Tángalo

There’s a retrospective look at Sydney-based Tángalo, who brought a new level of tango bailable to Australasia with complex arrangements and outstanding musicianship. Continuing the dancability theme, Pugliese features, exploring his unusual distinction of being a major influence on the trajectory of both tango music and how tango is danced. And there’s a quick round-up of What’s On. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit:Ann Smith – Tángalo playing the Tango Social Club of Canberra milonga on 2 June 2018.

PLAYLIST:

  • Que No Sepan Las Estrellas, meaning ‘What The Stars Do Not Know’; recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 3 January 1945; a tango with music composed by José Ranieri, lyrics by Alfredo Faustino Roldán, and sung by Jorge Durán.  
  • Negracha; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 24 June 1948; a tango with music composed by Osvaldo Pugliese. The name is a reference to an Afro-Argentine woman.  
  • Recuerdo, meaning ‘Memory’; recorded by Julio De Caro on 9 December 1926; a tango with music composed by Osvaldo Pugliese in 1924 and lyrics by Eduardo Moreno.  
  • El Apronte, meaning ‘The Hope Chest’; recorded by Roberto Firpo in 1926; a tango with music composed by Roberto Firpo.  
  • Farol, meaning ‘Streetlamp’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 15 July 1943; a tango with music composed by Virgilio Expósito, lyrics by Homero Expósito, and sung by Robero Chanel. The lyrics sketch tango playing in suburbs lit by streetlights, referencing the Argentine nationalist poet Evaristo Carriego who’s poetry influenced many tango lyrics. 
  • La Yumba; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 21 August 1946; a tango with music composed by Osvaldo Pugliese. The name is a reference to the deep sound of tango arrastres.  
  • Remembranzas, meaning ‘Memories’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 4 July 1956; a tango with music composed by Mario Melfi, first recorded in 1934, lyrics by Mario Battistella, and sung by Jorge Maciel.  
  • Jacinto Chiclana, from the collection ‘Good Enough For Gringos’ released in 2013, recorded by Tángalo in 2013; a nuevo with music composed by Astor Piazzolla, first recorded in 1965, lyrics by Jorge Luís  Borges, and sung by Emily-Rose  Sárkova and Owen Salomé. The song title is a reference to the name of an imaginary street-wise porteño, a man of Buenos Aires. 
  • Carnaval De Mi Barrio, meaning ‘Festival Of My Suburb’; from the collection ‘Good Enough For Gringos’ released in 2013, recorded by Tángalo in 2013; a tango with music and lyrics composed by Luis Rubistein, first recorded in 1938, and sung by Susie Bishop.  
  • Poema, meaning ‘Poem’; from the collection ‘Good Enough For Gringos’ released in 2013, recorded by Tángalo in 2013; a tango with music composed by Mario Melfi in 1935, lyrics by Eduardo Bianco, and sung by Susie Bishop.  
  • Dos Corazones, meaning ‘Two Hearts’; from the collection ‘Good Enough For Gringos’ released in 2013, recorded by Tángalo in 2013; a tango with music composed by Francisco Canaro, first recorded in 1944, lyrics by Ivo Pelay, and sung by Susie Bishop and Emily-Rose Sárkova.  
  • De Antaño, meaning ‘Of  Times Gone By’; from the collection ‘Good Enough For Gringos’ released in 2013, recorded by Tángalo in 2013; a milonga with music and lyrics composed by Luis Rubistein, first recorded in 1939, and sung by Susie Bishop, Emily-Rose Sárkova, and Owen Salomé.  

Image Credit: Ann Smith – Tángalo playing the Tango Social Club of Canberra milonga on 2 June 2018.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s