say About Me’; from the collection ‘Minas De Tango’ released in 2011, recorded live from a performance by Las Del Abasto at Teatro Presidente Alvear, Buenos Aires on March 2010; a tango with music composed by Francisco Canaro   in 1943, lyrics by Ivo Pelay, and sung by Stella Díaz.  
  • Invierno, meaning ‘Winter’; from the collection ‘Una Noche En La Milonga’ released in 2013, recorded by Orquesta Típica Misteriosa Buenos Aires in 2013; a tango with music composed by Horacio Pettorossi, first recorded in 1937, lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo, and sung by Carlos Rossi.   
  • Mi Dolor, meaning ‘My Sadness’; from the collection ‘Una Noche En La Milonga’ released in 2013, recorded by Orquesta Típica Misteriosa Buenos Aires in 2013; a tango with music composed by Carlos Marcucci, first recorded in 1926, lyrics by Manuel Meaños, and sung by Ariel Prat.  
  • Gallo Ciego, from lunfardo, meaning ‘Blind Rooster’; from the collection ‘Una Noche En La Milonga’ released in 2013, recorded by Orquesta Típica Misteriosa Buenos Aires in 2013; a tango with music composed by Agustín Bardi, first recorded in 1927.  
  • El Huracán, meaning ‘The Hurricane’; from the collection ‘Catulo Presenta’ released in 2010, recorded by Ojos De Tango in 2010; a tango with music composed by Osvaldo Donato & Edgardo Donato, first recorded in 1932, lyrics by Nolo López, and sung by Ricardo (Chiqui) Pereyra.  
  • Este Es El Rey, meaning ‘This Is The King’; from the collection ‘Catulo Presenta’ released in 2010, recorded by Ojos De Tango in 2010; a tango with music composed by Carlos Ángel Lázzari & Manuel Antonio Caballero & Juan Polito, first recorded in 1971.  
  • Tinta Roja, meaning ‘Red Stain’; from the collection ‘Catulo Presenta’ released in 2010, recorded by Ojos De Tango in 2010; a tango with music composed by Sebastián Piana in 1941 and lyrics by Cátulo Castillo.  
  • La Tablada, meaning ‘The Hurricane’; from the collection ‘En Vivo A Café Vinilo’ released in 2012, recorded live from a performance by Orquesta Victoria at Café Vinilo, Buenos Aires on 17 December 2012; a tango with music composed by Francisco Canaro  , first recorded in 1927, and sung by Agustín Fuertes.  
  • Nostalgias, meaning ‘Nostalgia’; from the collection ‘En Vivo A Café Vinilo’ released in 2012, recorded live from a performance by Orquesta Victoria at Café Vinilo, Buenos Aires on 17 December 2012; a tango with music composed by Juan Carlos Cobián in 1936 and lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo.  
  • Gricel; from the collection ‘En Vivo A Café Vinilo’ released in 2012, recorded live from a performance by Orquesta Victoria at Café Vinilo, Buenos Aires on 17 December 2012; a tango with music composed by Mariano Mores in 1942 and lyrics by José María Contursi.  
  • Quejas De Bandoneón, meaning ‘Bandoneón Complaints’; from the collection ‘Tango Fire’ released in 2005, recorded by Quartado Tango in 2005; a tango with music composed by Juan De Dios Filiberto, first recorded in 1920.  
  • Canaro En Paris, meaning ‘Canaro In Paris’; from the collection ‘Tango Fire’ released in 2005, recorded by Quartado Tango in 2005; a tango with music composed by Alejandro Scarpino & Juan Caldarella, first recorded in 1927 and lyrics by José Antonio Scarpino.  
  • La Trampera, meaning ‘The Cheat’; from the collection ‘Tango Fire’ released in 2005, recorded by Quartado Tango in 2005; a milonga with music composed by Ánibal Troilo, first recorded in 1950.  

Lucio Demare

Last edition looked at the life of orquesta leader and pianist Lucio Demare, and this edition explores his compositions as presented by him. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Lucio Demare

PLAYLIST:

  • No Nos Veremos Más, meaning ‘We Will See Each Other No More’; recorded by Lucio Demare on 11 February 1943; a vals with music composed by Lucio Demare, first recorded in 1935, lyrics by Julio Plácido Navarrine, and sung by Raúl Berón.  
  • Telón, meaning ‘Curtain’; recorded by Lucio Demare on 13 June 1938; a tango with music composed by Lucio Demare, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Juan Carlos Miranda.  
  • Pa’ Mí Es Igual, meaning ‘For Me It Is The Same’, and also known as ‘Siempre Amigos’; recorded by Lucio Demare on 9 September 1942; a tango with music composed by Enrique Cadícamo & Lucio Demare & Roberto Fugazot in 1932, lyrics by Enrique  Cadícamo & Lucio Demare & Roberto Fugazot, and sung by Juan Carlos Miranda.  
  • Negro María, meaning ‘Black Mary’; recorded by Lucio Demare on 21 November 1941; a milonga with music composed by Lucio Demare in 1941, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Juan Carlos Miranda.  
  • Milonga En Rojo, meaning ‘Milonga In Red’; recorded by Lucio Demare on 3 September 1942; a milonga with music composed by Lucio Demare & Roberto Fugazot, lyrics by José Gonzálex Castillo (Juan de León), and sung by Juan Carlos Miranda.  
  • Irigoyen Solo, meaning ‘Only Irigoyen’, and also known as ‘Yrigoyen Solo’; recorded by Trio Argentino in 1928; a tango with music composed by Lucio Demare and lyrics by Agustín Irusta & Roberto Fugazot.  
  • Musette, meaning ‘Muse’, and also known as ‘Mussete, or Musset’; recorded by Trio Argentino in 1929; a tango with music composed by Lucio Demare.  
  • Dandy, meaning ‘Dandy’; recorded by Trio Argentino in 1930; a tango with music composed by Lucio Demare in 1928 and lyrics by Agustín Irusta & Roberto Fugazot.  
  • Mañana Zarpa Un Barco, meaning ‘Tomorrow The Ship Sails’; recorded by Lucio Demare on 20 July 1942; a tango with music composed by Lucio Demare in 1942, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Juan Carlos Miranda.  
  • Sorbos Amargos, meaning ‘Bitter Sip’; recorded by Lucio Demare on 10 November 1942; a tango with music composed by Lucio Demare, first recorded in 1928?, lyrics by Agustín Irusta & Roberto Fugazot, and sung by Juan Carlos Miranda.  
  • Humildad, meaning ‘Humility’; recorded  on 27 January 1953; a tango with music composed by Lucio Demare and lyrics by Alfredo Navarrine, featuring Lucio Demare on piano.  
  • Rosa Peregrina, meaning ‘Pink Pilgrim’;; a vals with music composed by Lucio Demare & Agustín Irusta & Roberto Fugazot, first recorded in 1934 and lyrics by Antonio Graciani & Dolores Ramos De La Vega, featuring Lucio Demare on piano.  
  • La Esquina, meaning ‘The Corner’; recorded by Lucio Demare on 12 July 1938; a milonga with music composed by Lucio Demare.  
  • Luna, meaning ‘Moon’; recorded by Lucio Demare on 21 December 1943; a milonga with music composed by Lucio Demare, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Raúl Berón.  
  • Más Allá De Mi Rencor, meaning ‘Beyond My Grudge’; recorded by Lucio Demare on 11 June 1945; a tango with music composed by Lucio Demare, lyrics by Julián Centeya, and sung by Carlos Bernal.  
  • Sentimiento Tanguero, meaning ‘Sentimental Tango Dancer’; recorded by Lucio Demare in 1956; a tango with music composed by Lucio Demare.  
  • Dónde, meaning ‘Where?’; recorded by Lucio Demare in 1954; a tango with music composed by Lucio Demare & Agustín Irusta & Roberto Fugazot, first recorded in 1935, lyrics by Antonio Graciani, and sung by Armando Garrido.  

Alturas (2009-2017)

There’s a retrospective look at the Australian jazz-tango group Alturas, and the life and times of Lucio Demare forms a microcosm of the trajectory of tango over the 20th century.  That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Ann Smith; Alturas playing one of their last performances, at Django’s in Sydney, on 17 September 2017.

PLAYLIST:

  • Soledad La De Barracas, meaning ‘Loneliness Of The Barracks’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 6 September 1945; a tango with music composed by Roberto Garza in 1945, lyrics by Carlos Bahr, and sung by Jorge Ortiz. The name is a reference to the suburb Barracas in Buenos Aires.  
  • Tal Vez Será Su Voz, meaning ‘Maybe It was Your Voice’, and also known as Tal Vez Será Mi Alcohol; recorded by Lucio Demare on 25 June 1943; a tango with music composed by Lucio Demare in 1943, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Raúl Berón.  
  • Mañanita De Montmartre, meaning ‘Early Morning In Montmartre’; recorded by Trio Argentino in 1928; a tango with music composed by Lucio Demare, lyrics by Agustín Irusta & Roberto Fugazot, and sung by Agustín Irusta and Roberto Fugazot. The name is a reference to the suburb in Paris, close to where the tango nightclubs were.  
  • Solamente…Ella, meaning ‘Only…Her’; recorded by Lucio Demare on 24 July 1944; a tango with music composed by Lucio Demare, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Horacio Quintana.  
  • La Calle Sin Sueño, meaning ‘The Street Without Hope’; recorded by Lucio Demare on 30 July 1968; a tango with music composed by Lucio Demare, first recorded in 1957 and lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo.  
  • Malena; recorded by Lucio Demare on 23 January 1942; a tango with music composed by Lucio Demare in 1942, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Juan Carlos  Miranda. The name is a reference to a nightclub singer of that name.  
  • Taquito Militar, meaning ‘Military Heels’; from the collection ‘Sin Palabras’ released in 2015, recorded by Alturas in 2015; a milonga with music composed by Mariano Mores in 1952, arranged by Jane Andino.  
  • Gran Hotel Victoria, meaning ‘Grand Hotel Victoria’, and also known as ‘Hotel Victoria’; from the collection ‘Café Con Tango’ released in 2013, recorded by Alturas in 2013; a tango with music composed by Feliciano Latasa in 1906 and lyrics by Carlos Pesce, arranged by Norberto Vogel.  
  • Pedacito De Cielo, meaning ‘Little Sliver Of Sky’; from the collection ‘Café Con Tango’ released in 2013, recorded by Alturas in 2013; a vals with music composed by Enrique Francini & Héctor Stamponi in 1942 and lyrics by Homero Expósito, arranged by Alturas.  
  • Ayer Mi Hija, meaning ‘Yesterday My Daughter’; from the collection ‘Sin Palabras’ released in 2015, recorded by Alturas in 2015; a nuevo composed by Rodolfo Mederos, arranged by Greg Gibson.  
  • Chiquilín De Bachín, from lunfardo; from the collection ‘Café Con Tango’ released in 2013, recorded by Alturas in 2013; a nuevo with music composed by Astor Piazzolla in 1968, lyrics by Horacio Arturo Ferrer, arranged by Alturas, and sung by Ann Palumbo.  
  • Alfonsina Y El Mar, meaning ‘Alfonsina And The Sea’;, from the collection ‘Sin Palabras’ released in 2015, recorded by Alturas in 2015; a tango with music composed by Ariel Ramírez and lyrics by Félix César Luna, arranged by Jane Andino and Greg Gibson.  

Tango Guitars I

2020-08-26 - Tango Guitars - at the markets in Bs As

The guitar of the gauchos was the seminal instrument of tango, but separated over a century ago as the genre fissioned into two distinct streams – tango cancion – exemplified by Carlos Gardel with guitar backing – and the tango bailable tradition of the orquesta típica. Over recent decades this divide has been explored by guitarists playing the music of the bailable tradition, and this edition is the first of a series that features this exploration.  That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Ann Smith; Guitars at the Markets in Bs As.

PLAYLIST:

  • Barrio De Tango, meaning ‘Suburb Of Tango’; from the collection ‘Si Vuelvo A Buenos Aires’ released in 2012, recorded by Quinteto De Los Santos in 2012; a tango with music composed by Ánibal Troilo in 1942, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Walter (Chino) Larroquet.
  • Viejo Smoking, meaning ‘Old Man Smoking’; from the collection ‘Si Vuelvo A Buenos Aires’ released in 2012, recorded by Quinteto De Los Santos in 2012; a tango with music composed by Guillermo Barbieri in 1930, lyrics by Celedonio Flores, and sung by Roberto Piraccini.
  • El Motivo, meaning ‘The Motive’, and also known as ‘Pobre Paica’; from the collection ‘Si Vuelvo A Buenos Aires’ released in 2012, recorded by Quinteto De Los Santos in 2012; a tango with music composed by Juan Carlos Cobián in 1920, lyrics by Pascual Contursi, and sung by Néstor Fabián.
  • Taquito Militar, meaning ‘Little Military Heel’; from the collection ‘Hermanos Veloso vol. 3’ released in 2012, recorded by Hermanos Veloso in 2012; a milonga with music composed by Mariano Mores in 1952 and lyrics by Dante Gilardoni. The CD is undated but was purchased early in 2012, and was reasonably recent then.
  • Canaro En Paris, meaning ‘Canaro In Paris’; from the collection ‘Hermanos Veloso vol. 3’ released in 2012, recorded by Hermanos Veloso in 2012; a tango with music composed by Alejandro Scarpino & Juan Caldarella, first recorded in 1927 and lyrics by José Antonio Scarpino. The CD is undated but was purchased early in 2012, and was reasonably recent then.
  • Nueve De Julio, meaning ‘9th Of July’, and also known as ‘9 De Julio’; from the collection ‘Hermanos Veloso vol. 3’ released in 2012, recorded by Hermanos Veloso in 2012; a tango with music composed by José Luis Padula, first recorded in 1916 and lyrics by Lito Bayardo. The name is a reference to an important date in Argentina’s independence from the Spanish Empire. The CD is undated but was purchased early in 2012, and was reasonably recent then.
  • Comme Il Faut, meaning ‘As It Should Be’, and also known as ‘Como Debe Ser’; from the collection ‘Tango Tango vol. 3’ released in 2010, recorded by LaBorde & Kvitko in 2010; a tango with music composed by Eduardo Arolas, first recorded in 1936, lyrics by Gabriel Clausi, and sung by Walter (Chino) Laborde. A joint production from Walter (Chino) Laborde (voice) and Diego Kvitko (guitar).
  • Derecho Viejo, meaning ‘Old Rule’; from the collection ‘Tango Tango vol. 3’ released in 2010, recorded by LaBorde & Kvitko in 2010; a tango with music composed by Eduardo Arolas, first recorded in 1917, and sung by Walter (Chino) Laborde. A joint production from Walter (Chino) Laborde (voice) and Diego Kvitko (guitar).
  • Mi Dolor, meaning ‘My Grief’; from the collection ‘Tango Tango vol. 3’ released in 2010, recorded by LaBorde & Kvitko in 2010; a tango with music composed by Carlos Marcucci, first recorded in 1926, lyrics by Manuel Meaños, and sung by Walter (Chino) Laborde. A joint production from Walter (Chino) Laborde (voice) and Diego Kvitko (guitar).
  • Berretín; from the collection ‘Complicidad’ released in 2007, recorded by Mainetti & Angeleri in 2007; a tango with music composed by Pedro Laurenz in 1928. A joint production from Pablo Marinetti (bandoneón)  and Cesár Angeleri (guitar).
  • Mariposita, meaning ‘Little Butterfly’; from the collection ‘Complicidad’ released in 2007, recorded by Mainetti & Angeleri in 2007; a tango with music composed by Anselmo A Aieta in 1941 and lyrics by Francisco García Jiménez. A joint production from Pablo Marinetti (bandoneón)  and Cesár Angeleri (guitar).
  • Silbando, meaning ‘Whistling’; from the collection ‘Complicidad’ released in 2007, recorded by Mainetti & Angeleri in 2007; a tango with music composed by Cátulo Castillo & Sebastián Piana in 1923 and lyrics by José González Castillo (Juan de León). A joint production from Pablo Marinetti (bandoneón)  and Cesár Angeleri (guitar).
  • Melancólico, meaning ‘Melancholy’; from the collection ‘Tango Argentino’ released in 2003, recorded by Victor Villadangos in 2003; a tango with music composed by Julián Plaza, first recorded in 1961.
  • Nostálgico, meaning ‘Nostalgic’; from the collection ‘Tango Argentino’ released in 2003, recorded by Victor Villadangos in 2003; a tango with music composed by Julián Plaza, first recorded in 1962.
  • Sur, meaning ‘South’; from the collection ‘Tango Argentino’ released in 2003, recorded by Victor Villadangos in 2003; a tango with music composed by Ánibal Troilo.
  • Oro Y Plata, meaning ‘Gold And Silver’; from the collection ‘Altertango II’ released in 2004, recorded by Altertango in 2004; a tango with music composed by Charlo in 1943, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Victoria Di Raimondo.

 

Pablo Valle, pianist & director

2020-08-13 - Pablo Valle

Pablo Valle has been channelling the essence of the Golden Age through his piano and his Sexteto for a decade and a half. Listen in to hear how the life of tango musicians repeats a century later. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit: http://www.pablovalletango.com/; used by permission

Correction: I mentioned that, “like Pugliese, Pable Valle debuted at the Marabú nightclub”; the major pianist that debuted his orquesta at the Marabú was of course Biagi.

PLAYLIST:

  • La Puñalada, meaning ‘The Stabbing’; from the collection ‘Cortando Clavos’ released in 2014, recorded by La Juan D’Arienzo in 2014; a milonga with music composed by Pintín Castellanos in 1933 and lyrics by Celadonio Flores.
  • Paciencia, meaning ‘Patience’; from the collection ‘Cortando Clavos’ released in 2014, recorded by La Juan D’Arienzo in 2014; a tango with music composed by Juan D’Arienzo in 1937 and lyrics by Francisco Gorrindo.
  • Olga; from the collection ‘Siciliano’ released in 2016, recorded by La Juan D’Arienzo in 2016; a vals with music composed by Francisco Peña, first recorded in 1927 and lyrics by Francisco Peña. The name is a reference to a woman’s name.
  • Quiero Verte Una Vez Más, meaning ‘I Want To See You One More Time’, and also known as ‘Viejo Gaucho’; from the collection ‘D’Arienzo En El Corazón’ released in 2018, recorded by Los Heredos Del Compás in 2018; a tango with music composed by Mario Canaro in 1938 and lyrics by José María Contursi.
  • De Igual A Igual, meaning ‘Between Equals’; from the collection ‘D’Arienzo En El Corazón’ released in 2018, recorded by Los Heredos Del Compás in 2018; a tango with music composed by Rodolfo Sciammarella, first recorded in 1944 and lyrics by Rodolfo Sciammarella.
  • La Espuela, meaning ‘The Spur’; from the collection ‘D’Arienzo En El Corazón’ released in 2018, recorded by Los Heredos Del Compás in 2018; a milonga, first recorded in 1946.
  • Bélgica, meaning ‘Belgium’; from the collection ‘Pa’ Milonguear’ released in 2014, recorded by Pablo Valle Sexteto in 2014; a tango with music composed by Enrique Delfino, first recorded in 1942.
  • Indiferencia, meaning ‘Indifference’; from the collection ‘Pa’ Milonguear’ released in 2014, recorded by Pablo Valle Sexteto in 2014; a tango with music composed by Rodolfo Biagi in 1937 and lyrics by Juan Carlos Thorry.
  • Lágrimas Y Sonrisas, meaning ‘Tears And Smiles’; from the collection ‘Pa’ Milonguear’ released in 2014, recorded by Pablo Valle Sexteto in 2014; a vals with music composed by Pascual De Gullo, first recorded in 1914 and lyrics by Francisco Gullo.
  • La Yumba; from the collection ‘Pa’ Milonguear’ released in 2014, recorded by Pablo Valle Sexteto in 2014; a tango with music composed by Osvaldo Pugliese, first recorded in 1946. The name is a reference to the deep rhythmic sound typical of tango music.
  • Emancipación, meaning ‘Emancipation’; from the collection ‘Pa’ Milonguear’ released in 2014, recorded by Pablo Valle Sexteto in 2014; a tango with music composed by Alfredo Bevillacqua, first recorded in 1912 and lyrics by Andtonio Polito.
  • Para Siempre, meaning ‘Forever’; from the collection ‘Para Siempre’ released in 2017, recorded by Pablo Valle Sexteto in 2017; a tango with music composed by Pablo Valle.
  • Verdemar, meaning ‘Sea-Green’; from the collection ‘Para Siempre’ released in 2017, recorded by Pablo Valle Sexteto in 2017; a tango with music composed by Carlos Di Sarli in 1943 and lyrics by José María Contursi.
  • Tus Labios Me Dirán, meaning ‘Your Lips Will Tell Me’; from the collection ‘Para Siempre’ released in 2017, recorded by Pablo Valle Sexteto in 2017; a tango with music composed by Emilio Brameri, first recorded in 1945 and lyrics by Héctor Marcó.
  • Te Aconsejo Que Me Olvides, meaning ‘I Suggest Yu Forget Me’; from the collection ‘Para Siempre’ released in 2017, recorded by Pablo Valle Sexteto in 2017; a tango with music composed by Pedro Maffia in 1928 and lyrics by Jorge Curi.
  • Guapeando, meaning ‘Handsome’; from the collection ‘Para Siempre’ released in 2017, recorded by Pablo Valle Sexteto in 2017; a tango with music composed by Juan Larenza, first recorded in 1941.
  • Alzó Una Rosa, meaning ‘I Picked Up A Rose’; from the collection ‘Dame La Mano’ released in 2020, recorded by Francisco Pesqueira & Ramiro Pettina in 2020 with guest artist Sandra Luna (voice) & Pablo Valle (piano); a ballad with music composed by Ramiro Pettina and lyrics by Francisco Pesqueira.

Colectivo29 (2010-2012)

2020-08-01 - Colectivo29

Melbourne quintet Coletivo29 featured the driving piano and typey arrangements of Andrew James and this edition features a retrospective of their music as well as an analysis of one of the key influences on the demise of tango dancing, Francisco Rotundo. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Colectivo29; reproduced by permission.

PLAYLIST:

  • Córdobesita, meaning ‘Girl From Córdoba’; recorded by Osvaldo Fresedo on 2 August 1933; a tango with music composed by Pascual Storti, lyrics by Emilio Augusto Oscar Fresedo, and sung by Roberto Ray.
  • El Caburé, from lunfardo, meaning ‘The Ladies’ Man’; recorded by Francisco Rotundo on 1 August 1956; a tango with music composed by Arturo De Bassi, first recorded in 1913.
  • Llorando La Carta, meaning ‘Weeping The Letter’; recorded by Francisco Rotundo on 10 September 1951; a tango with music composed by Juan Fulginiti, first recorded in 1930, lyrics by Juan Fulginiti, and sung by Enrique Campos. The name is a reference to a jilted lover writing through his tears to tell her of his suffering and his forgiveness.
  • Un Infierno, meaning ‘Hell’; recorded by Francisco Rotundo on 14 December 1953; a tango with music composed by Francisco Rotundo in 1953, lyrics by Reinaldo Yiso, and sung by Floreal Ruíz.
  • Carnaval, meaning ‘Carnival’; recorded by Francisco Rotundo on 26 June 1953; a candombe with music composed by Francisco Rotundo & Tití Rossi, lyrics by Pedro Blasco, and sung by Julio Sosa. The name is a reference to the three days of festivities held immediately before Lent in much of South America.
  • Al Fin De Cuentas, meaning ‘At The End Of Accounts’; recorded by Francisco Rotundo on 22 January 1957; a tango with music composed by Enrique Campos, lyrics by Juan Fulginiti, and sung by Enrique Campos. The name is a reference to the confession of a man who murdered the man that seduced his lover.
  • El Aristócrata, meaning ‘The Aristocratic Woman’, and also known as ‘Shusheta’; from the collection ‘Colectivo29’ released in 2011, recorded live from a performance by Colectivo29 at Paris Cat Jazz Club, Melbourne on 19 May 2011; a tango with music composed by Juan Carlos Cobián and lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo.
  • Garúa, meaning ‘Drizzle’; from the collection ‘Colectivo29’ released in 2011, recorded live from a performance by Colectivo30 at Paris Cat Jazz Club, Melbourne on 19 May 2011; a tango with music composed by Ánibal Troilo, first recorded in 1943 and lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo.
  • Gallo Ciego, from lunfardo, meaning ‘Blind Rooster’; from the collection ‘Colectivo29’ released in 2011, recorded live from a performance by Colectivo31 at Paris Cat Jazz Club, Melbourne on 19 May 2011; a tango with music composed by Agustín Bardi, first recorded in 1927. It’s a metaphor for deception.
  • Milonga Del Ángel, meaning ‘Dance Of The Angel’; from the collection ‘Colectivo29’ released in 2011, recorded live from a performance by Colectivo32 at Paris Cat Jazz Club, Melbourne on 19 May 2011; a nuevo with music composed by Astor Piazzolla, first recorded in 1965.
  • Payadora; from the collection ‘Colectivo29’ released in 2011, recorded live from a performance by Colectivo33 at Paris Cat Jazz Club, Melbourne on 19 May 2011; a milonga with music composed by Julián Plaza, first recorded in 1966. The name is a reference to the payadors, the itinerant rap artists from the pampa whose milonga guitar rhythms and improvised verses were the initial seed of tango.
  • Don Agustín Bardi, and also known as ‘A Don Agustín Bardi’; from the collection ‘Colectivo29’ released in 2011, recorded live from a performance by Colectivo34 at Paris Cat Jazz Club, Melbourne on 19 May 2011; a tango with music composed by Horaccio Salgán, first recorded in 1950. The name is a reference to the early tango pianist and composer, Agustín Bardi.
  • Pa’ La Guardia, meaning ‘To The Guard’; from the collection ‘Colectivo29’ released in 2011, recorded live from a performance by Colectivo35 at Paris Cat Jazz Club, Melbourne on 19 May 2011; a tango with music composed by Ernesto Baffa & Antonio Lorenzo Scelza, first recorded in 1959.

Fabio Hager, bandoneonista

2020-07-15 - Fabio Hager - image by permission

This week Tango Capital casts the spotlight on contemporary bandoneonista and composer Fabio Hager. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit: reproduced by permission from https://fabiohager.wixsite.com/tango

Playlist & Live music and virtual tango calendar: Tango.Capital

PLAYLIST:

  • Felicia; from the collection ‘Vuelvo Al Sur’ released in 2006, recorded by Fabio Hager in 2006; a tango with music composed by Enrique Saborido, first recorded in 1927 and lyrics by Carlos Mauricio Pacheco. The name is a reference to a woman’s name.
  • Organito De La Tarde, meaning ‘Hurdy-gurdy Of The Afternoon’; from the collection ‘Recuerdo’ released in 2007, recorded by Fabio Hager in 2007; a tango with music composed by Cátulo Castillo in 1923 and lyrics by José González Castillo (Juan De León).
  • Recuerdo, meaning ‘Memory’; from the collection ‘Recuerdo’ released in 2007, recorded by Fabio Hager in 2007; a tango with music composed by Osvaldo Pugliese in 1924 and lyrics by Eduardo Moreno.
  • Nueve De Julio, meaning ‘Ninth of July’, and also known as ‘9 De Julio’; from the collection ‘Recuerdo’ released in 2007, recorded by Fabio Hager in 2007; a tango with music composed by José Luis Padula, first recorded in 1916 and lyrics by Lito Bayardo. The name is a reference to an important date in the struggle for independence.
  • Canaro En Paris, meaning ‘Canaro In Paris’; from the collection ‘Encanto Rojo’ released in 2008, recorded by Fabio Hager in 2008; a tango with music composed by Alejandro Scarpino & Juan Caldarella, first recorded in 1927 and lyrics by José Antonio Scarpino.
  • Cambalache, meaning ‘Mix-up’; from the collection ‘Zona De Riesgo’ released in 2010, recorded by Fabio Hager in 2010; a tango with music composed by Enrique Santos Discépolo in 1934 and lyrics by Enrique Santos Discépolo.
  • Los Cien Barrios Porteños, meaning ‘The Hundred Neighbourhoods ‘, and also known as ‘Cien Barrios Porteños’; from the collection ‘Valses’ released in 2010, recorded by Fabio Hager in 2010; a vals with music composed by Rodolfo Sciammarella in 1945 and lyrics by Carlos Artagnan Petit.
  • Ilusion Azul, meaning ‘Blue Illusion’; from the collection ‘Valses’ released in 2010, recorded by Fabio Hager in 2010; a vals with music composed by Arquímedes Arci, first recorded in 1933 and lyrics by Arquímedes Arci.
  • Pabellón De Las Rosas, meaning ‘Pavilion Of The Roses’; from the collection ‘Valses’ released in 2010, recorded by Fabio Hager in 2010; a vals with music composed by José Felipetti, first recorded in 1910 and lyrics by Antonio Catania & María Catania. Pabellón De Las Rosas was an popular café and dance spot in the formative years of tango.
  • El Entrerriano, meaning ‘The Chap From Entre Ríos’; from the collection ‘Retorno’ released in 2012, recorded by Fabio Hager in 2012; a tango with music composed by Rosendo Mendisábal in 1897 and lyrics by Ernesto Temes. This is one of the earliest tangos that can be positively dated. It was written for dedication to a wealthy landowner.
  • Pavadita, meaning ‘Trifle’; from the collection ‘Retorno’ released in 2012, recorded by Fabio Hager in 2012; a tango with music composed by Anselmo A Aieta, first recorded in 1958. Recorded between September 2011 and April 2012.
  • El Rey Del Compás, meaning ‘The King Of The Beat’; from the collection ‘Todo O Nada’ released in 2019, recorded by Fabio Hager in 2019; a tango with music and lyrics by Principe Cubana, first recorded in 1939. This was the title bestowed on Juan D’Arienzo after he re-invigorated tango in 1935.
  • Vuelvo Al Sur, meaning ‘Return To The South’; from the collection ‘Vuelvo Al Sur’ released in 2006, recorded by Fabio Hager in 2006; a tango nuevo with music composed by Astor Piazzolla, first recorded in 1987 and lyrics by Fernando Solanas.
  • Zona De Riesgo, meaning ‘Zone Of Risk’; from the collection ‘Zona De Riesgo’ released in 2010, recorded by Fabio Hager in 2010, a tango nuevo composed by Fabio Hager and recorded by him in 2008.
  • Retorno, meaning ‘Return ‘; from the collection ‘Retorno’ released in 2012, recorded by Fabio Hager in 2012; a tango nuevo composed by Fabio Hager and recorded by him in 2008.
  • Todo O Nada, meaning ‘All Or Nothing’; from the collection ‘Todo O Nada’ released in 2019, recorded by Fabio Hager in 2019, a tango Nuevo composed by Fabio Hager and recorded by him in 2008.
  • A New Way; from the collection ‘A New Way’ released in 2020, recorded by The Soundtrack Virtual Orchestra in 2020; music composed by Fabio Hager.
  • Encanto Rojo, meaning ‘Red Enchantment’; from the collection ‘Encanto Rojo’ released in 2008, composed by Fabio Hager and recorded by him in 2008.