25 September 2016: footnote

Compared to recordings from the period prior to the rise of the soloist, tracks from modern operatic singers can be much longer. For the CD “My Latin Heart”, comparing José Carbó’s recordings of Mi Buenos Aires Querido with that of Carlos Gardel shows that Gardel’s recording is 2 minutes 38 seconds, whereas Carbó takes 3 minutes 17 seconds. Now this difference in length could be put down to arrangement of accompaniments and indeed there is a 6 second intro to Carbó’s version, but—comparing like with like—the first part of the song takes Gardel 24 seconds to sing, whereas Carbó takes 40 seconds – nearly twice as long.

Comparing versions of another Cancion Porteña, Caminito, this time the times are much closer at 2:30 and 2:20 for Carbó and Gardel respectively, but it is again Carbó that is longer, if not by much.

And compared to versions from orquestas presenting tango music for dancing, the discrepancy is equally real. Comparing the first stanza and chorus of Uno from Carbó with Biagi’s version of 1944 with Acuna singing—and trying not to get distracted by Biagi’s very busy arrangement—Carbó takes 1 minute and 51 seconds to sing what Acuna sings in 1 minute 32 seconds, that is Carbó takes over 20% longer. Maure singing in D’Arienzo’s 1943 recording is even snappier, and Carbó takes more than 25% longer. Even Roldán singing Canaro’s version from the same year takes only 1 minute and 36 seconds which means that Carbó takes nearly 16% longer.

Looking at another piece tells the same story: the second and third parts of En Esta Tarde Gris as sung by Amor with Canaro in 1941 takes 1 minute and 20 seconds and sung by Fiorentino with Troilo also in 1941 takes 1 minute and 24 seconds, whereas Carbó takes 1 minute and 35 seconds to sing the matching stanza and chorus, 13% and nearly 19% longer respectively.

The cross section of comparison tracks for the 1947 version of El Choclo is different: rather than comparing to two versions from the same year for El Choclo I have selected versions spanning 1948 to 1957, and again, the same pattern is repeated. D’Amario singing with Vargas in 1957 selected only a short subset of words (Por tu milagro…de querer…/Al evocarte…de un bandoneón) so I matched the other selections to this. Arenas singing with Canaro in 1948 is predictably the quickest, getting through it in 37 seconds. Beron with Troilo in 1952 takes 56 seconds—although in this version there is a significant amount of the tempo variation for which Troilo became notorious so some bits are faster, some bits are slower. Vargas with D’Amario in 1957 is the slowest at 53 seconds, and he is the only one that actually matches Carbó – but then, Ángel Vargas was a soloist who went out on his own and some comparability may be expected. So in this case comparing Carbó to Canaro’s version indicates a 35% increase in time taken—although this needs to be understood in the context of a piece that is much faster than most tangos – closer to 70 than 60bpm.

In short, overall the tempo of Carbó’s singing is much slower than earlier productions, with the length typically in the range 15-25% longer. Put another way, whereas a typical tango speed is around 60 beats per minute, these are ranging below 50 beats per minute. This is one of the reasons why recordings by modern operatic singers are really not for dancing—they are just too slow.

My Latin Heart – the CD

grigoryan-brothers-my-latin-heart-album-art

This week I am revisiting My Latin Heart, but this time from the perspective of the CD from José Carbó and the Grigoryan brothers.

Some music from Sassone and Castillo, and the final part of the interview with Nadia Piave round out another cantor-oriented edition.

7:00pm this Sunday 25 September:

The image is of the CD My Latin Heart,  from José Carbó and the Grigoryan brothers in 2012.

PLAYLIST:

  • Canción de Cuna, from Florindo Sassone, meaning Lullaby, recorded on 19 May 1947, composed in 1928, with music by José María Rizzuti, with lyrics by José Antonio Diez Gómez, sung by Jorgé Casal
  • Y Todavia Te Quiero, from Héctor Varela, meaning And I Still Want You, recorded on 27 July 1956, with music by Luciano Leocata, lyrics by Abel Aznar, sung by Rodolfo Lesica
  • Vida Mía, from Carlos Garcia at Radio El Mundo, from 1957, meaning My Life, composed in 1934, with music by Osvaldo Fresedo, with lyrics by Emilio Augusto Oscar Fresedo, sung by Héctor Pacheco
  • El Vals De La Quince Años, from Carlos Garcia at Radio El Mundo, from 1957, meaning The Waltz of 15 years, with music by Agustín Minotti, with lyrics by Agustín Minotti, sung by Héctor Pacheco
  • Caminito, from Grigoryan brothers, from 2011, meaning Little Pathway, composed in 1926, with music by Juan De Dios Filiberto, with lyrics by Gabino Coria Peñaloza, sung by José Carbó
  • El Flete, from La Tubatango, from 2006, composed in 1916, with music by Vicente Greco, instrumental but original lyrics by Gerónimo Gradito
  • Caminito, from Francisco Canaro, from 1927, meaning Little Pathway, recorded on 10 March 1927, with music by Juan De Dios Filiberto, instrumental but original lyrics by Gabino Coria Peñaloza
  • Oblivion, from Grigoryan brothers, recorded in 2011, with music by Astor Piazzolla, with lyrics by Julian Clerc, sung by José Carbó
  • Para Qué Vivir AsÍ, from Alfredo Gobbi, meaning To Live Like This, recorded on 9 June 1953, with music by Luciano Leocata, with lyrics by Reinaldo Yiso, sung by Jorgé Maciel

18 September 2016: footnote…

Osvaldo Cordero

osvaldo-sosa-cordero

  • Some follow-up research on Osvaldo Cordero, the subject of this week’s edition of Tango Capital, throws some doubt on the date he actually died. I have  2 references that he died on 18 September 1986, and hence had chosen to highlight his music this evening, but the citation for his Konex award in 1985 has been updated to show 19 September as the relevant date. Next time I am in BsAs I will check the records.

Image credit: http://www.fundacionkonex.org/b2148-osvaldo-sosa-cordero

José Carbó & the Grigoryan brothers

It’s cantores all the way down this week…2016-09-11-jose-carbo-the-grigoryan-brothers

Join me in Healesville, Victoria, for a concert of tango and guitars with baritone José Carbó and the Grigoryan brothers,  take a further look at Nadia Piave‘s perspective as a tango soprano in the third of a four-part interview, and explore the songs of Cordero. That’s the tango hour this week, Sunday evening from 7:00pm:

PLAYLIST:

  • De Pura Cepa, a milonga recorded by Osvaldo Fresedo, on 20 May 1953, with music composed by José Ceglie, with lyrics by Osvaldo Cordero.
  • Yo Llevo Un Tango En El Alma, meaning ‘I wear or have a tango in the soul’, a tango recorded by Emilio Balcarce in 1945, with music composed by Osvaldo Cordero, with lyrics by Osvaldo Cordero, and sung by Alberto Castillo.
  • Charol, meaning ‘Patent Leaher’, a candombe recorded by Emilio Balcarce, on 3 March 1944, with music composed by Osvaldo Cordero, with lyrics by Osvaldo Cordero, and sung by Alberto Castillo.
  • No Comprendes, meaning ‘You Don’t Understand’, a vals recorded by Emilio Balcarce, on 28 November 1950, with music composed by Osvaldo Cordero, with lyrics by Osvaldo Cordero, and sung by Alberto Castillo.
  • Uno, meaning ‘One’, a tango recorded by Grigoryan Brothers, on 2011, with music composed by Mariano Mores in 1943, with lyrics by Enrique Santos Discépolo, and sung by José Carbó.
  • Buenos Noches, Buenos Aires, meaning ‘Good Night,, Buenos Aires’, a tango recorded by Carlos Di Sarli, on 16 January 1958, with music composed by Sebastián Piana, with lyrics by Osvaldo Sosa Cordero, and sung by Jorgé Duran.
  • Organito de la Tarde, meaning ‘Street Organist of the Afternoon’, a tango recorded by Emilio Balcarce, on 9 April 1947, with music composed by Cátulo Castillo in 1924, with lyrics by José González Castillo, and sung by Alberto Marino.
  • Yuyo Verde, meaning ‘Green Herbs’, a concierto in 1989, with music composed by Domingo Federico in 1944, with lyrics by Homero Exposito, and sung by Roberto Goyeneche.
  • Chiquilín de Bachin, meaning ‘Waif of Bachin (Café)’, a vals in 2003, with music composed by Astor Piazzolla, with lyrics by Horacio Ferrer, and sung by Guillermo Fernandez.

 

Nadia Piave – talking about singing tango

Nadia Piave & Ann Smith - 18 July 2016 - lo-rez

Join me in tracing the influence of Francisco Fiorentini on tango singing, and further explore the connections of tango singing with Italian and French singing traditions with Nadia Piave.

That’s the tango hour, 7:00pm this Sunday 11 September.

PLAYLIST:

  • El Panuelito, meaning ‘The Handkerchief’, a tango recorded by Francisco Canaro, on 25 July 1928, with music composed by Juan de Dios Filiberto in 1920, with lyrics by Gabino Coria Peñaloza.
  • Ladrón, meaning ‘Thief’, a tango recorded by Juan Carlos Cobián, on 16 July 1928, with music composed by Juan Carlos Cobián, with lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino.
  • Del Tiempo Guapo, meaning ‘Good Time’, a milonga recorded by Anibal Troilo, on 21 November 1941, with music composed by Vicente Fiorentino, with lyrics by Marcelo de la Ferrere, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino.
  • Malena, meaning ‘Malena (a woman’s name)’, a tango recorded by Anibal Troilo, on 8 January 1942, with music composed by Lucio Demare, with lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino.
  • Corrientes y Esmeralda, meaning ‘the intersection of two cross-streets in Buenos Aires, in he heart of ‘tango territory”, a tango recorded by Francisco Fiorentino (Astor Piazzolla leading), on 19 May 1945, with music composed by Francisco Pracánico, with lyrics by Celedonio Flores, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino.
  • Tu Diagnóstico, meaning ‘Your Diagnosis’, a vals recorded by Anibal Troilo, on 9 October 1941, with music composed by Jose Betinotti, with lyrics by Jose Betinotti, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino.
  • Tabernero, meaning ‘Innkeeper or Publican’, a tango recorded by José Basso, on 27 May 1949, with music composed by Miguel Cafre & Fausto Frontera, with lyrics by Raúl Costa Olivieri, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino.
  • El Choclo, meaning ‘The Corncob’, a tango recorded by Tango Siempre in 2004, with music composed by Ángel Villoldo.
  • Malena, meaning ‘Malena (a woman’s name)’, a tango recorded by Tango Paradiso in 2012, with music composed by Lucio Demare, with lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Marina Varney.

Orquesta La Luna

2016-07-30 - Orquesta La Luna - front

This week the focus is on the dancable Enrique Rodriguez, we check out the new Orquesta, La Luna, and interview Sydney tango singer Nadia Piave.

The tango hour, 7:00pm to 8:00pm, this Sunday 4 September:

PLAYLIST:

  • Pobre Soñador, meaning ‘Poor Dreamer’, a tango recorded by Edgardo Donato, on 21 June 1933, with music composed by Edgardo Donato, with lyrics by Manuel Romero, and sung by Felix Gutiérrez.
  • Llorar Por Una Mujer, meaning ‘To Cry For A Woman’, a tango recorded by Enrique Rodriguez, on 23 July 1941, with music composed by Enrique Rodriguez, with lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo, and sung by Armando Moreno.
  • Salud, Dinero y Amor, meaning ‘Health, Money & Love’, a vals recorded by Enrique Rodriguez, on 25 July 1939, with music composed by Rodolfo Sciammarella in 1939, with lyrics by Rodolfo Sciammarella, and sung by Roberto Flores.
  • Café, meaning ‘Café’, a tango recorded by Enrique Rodriguez, on 9 January 1946, with music composed by Enrique Rodriguez, with lyrics by Horacio Sanguinett, and sung by Armando Moreno.
  • Felicia, meaning ‘Felica (a woman’s name)’, a tango recorded by Juan D’Arienzo, on 1 September 1939, with music composed by Enrique Saborido, with lyrics by Carlos Mauricio Pacheco.
  • Tamboriles, meaning ‘Small Drums’, a candombe recorded by Enrique Rodriguez, on 30 October 1956, with music composed by José Segundo Matteo Yannini, with lyrics by Gregorio E Brun Elizalde, and sung by Omar Quiroz & Oscar Galán.
  • Felicia, meaning ‘Felica (a woman’s name)’, a tango recorded by Fabio Hager in 2008, with music composed by Enrique Saborido, with lyrics by Carlos Mauricio Pacheco.
  • Absurdo, meaning ‘Absurd’, a vals recorded by Adriana Varela in 1998, with music composed by Virgilio Expósito, with lyrics by Homero Expósito, and sung by Adriana Varela.
  • Oblivion, meaning ‘I Forget’, a concierto recorded by Quinteto Suarez Paz in 1996, with music composed by Astor Piazzolla, with lyrics by  Julian Clerc, and sung by Beatriz Paz.