Canyengue

2016-11-27-canyengue-at-bash-2016And picking up on the Canyengue theme established last week, this week’s edition is devoted to a range of canyengue music from Canaro, Lomuto, Firpo, and Orquesta Típica Victor, as well as modern productions from La Tubatango and Cuarteto Guardia Vieja. That’s Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm

Image:  Myk Dowling leads a demonstration dance for the canyengue workshop at Buenos Aires In The Southern Highlands (BASH 2016) last weekend.

 

 

PLAYLIST:

  • No Hay Que Hacerse Mala Sangre, meaning ‘There’s No Need For Bad Blood’, a canyengue recorded by Francisco Canaro, on 20 March 1935, with music composed by Francisco Canaro, with lyrics by Ivo Pelay, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Alma de Bandoneón, meaning ‘Soul Of The Bandoneón’, a canyengue recorded by Francisco Canaro, on 20 March 1935, with music composed by Enrique Santos Discépolo in 1935, with lyrics by Enrique Santos Discépolo & Luis César Amadori, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Noches de Buenos Aires, meaning ‘Nights Of Buenos Aires’, a canyengue recorded by Francisco Canaro, on 23 April 1935, with music composed by Alberto Soifer in 1935, with lyrics by Manuel Romero, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Oi, Malevo, meaning ‘Hey, Ruffian’, a canyengue recorded by Roberto Firpo, on 12 December 1929, with music composed by Juan José Buscaglia.
  • Falsa Alegria, meaning ‘False Joy’, a canyengue recorded by Roberto Firpo, on 8 May 1929.
  • Organito Del Suburbio, meaning ‘Suburban Organ-player’, a canyengue recorded by Roberto Firpo, on 26 June 1929, with music composed by Antonio Bonavena, with lyrics by Roberto Fermin Torres, and sung by Teófilo Ibáñez.
  • El Pardo Cejas, meaning ‘Brown Eyebrows’, a canyengue recorded by La Tubatango in 2006, with music composed by Prudencio Aragón and lyrics by Antonio Polito.
  • El Flete, meaning ‘The Racehorse’, a canyengue recorded by La Tubatango in 2006, with music composed by Vicente Greco in 1916, with lyrics by Gerónimo Gradito.
  • La Morocha, meaning ‘The Brunette’, a canyengue recorded by La Tubatango in 2006, with music composed by Enrique Saborido in 1905, with lyrics by Ángel Villoldo.
  • Filo Misho, a canyengue recorded by Orquesta Típica Victor, on 8 May 1930.
  • Recuerdo, meaning ‘A Memory’, a canyengue recorded by Orquesta Típica Victor, on 23 April 1930, with music composed by Osvaldo Pugliese in 1924, with lyrics by Eduardo Moreno, and sung by Roberto Diaz.
  • El Chamuyo, meaning ‘The Chattering’, a canyengue recorded by Orquesta Típica Victor in 1930.
  • 9 de Julio, meaning ‘9th of July’ (a national day of independence), a canyengue recorded by Cuarteto Guardia Vieja in 2005, with music composed by José Luis Padula, with lyrics by Lito Bayardo.
  • Re Fa Si, a canyengue recorded by Cuarteto Guardia Vieja in 2005, with music composed by Enrique Delfino.
  • Jueves, meaning ‘Thursday’, a canyengue recorded by Cuarteto Guardia Vieja in 2005, with music composed by Rafael Rossi & Udelino Toranzo.
  • Intimas, meaning ‘Intimate’, a canyengue recorded by Francisco Lomuto, on 11 August 1944, with music composed by Alfonso Lacueva, with lyrics by Ricardo Luis Brignolo, and sung by Carlos Galarce.
  • Desagravio, meaning ‘Grief’, a canyengue recorded by Francisco Lomuto, on 13 December 1944, with music composed by Francisco Lomuto, with lyrics by Homero Manzi & José María Contursi, and sung by Alberto Rivera.
  • Mano a Mano, meaning ‘Hand By Hand’, a canyengue recorded by Francisco Lomuto, on 11 August 1944, with music composed by Carlos Gardel & José Razzano in 1923, with lyrics by Celedonio Flores, and sung by Alberto Rivera.

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