Tango Capital – By The Lake

Tango music playing over the lake, a smooth surface for dancing – and all it needs it you. Bring a dance partner or drop by for a chat. Covid-19-safe tango in the Tango Capital, every Tuesday throughout the summer.

DAY: Tuesdays, from 1 December.

TIME: 5:30pm-7:30pm (unless actually raining)

WHERE: Queen Elizabeth Terrace, Parkes.In front of the Reconciliation Monument on the south bank of Lake Burley Griffin, near the Waterfront Restaurant, Parliamentary Triangle, Canberra.

Music from the De Caro brothers

Last edition looked at the professional trajectory of the De Caro brothers. While it is Julio De Caro that is remembered, and who’s birthday has been selected as “Tango Day”, he would not have been as successful without his brother Francisco. This edition explores their legacy in more detail. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: The first De Caro sextet, in 1924. Left to right: Julio De Caro (leader & cornet-violin), Francisco De Caro (piano), Pedro Maffia (bandoneón, Enrique Krauss (double bass), Pedro Laurenz (bandoneón), Emilio De Caro (violin). Image in public domain.

Tango Paradiso

The trajectory of Tango Paradiso reflects that of tango in some key ways. Listen in to explore their music, to look at the life and times of Julio De Caro, and for a quick round up of What’s On. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Tango Paradiso –  https://www.tangoparadiso.info/

Moshlo Thackrah and his partner, the flautist Carla Thackrah, formed the core of Tango Paradiso from its initial incarnation as a duo of Moshlo on violin and Daniel Rojas on piano through to quartet and sextet arrangements incorporating a range of musicians from Australia and Argentina. Marina Varney joined as singer in 2003; Nadia Piave joined as singer in 2013. From 2004 Argentine musician Facundo Bericat also undertook much of the arrangements.

Paul Hankinson (2004) and Argentine Facundo Bericat (2006) succeeded Daniel Rojas on piano, although Rojas returned in 2013. Early on Marko Deferri featured on accordion and remained through 2013; Argentinean bandoneonista Xavier Sanchez joined them in recordings made in 2006. Violinists included Joel (2002), Roland Aneney (2004), Romano Crivici (2013), and Eugenie Shaw(2009). Bassists included Andrew Shaw (2003-2009), John Varney (2004), Bella Brown (2013) and Argentine Sergio Rivas (2006). Other musicians have included Christian Gante in Australia, and Fernando Dieguez and Hugo Sanchez in Argentina.

PLAYLIST:

  • El Cabure, from lunfardo, meaning ‘The Ladies’ Man’; recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 6 December 1951; a tango with music composed by Arturo De Bassi, first recorded in 1913.  
  • Mala Pinta, meaning ‘Bad Look’, and also known as ‘Mala Estampa’; recorded by Julio De Caro on 27 August 1928; a tango with music composed by Julio De Caro & Francisco De Caro.
  • Todo Corazón, meaning ‘All Heart’; recorded by Julio De Caro in 1924; a tango with music composed by Julio De Caro   in 1921 and lyrics by José María Ruffett.  
  • Saca Chispas, meaning ‘Takes Sparks’; recorded by Julio De Caro on 10 March 1938; a milonga with music composed by Julio De Caro, and sung by Luis Díaz.  
  • Flores Negras, meaning ‘Black Flowers’; recorded by Julio De Caro on 16 September 1942; a tango with music composed by Francisco De Caro, first recorded in 1927.  
  • Mi Dolor, meaning ‘My Grief’; recorded by Julio De Caro on 27 October 1950; a tango with music composed by Carlos Marcucci, first recorded in 1926, lyrics by Orlando Verri, and sung by Orlando Verri.  
  • Volver, meaning ‘To Return’; from the collection ‘Tango Paradiso’ released in 2005, recorded by Tango Paradiso in 2004; a tango with music composed by Carlos Gardel in 1934, lyrics by Alfredo La Pera, and sung by Marina Varney.  
  • Nueve De Julio, meaning ‘9th of July’; from the collection ‘Tango Paradiso’ released in 2005, recorded by Tango Paradiso in 2004; a tango with music composed by José Luis Padula, first recorded in 1916 and lyrics by Lito Bayardo. The name is a reference to a significant day in Argentina’s struggle for independence from Spain.  
  • Boedo; from the collection ‘Argentino’ released in 2006, recorded by Tango Paradiso in 2006; a tango with music composed by Julio De Caro in 1928 and lyrics by Francisco Bautista. The name is a reference to the suburb of Boedo in Buenos Aires, which is in turn named for Mariano Boedo, a politician of the independence movement .  
  • Fievre, meaning ‘Fever’, and also known as ‘Fiebre de Tango’; from the collection ‘Tango Paradiso’ released in 2005, recorded by Tango Paradiso in 2004; a tango with music composed by Astor Piazzolla.  Composed 1955 or earlier.
  • A Don Agustín Bardi, and also known as ‘Don Agustín Bardi’; from the collection ‘Argentino’ released in 2006, recorded by Tango Paradiso in 2006; a tango with music composed by Horacio Salgán, first recorded in 1950. The name is a reference to the tango musician of that name.  
  • Corralera, from the collection ‘Argentino’ released in 2006, recorded by Tango Paradiso in 2006; a milonga with music composed by Anselmo A Aieta, first recorded in 1956. The name is a reference to a person living in the suburb of Corrales, near the stockyards of the abbotoirs that fed the beef export industry.  
  • Nocturna, meaning ‘Nocturne’; from the collection ‘Tango Paradiso’ released in 2005, recorded by Tango Paradiso in 2004; a milonga with music composed by Julián Plaza, first recorded in 1961.  

Tango Guitars II

The guitar was the original source of rhythm in tango music, until it was ousted by the piano in 1914, and from then on the guitar was only heard as a feature instrument at milongas, if at all. This edition is the second of a series exploring the music of the bailable tradition as played by modern guitarists. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Ann Smith – Tango Guitars at La Catedral milonga, 2015.

Tango In The 21st century (IV)

One of the joys of travelling to Buenos Aires is the opportunity to dance to live music most nights of the week. The musical techniques and traditions of tango are still found there, transmitted now as much by formal institutions as from musician to musician, and so while there are many ensembles developing tango in new directions, there are also others firmly focused on dancing tango. Live music was of course the standard in the hey-day of tango, bringing variations in beat and styling that offer the dancer opportunities to improvise. This is the fourth in a series of special editions exploring the music of these newer ensembles. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: CD covers for the music acknowledged in the playlist.

Edgardo Donato

Last edition looked at the legacy of Uruguayan* orquesta leader, pianist, and all-round party-boy Edgardo Donato, and this edition explores his legacy of recordings and compositions in more detail.  That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

* Strictly, he was born in Buenos Aires, but grew up and first practiced as a musician and band leader in Montevideo.

Image: Edgardo Donato: http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-lvQhs3K7Yek/U0wRL0SZ_jI/AAAAAAAANSw/Hi2kuP-vFKo/s1600/imagesed2.jpg

PLAYLIST:

  • Tierrita, meaning ‘Little Land’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 14 September 1934; a tango with music composed by Agustín Bardi, first recorded in 1922 and lyrics by Jesús Fernández Blanco.  
  • Carnaval De Mi Barrio, meaning ‘Festival Of My Suburb’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 27 March 1939; a tango with music composed by Luis Rubistein, first recorded in 1938, lyrics by Luis Rubistein, and sung by Romeo Gavioli, Horacio Lagos, & Lita Morales.  
  • Ella Es Así, meaning ‘She Is Like That’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 10 October 1938; a milonga with music composed by Luis Martino, lyrics by Manuel Carretero, and sung by Horacio Lagos.  
  • Sacale Punta, meaning ‘Sharpen It’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 9 March 1938; a milonga with music composed by Osvaldo Donato, lyrics by Sandalio Gómez, and sung by Horacio Lagos.  
  • El Adíos, meaning ‘The Farewell’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 2 April 1938; a tango with music composed by Maruja Pacheco Huergo in 1937, lyrics by Virgilio San Clemente, and sung by Horacio Lagos.  
  • Sinfonía De Arrabal, meaning ‘Suburban Symphony’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 5 April 1940; a tango with music composed by Maruja Pacheco Huergo, first recorded in 1939, lyrics by Maruja Pacheco Huergo, and sung by Romeo Gavioli, Horacio Lagos, & Lita Morales.  
  • Noches Correntinas, meaning ‘Nights Of Corrientes’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 14 November 1939; a vals with music composed by Juan Giliberti, lyrics by Juan Giliberti, and sung by Romeo Gavioli and Horacio Lagos. The name is a reference to the province of Corrientes in the north of Argentina .  
  • Estrellita Mía, meaning ‘My Little Star’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 30 September 1940; a vals with music composed by Alberto Soifer, lyrics by Roberto Ratto, and sung by Romeo Gavioli, Horacio Lagos, & Lita Morales.  
  • Triqui-Trá, and also known as ‘Triqui Tra’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 24 January 1940; a tango with music composed by Edgardo Donato and lyrics by Maruja Pacheco Huergo.  
  • La Caída De La Estantería, meaning ‘The Fall Of The Bookshelf’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 5 February 1935; a tango with music composed by Edgardo Donato, lyrics by Luis Rubistein, and sung by Hugo del Carril.  
  • Mañana, meaning ‘Tomorrow’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 10 March 1936; a tango with music composed by Edgardo Donato, lyrics by Ivo Pelay, and sung by Felíx Gutíerrez.  
  • La Gran Aldea, meaning ‘The Great Village’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 23 March 1944; a tango with music composed by Edgardo Donato, lyrics by Horacio Sanguinetti, and sung by Jorge Denis.  
  • Volvé, meaning ‘I Return’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 21 November 1931; a tango with music composed by Edgardo Donato, lyrics by Luis Bayon Herrera, and sung by Mercedes Carné.  
  • La Milonga Que Faltaba, meaning ‘The Milonga That’s Gone’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 5 February 1938; a milonga with music composed by Edgardo Donato, lyrics by Carlos Pesce, and sung by Horacio Lagos.  
  • Cara Negra, meaning ‘Dark Beloved’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 11 March 1942; a milonga with music composed by José Rótulo, lyrics by Edgardo Donato, and sung by Horacio Lagos.  
  • Riachuelo; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 28 June 1934; a tango with music composed by Edgardo Donato, lyrics by Maximo José Orsi, and sung by Antonio Maida. The name is a reference to the Riachuelo River that runs through Buenos Aires and empties into the Rio Del Plata at Boca (the rivermouth). .  
  • Pobre Soñador, meaning ‘Poor Dreamer’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 21 June 1933; a tango with music composed by Edgardo Donato, lyrics by Manuel Romero, and sung by Felíx Gutiérrez.  
  • El Acomodo, meaning ‘The Deal’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 11 September 1933; a tango with music composed by Edgardo Donato.  
  • Mi Serenata, meaning ‘My Serenade’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 11 January 1940; a tango with music composed by Edgardo Donato, lyrics by Juan Carlos Thorry, and sung by Romeo Gavioli and Lita Morales.  

Tango 22

Jessica Ipkendanz and Hugo Alvarez provided the musical underpinning of Australia’s first local tango show of the 21st century, “Una Historia Del Tango”, and this edition takes a retrospective look at their interpretation of tango classics and more, through their CD, Tango 22. Then the legacy of light-hearted music from Edgardo Donato features, and there is a brief run-down on what is happening around Australia for tangueros. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image:  CD cover for the music acknowledged in the playlist.

PLAYLIST:

  • Valsecito Criollo, meaning ‘Little Creole Waltz’; recorded by Héctor Varela on 1 November 1955; a vals with music composed by Lidio Fasoli, first recorded in 1937 and lyrics by Francisco García Jiménez.  
  • Gato, meaning ‘Cat’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 12 February 1937; a tango with music composed by Edgardo Donato, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Horacio Lagos.
  • Julián; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 1 December 1950; a tango with music composed by Edgardo Donato in 1924 and lyrics by José Luis Panizza. This tango is dedicated to the Afro-Uruguayan musician Julián Gonzalez, a drummer. 
  • A Media Luz, meaning ‘At Twilight’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 13 October 1941; a tango with music composed by Edgardo Donato in 1925, lyrics by Carlos César Lenzi, and sung by Horacio Lagos.  
  • Se Va La Vida, meaning ‘Life Is Gone’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 7 October 1936; a tango with music composed by Edgardo Donato & Roberto Zerrillo in 1929, lyrics by Luis Mario, and sung by Horacio Lagos.
  • El Huracán, meaning ‘The Hurricane’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 9 December 1932; a tango with music composed by Edgardo Donato & Osvaldo Donato, lyrics by Nolo López, and sung by Félix Gutierrez.  
  • Porteña Linda, meaning ‘Beautiful Woman of Buenos Aires’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 30 April 1940; a milonga with music composed by Edgardo Donato, lyrics by Horacio Sanguinetti, and sung by Horacio Lagos.  
  • Nostalgias, meaning ‘Nostalgias’; from the collection ‘Tango22’ released in 2001, recorded by Jessica Ipkendanz and Hugo Alvarez in 2001; a tango with music composed by Juan Carlos Cobián in 1936 and lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo.  
  • El Choclo, meaning ‘The Corncob’; from the collection ‘Tango22’ released in 2001, recorded by Jessica Ipkendanz and Hugo Alvarez in 2001; a tango with music composed by Ángel Villoldo, first recorded in 1903. Notes: 1. Ángel Villoldo wrote the original lyrics and Irene Villoldo (Villoldo’s sister) claimed that ‘El Choclo’ is about a blond-haired pimp. Others have claimed that the name is a phallic reference, and certainly Villoldo’s lyrics can support that interpretation.  2. Villoldo added extra lines to the lyrics prior to 1905 but none of his lyrics were published with the sheet music. 3. Mariambo-Catán added 3 lines in the 1930s; these were sung by Ángel Vargas with Ángel D’Agostino in 1941. 4. Completely different lyrics were written in 1947 by Enrique Santos Discépolo. These refer to the origins of tango and were sung by Libertad Lamarque in the Mexican film ‘Gran Casino’. 5. ‘Kiss of Fire’ is USA song written in 1952 by Lester Alien and Robert Hill and set to the music of ‘El Choclo’ with minor adaptations (last 2 bars of the first section changed; 2 short phrases added to the second section; third section omitted). Music possibly written in 1898; definitely first played in 1903 by the orquesta of José Luis Roncallo at the ‘El Americano’ restaurant in at 966 Cangallo (now Calle Teniente General Perón); sheet music published in 1905 without lyrics.
  • Mi Buenos Aires Querido, meaning ‘My Beloved Buenos Aires’; from the collection ‘Tango22’ released in 2001, recorded by Jessica Ipkendanz and Hugo Alvarez in 2001; a tango with music composed by Carlos Gardel in 1934, lyrics by Alfredo Le Pera, and sung by Jessica Ipkendanz and Hugo Alvarez.  
  • Silueta Porteña, meaning ‘Shadow Of A Buenos Aires Woman’; from the collection ‘Tango22’ released in 2001, recorded by Jessica Ipkendanz and Hugo Alvarez in 2001; a milonga with music composed by Nicolas Luis Cuccaro & Juan Ventura Cuccaro in 1936 and lyrics by Orlando D’Aniello & Ernesto Noli.  
  • Taquito Militar, meaning ‘Military Heels’; from the collection ‘Tango22’ released in 2001, recorded by Jessica Ipkendanz and Hugo Alvarez in 2001; a milonga with music composed by Mariano Mores in 1952.  
  • Desde El Alma, meaning ‘From The Soul’, from the collection ‘Tango22’ released in 2001, recorded by Jessica Ipkendanz and Hugo Alvarez in 2001; a vals with music composed by Rosita Melo in 1911. There are two sets of lyrics: one by Melo’s husband, Victor Piuma Vélez around 1922; the other set by Homero Manzi and written in 1948, for the film ‘Pobre Mi Madre Querida’. 
  • Tango22, from the collection ‘Tango22’ released in 2001, recorded by Jessica Ipkendanz and Hugo Alvarez in 2001; a tango with music composed by Hugo Alvarez.  

Tango in the 21st century (III)

This edition is the third in a series showcasing the modern manifestation of tango ensembles in Argentina. They are often up to a full orquesta tipica format of 10 or more musicians in size. Tango teaching has been instituted through university studies and through conservatoriums such as Escuela de Tango Emilio Balcarce to maintain and develop this aspect of Argentine culture. These institutions provide a training ground for young musicians in tango musical techniques as well as the styling of some of the great tango ensembles. And as well there is a stream of musicians that come together independently of these formal institutions, drawn by the possibility of income from tourism as well as by a love of tango music.  That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: CD covers for the music acknowledged in the playlist.

PLAYLIST:

  • Mala Junta, meaning ‘Bad Company’; from the collection ‘De La Guardia Vieja’ released in 2005, recorded by Joaquín Amenabar in 2005; a tango with music composed by Julio De Caro & Pedro Laurenz in 1927 and lyrics by Juan Miguel Velich.  
  • Shusheta, meaning ‘The Aristocrat’, and also known as ‘El Aristócrata’; from the collection ‘De La Guardia Vieja’ released in 2005, recorded by Joaquín Amenabar in 2005; a tango with music composed by Juan Carlos Cobián in 1920 and lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo.  
  • Guardia Vieja, meaning ‘Old Guard’; from the collection ‘De La Guardia Vieja’ released in 2005, recorded by Joaquín Amenabar in 2005; a tango with music composed by Julio De Caro.  
  • La Viruta, from lunfardo; from the collection ‘Envasado En Origen’ released in 2001, recorded by Fernando Fierro in 2001; a tango with music composed by Vicente Greco in 1912 and lyrics by Ernesto Temes. The name is a reference to the strong emotions evoked by the bandoneón and expressed through on the dancefloor.  
  • Milonguero Viejo, meaning ‘Old Tango Dancer’, and also known as ‘Bailarín Porteño; Fresedo’; from the collection ‘Envasado En Origen’ released in 2001, recorded by Fernando Fierro in 2001; a tango with music composed by Carlos Di Sarli in 1926 and lyrics by Enrique Carrera Sotelo. Carlos Di Sarli dedicated this to Osvaldo Fresedo. 
  • Cuesta Abajo, meaning ‘Downhill’; from the collection ‘Envasado En Origen’ released in 2001, recorded by Fernando Fierro in 2001; a tango with music composed by Carlos Gardel in 1934 and lyrics by Alfredo La Pera.  
  • Ensueños, meaning ‘Dreams’; from the collection ‘Loca’ released in 2006, recorded by Orquesta La Excelsior in 2006; a tango with music composed by Carlos Di Sarli and lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo.  
  • Tu Pálida Voz, meaning ‘Your Pale Voice’; from the collection ‘Loca’ released in 2006, recorded by Orquesta La Excelsior in 2006; a vals composed in 1942 and lyrics by Homero Manzi.  
  • Boedo, from the collection ‘Loca’ released in 2006, recorded by Orquesta La Excelsior in 2006; a tango with music composed by Julio De Caro in 1928 and lyrics by Francisco Bautista Rimoli. The name is a reference to a working class suburb of that name in Buenos Aires..  
  • Nieblas Del Riachuelo, meaning ‘Fogs Of The Riachuelo’, and also known as ‘Niebla Del Riachuelo’; from the collection ‘Tango Contaminado’ released in 2010, recorded by Quinteto Negro La Boca in 2010; a tango with music composed by Juan Carlos Cobián in 1937 and lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo. The name is a reference to the Riachuelo River that empties into Rio Del Plata at the suburb of La Boca.  
  • Percal, meaning ‘Cotton’; from the collection ‘Tango Contaminado’ released in 2010, recorded by Quinteto Negro La Boca in 2010; a tango with music composed by Domingo Federico in 1943 and lyrics by Homero Expósito. The name is a reference to the cotton fabric widely used for women’s dresses.  
  • El Andariego, meaning ‘The Wanderer’; from the collection ‘Tango Contaminado’ released in 2010, recorded by Quinteto Negro La Boca in 2010; a tango with music composed by Alfredo J Gobbi.  
  • El Amanecer, meaning ‘The Dawn’; from the collection ‘Tango Bailable: The Roots Of Tango vol.1’ released in 2009, recorded by Orquesta Típica Buenos Aires in 2009; a tango with music composed by Roberto Firpo.  
  • La Morocha, meaning ‘The Dark-Haired Woman’; from the collection ‘Tango Bailable: The Roots Of Tango vol.1’ released in 2009, recorded by Orquesta Típica Buenos Aires in 2009; a tango with music composed by Enrique Saborido in 1905 and lyrics by Ángel Villoldo.  
  • Bien Porteña, from the collection ‘Tango Bailable: The Roots Of Tango vol.1’ released in 2009, recorded by Orquesta Típica Buenos Aires in 2009; a milonga with music composed by Enrique Alessio. The name is a reference to a woman of Buenos Aires, a “Porteña”.  
  • De Puro Curda, meaning ‘Completely Drunk’; from the collection ‘D’Arienzo En El Corazón’ released in 2018, recorded by Pablo Ramos & Los Heredos del Compás in 2018; a tango with music composed by Carlos Olmedo, lyrics by Abel Aznar & Hugo Di Carlo, and sung by Pablo Ramos. The name is a reference to Y.  
  • Andate Por Dios, meaning ‘Moving Towards God’; from the collection ‘D’Arienzo En El Corazón’ released in 2018, recorded by Pablo Ramos & Los Heredos in 2018; a tango with music composed by Eladio Blanco, lyrics by Raúl Hormaza, and sung by Pablo Ramos.  
  • De Igual A Igual, meaning ‘It’s All The Same’; from the collection ‘D’Arienzo En El Corazón’ released in 2018, recorded by Pablo Ramos & Los Heredos in 2018; a tango with music composed by Rodolfo Sciammarella, lyrics by Rodolfo Sciammarella, and sung by Pablo Ramos.