Canyengue

2016-11-27-canyengue-at-bash-2016And picking up on the Canyengue theme established last week, this week’s edition is devoted to a range of canyengue music from Canaro, Lomuto, Firpo, and Orquesta Típica Victor, as well as modern productions from La Tubatango and Cuarteto Guardia Vieja. That’s Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm

Image:  Myk Dowling leads a demonstration dance for the canyengue workshop at Buenos Aires In The Southern Highlands (BASH 2016) last weekend.

 

 

PLAYLIST:

  • No Hay Que Hacerse Mala Sangre, meaning ‘There’s No Need For Bad Blood’, a canyengue recorded by Francisco Canaro, on 20 March 1935, with music composed by Francisco Canaro, with lyrics by Ivo Pelay, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Alma de Bandoneón, meaning ‘Soul Of The Bandoneón’, a canyengue recorded by Francisco Canaro, on 20 March 1935, with music composed by Enrique Santos Discépolo in 1935, with lyrics by Enrique Santos Discépolo & Luis César Amadori, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Noches de Buenos Aires, meaning ‘Nights Of Buenos Aires’, a canyengue recorded by Francisco Canaro, on 23 April 1935, with music composed by Alberto Soifer in 1935, with lyrics by Manuel Romero, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Oi, Malevo, meaning ‘Hey, Ruffian’, a canyengue recorded by Roberto Firpo, on 12 December 1929, with music composed by Juan José Buscaglia.
  • Falsa Alegria, meaning ‘False Joy’, a canyengue recorded by Roberto Firpo, on 8 May 1929.
  • Organito Del Suburbio, meaning ‘Suburban Organ-player’, a canyengue recorded by Roberto Firpo, on 26 June 1929, with music composed by Antonio Bonavena, with lyrics by Roberto Fermin Torres, and sung by Teófilo Ibáñez.
  • El Pardo Cejas, meaning ‘Brown Eyebrows’, a canyengue recorded by La Tubatango in 2006, with music composed by Prudencio Aragón and lyrics by Antonio Polito.
  • El Flete, meaning ‘The Racehorse’, a canyengue recorded by La Tubatango in 2006, with music composed by Vicente Greco in 1916, with lyrics by Gerónimo Gradito.
  • La Morocha, meaning ‘The Brunette’, a canyengue recorded by La Tubatango in 2006, with music composed by Enrique Saborido in 1905, with lyrics by Ángel Villoldo.
  • Filo Misho, a canyengue recorded by Orquesta Típica Victor, on 8 May 1930.
  • Recuerdo, meaning ‘A Memory’, a canyengue recorded by Orquesta Típica Victor, on 23 April 1930, with music composed by Osvaldo Pugliese in 1924, with lyrics by Eduardo Moreno, and sung by Roberto Diaz.
  • El Chamuyo, meaning ‘The Chattering’, a canyengue recorded by Orquesta Típica Victor in 1930.
  • 9 de Julio, meaning ‘9th of July’ (a national day of independence), a canyengue recorded by Cuarteto Guardia Vieja in 2005, with music composed by José Luis Padula, with lyrics by Lito Bayardo.
  • Re Fa Si, a canyengue recorded by Cuarteto Guardia Vieja in 2005, with music composed by Enrique Delfino.
  • Jueves, meaning ‘Thursday’, a canyengue recorded by Cuarteto Guardia Vieja in 2005, with music composed by Rafael Rossi & Udelino Toranzo.
  • Intimas, meaning ‘Intimate’, a canyengue recorded by Francisco Lomuto, on 11 August 1944, with music composed by Alfonso Lacueva, with lyrics by Ricardo Luis Brignolo, and sung by Carlos Galarce.
  • Desagravio, meaning ‘Grief’, a canyengue recorded by Francisco Lomuto, on 13 December 1944, with music composed by Francisco Lomuto, with lyrics by Homero Manzi & José María Contursi, and sung by Alberto Rivera.
  • Mano a Mano, meaning ‘Hand By Hand’, a canyengue recorded by Francisco Lomuto, on 11 August 1944, with music composed by Carlos Gardel & José Razzano in 1923, with lyrics by Celedonio Flores, and sung by Alberto Rivera.

Nestor Vaz, bandoneonista

ann-smith-with-pablo-translator-and-nestor-vaz-bandoneonistaIt’s BASH weekend, and picking up on the Canyengue workshop being presented there, the theme for the next two weeks is … Canyengue. This week, a look at the dance and its evolution, followed by the second part of the interview with Nestor Vaz. That’s Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm this Sunday

Image: Ann Smith with Pablo (translating) and Nestor Vaz, immediately after Nestor’s first recital in Australia, with Emily-Rose Sarkova at the Great Hall of Australian National University.

PLAYLIST:

  • Cambalache, meaning ‘Exchange, Mix-up, Mess’, a canyengue recorded by Francisco Canaro, on 20 March 1935, with music composed by Enrique Santos Discépolo in 1934, with lyrics by Enrique Santos Discépolo, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Pato, meaning ‘Duck’, a canyengue recorded by Orquesta Típica Victor, on 20 July 1926, with music composed by Ramón Collazo, with lyrics by Ramón Collazo.
  • Pampa, meaning ‘a reference to the treeless plains of Argentina’, a canyengue recorded by Francisco Canaro, on 24 March 1938, with music composed by Francisco Pracánico.
  • Mano a Mano, meaning ‘Hand by Hand’, a canyengue recorded by Francisco Lomuto, on 11 August 1944, with music composed by Carlos Gardel & José Razzano in 1923, with lyrics by Celedonio Flores, and sung by Albero Rivera.
  • Derecho Viejo, meaning ‘Old Law’, a canyengue recorded by Guardia Vieja in 2005, with music composed by Eduardo Arolas in 1917?.
  • Hotel Victoria, meaning ‘Hotel Victoria’, a canyengue recorded by La Tubatango in 2006, with music composed by Feliciano Latasa in 1906, with lyrics by Carlos Pesce.
  • Comme Il Faut, meaning ‘Properly (in French)’, a tango recorded by Fernández Fierro in 2001, with music composed by Eduardo Arolas, with lyrics by Gabriele Clausi.
  • Qué Miran, meaning ‘What They See’, a concierto recorded by Fernández Fierro in 2014, with music composed by Y. Venturin & Laborde.
  • Cafe Hans en Grietje – Serie Amsterdam, meaning ‘Café Hansel & Gretel’, a concierto recorded by Nestor Vaz Quinteto in 2015, with music composed by Nestor Vaz.
  • Las Cuarenta, meaning ‘The Fourties’, a canyengue recorded by Francisco Lomuto, on 30 July 1937, with music composed by Roberto Grela in 1936, with lyrics by Francisco Gorrindo, and sung by Jorge Omar.

And again, I am sorry…

2015-01 - Ann2xxfm has been experiencing a series of equipment failures and technical issues, unfortunately due to a variety of causes, including service failures from external providers such as Telstra. Practical steps are being taken to resolve the issues completely, including re-negotiating a new service agreement for streaming with a new provider, complete replacement of obsolete software, replacement of supporting infrastructure such as servers.You will understand that this takes time to do properly and that there can be interim issues as new systems are integrated with existing ones.

On top of all that, last weekend the broadcast signal from Black Mountain Tower was lost for a day and a half, a problem that is complicated by the requirement for access to the Tower for resolution. A strategy for resolving issues with the broadcast signal chain to Black Mountain Tower is still being pursued.

For now, for those listeners who missed the broadcast signal, or the internet stream, the complete episode for Sunday 20 November is available for a limited time for download from Patreon.com/tangocapital

And again, I am sorry for these interruptions. They will, I believe, resolve over coming weeks, and I will be making podcasts freely available so you don’t miss out too much.

Thank you for your patience, and I look forward to catching up with you this coming Sunday 27 November in the Tango Capital.

Roberto Firpo – the music

roberto-firpo

This week is focused completely on the music of Roberto Firpo, with a range of tangos, milongas and valses from 1935 to 1956. That’s the Tango Capital, Sunday at 7:00pm:

Image credit: https://tango.info/RoberFirpo

PLAYLIST:

  • Gran Muneca, a tango recorded by Roberto Firpo’s Cuarteto, on 8 January 1941, with music composed by Alfredo Bevilacqua, with lyrics by Antonio Polito.
  • El Bisturi, a tango recorded by Roberto Firpo’s Cuarteto, on 16 June 1941, with music composed by Roberto Firpo.
  • El Tapial, a tango recorded by Roberto Firpo’s Cuarteto, on 8 January 1941, with music composed by Alberto López Buchardo.
  • La Puñalada, meaning ‘The Stab’, a milonga recorded by Roberto Firpo , with music composed by Pintin Castellanos in 1933, with lyrics by Celedonio Flores.
  • Me Gusta Bailar, meaning ‘The Dance Pleases Me/I Like To Dance’, a milonga recorded by Roberto Firpo , on 21-26 January 1946, with music composed by Pintin Castellanos, with lyrics by Pintin Castellanos.
  • Organito De Suburbio, meaning ‘Suburban Organgrinder’, a milonga recorded by Roberto Firpo , on 7 August 1951, with music composed by Juan Carlos Caviello, with lyrics by Héctor César Zapalorti.
  • Cuidado Con Los Cincuenta, meaning ‘Take Care Of The Fifty’, a tango recorded by Roberto Firpo’s Cuarteto, on 24 July 1956, with music composed by Ángel Villoldo in 1907, with lyrics by Carlos Pesce & Antonio Polito.
  • Curda Completa, meaning ‘Completely Drunk’, a tango recorded by Roberto Firpo’s Cuarteto, on 2 May 1956, with music composed by Roberto Firpo.
  • El Pensiamiento, meaning ‘The Thinking’, a tango recorded by Roberto Firpo’s Cuarteto, on 22 August 1956, with music composed by José Martinez in 1936, with lyrics by Francisco García Jiménez.
  • Fantasma, meaning ‘Ghost’, a tango recorded by Roberto Firpo’s Orquesta, on 28 December 1939, with music composed by José Mario Maurano, with lyrics by Roberto De Prisco, and sung by Alberto Diale.
  • Cosas Olvidadas, meaning ‘Forgotten Things’, a tango recorded by Roberto Firpo’s Orquesta, on 28 September 1940, with music composed by Antonio Rodio, with lyrics by José Maria Contursi, and sung by Alberto Diale.
  • Escribeme, meaning ‘Write To Me’, a tango recorded by Roberto Firpo’s Orquesta, on 21 July 1942, with music composed by Giovanni Raimondo, with lyrics by Enrico Frati, and sung by Alberto Diale.
  • Desde El Alma, meaning ‘From The Soul’, a vals recorded by Roberto Firpo’s Cuarteto, on 21 May 1947, with music composed by Rosito Melo, with lyrics by Victor Piuma Vélez & Homero Manzi.
  • Angustias Del Corazon, meaning ‘Anguishes Of The Heart’, a vals recorded by Roberto Firpo’s Cuarteto, on 2 January 1942, with music composed by Roberto Firpo.
  • Noche Calurosa, meaning ‘Warm Night’, a vals recorded by Roberto Firpo’s Cuarteto, on 11 September 1944, with music composed by Roberto Firpo.
  • A Media Luz, meaning ‘At Half Light’, a tango recorded by Roberto Firpo’s Orquesta, on 19 October 1934, with music composed by Edgar Donato in 1925, with lyrics by Carlos César Lenzi, and sung by Carlos Varela.
  • La Bordadora, meaning ‘The Embroiderer’, a tango recorded by Roberto Firpo’s Orquesta, on 22 March 1935, with music composed by Roberto Firpo, with lyrics by Venancio Clauso, and sung by Carlos Varela.
  • Quejas, meaning ‘Complaints’, a tango recorded by Roberto Firpo’s Orquesta, on 13 May 1935, with music composed by José Cacopardo, with lyrics by Francisco García Jiménez, and sung by Carlos Varela.

Sunday, 13 November 2016: footnote

sexteto-juan-bauer

Shortly after the broadcast on Sunday 13 November I found a couple of references that note 13 September as the date of Juan Baüer’s death, thus contradicting my references that suggested 13 November. Another point to check next time I am in BsAs.

Image: Sexteto Juan Baüer at radio CX26 (Radio Uruguay).

Image Credit:  Museo y Centro de documentación AGADU.

Image from: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/462393086720777079/

Modern Tango World – now here’s the magazine

Tonight there is a remodern-tango-world-cover-5view of Modern Tango World, the new magazine that recently turned 1, and some post-Gotan Project music. Then the focus is on Uruguay with an introduction to the life and music of Juan ‘Firpito’ Baüer, and an interview with Nestor Vaz. That’s Tango Capital at 7:00pm AEDT tonight

PLAYLIST:

  • El Amanecer, meaning ‘The Dawn’, a tango written by Roberto Firpo and recorded by him on 4 January 1938.
  • No Te Quiero Más, meaning ‘I do not love you any more’, a tango recorded by Enrique Rodríguez, on 15 March 1940, with music composed by Juan Baüer, with lyrics by Juan Antonio Estape, and sung by Armando Moreno.
  • Adíos, Arrabal, meaning ‘Good-bye, Neighbourhood’, a tango recorded by Julio De Caro in 1930, with music composed by Juan Baüer in 1930, with lyrics by Carlos César Lenzi, and sung by Pedro Lauga.
  • Juventud, meaning ‘Youth’, a tango recorded by Carlos Gardel singing on 20 March 1930, with music composed by Juan Baüer in 1929, and with lyrics by Roberto Aubriot Barboza.
  • La Mano Encima, meaning ‘The Upper Hand’, a neotango recorded by Plaza Francia in 2014, with music and lyrics by Eduardo Makaroff, and sung by Catherine Ringer.
  • Cenizas, meaning ‘Ashes’, a neotango recorded by Plaza Francia in 2014, with music and lyrics by Eduardo Makaroff, and sung by Catherine Ringer.
  • La Muerte Del Ángel, meaning ‘Death of the Angel’, a concierto recorded by Nestor Vaz Quinteto in 2008 of music composed by Astor Piazzolla.
  • Palersur, a candombe written by Nestor Vaz in 2013 and recorded by Nestor Vaz Quinteto in 2015.