Tango Noir

2019-04-04 - Tango Noir at the Paris Cat, MEl, 10 Nov 2018.jpg

Roberto is the least well-recognised of the singers named Díaz, but he was a seminal singer of the early years of tango and this edition features a brief review of his music. Then there is a round-up of What’s On before Ruth Roshan sings with Melbourne’s Tango Noir.   That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Tango Noir at the Paris Cat, 10 November 2018

PLAYLIST:

  • Viejo Coche, meaning ‘Old Coach’; recorded by Ángel D’Agostino on 7 April 1942; a tango with music composed by Eduardo Pereyra, first recorded in 1926, lyrics by Celedonio Flores, and sung by Ángel Vargas.
  • Casate Conmigo, meaning ‘Marry Me’; recorded by Osvaldo Fresedo on 22 March 1935; a tango sung by Roberto Díaz. The identities of the lyricist and the composer are lost.
  • Labios Vírgenes, meaning ‘Unkissed Lips’; recorded by Cayetano Puglisi on 9 October 1929; a tango sung by Roberto Díaz. The identities of the lyricist and the composer are lost.
  • Así Es El Mundo, meaning ‘It Is The World’; recorded by Francisco Canaro in 1926; a tango with music composed by Mario Canaro, lyrics by Juan Andrés Caruso, and sung by Roberto Díaz.
  • Agüelita, Qué Hora Son; recorded by Francisco Rotundo on 23 May 1949; a tango with music composed by Roberto Díaz, lyrics by Cayetano Oreste, and sung by Floreal Ruíz. The name is a reference to the passage of time through the metaphor of a beloved grandmother’s death.
  • Say What You Say; from the collection ‘Stories Of Love And Regret’ released in 2015, recorded by Tango Noir in 2015; with music composed by Ruth Roshan, lyrics by Ruth Roshan, and sung by Ruth Roshan.
  • Old Time Tango; from the collection ‘Darling, Keep It To Yourself’ released in 2011, recorded by Tango Noir in 2011; with music composed by Ruth Roshan.
  • Augmented; from the collection ‘Stories Of Love And Regret’ released in 2015, recorded by Tango Noir in 2015; with music composed by Ruth Roshan.
  • Darling, Keep It To Yourself; from the collection ‘Darling, Keep It To Yourself’ released in 2011, recorded by Tango Noir in 2011; with music composed by Ruth Roshan, lyrics by Ruth Roshan, and sung by Ruth Roshan.
  • Mosquetero De Arrabal, meaning ‘Musketeer Of The Suburbs’; a tango recorded by Roberto Firpo on 9 May 1932; with music composed by Armando Tagini, first recorded in 1930, and sung by Roberto Díaz.

Live Tango Music – your go-to site

2019-04-02 - Live Tango Music

Tango Capital has launched a new service, with the addition of a calendar of upcoming events featuring live tango music from around Australasia. Go to the blogsite –  Tango.Capital – and you will see events listed on the right.

And if you know of upcoming events not listed there, please be in touch – ann@tango.capital

Milonga Capital 2019 (I)

2019-03-26 - Pat Petronio DJs at Milonga Capital 2019

23 February saw Adelaide DJ Pat Petronio behind the deck at Milonga Capital 2019, and this week features the first hour of her exquisite playlist. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Pat Petronio at Milonga Capital 2019

PLAYLIST:

Tanda 1: Tangos from Juan D’Arienzo: Ataniche (1936), El Flete (1936), and ¡Qué Noche! (1937).

                  Cortina: Billie Holiday; Please Don’t Talk About Me When I’m Gone

Tanda 2: Tangos from Francisco Canaro (1938): Derecho Viejo, Loca, and Pura Parada.

                  Cortina: Ray Charles; Unchain My Heart

Tanda 3: Valses from Miguel Caló (1942): Alberto Podestá singing Bajo Un Cielo De Estrellas, Raúl Berón singing El Vals Soñador, and Alberto Podestá singing Pedacito De Cielo.

                  Cortina: Dave Brubeck; Take Five

Tanda 4: Tangos from Ricardo Tanturi with Alberto Castillo singing (1941): La Vida Es Corta, El Moro, and Pocas Palabras.

                  Cortina: Dusty Springfield; Son Of A Preacher Man

Tanda 5: Tangos from Carlos Di Sarli: Roberto Rufino singing Lo Pasao Pasó (1940), Patotero Sentimental (1941), and Griseta (1941), and Carlos Acuña singing Cuando El Amor Muere (1941).

                  Cortina: The Supremes; Where Did Our Love Go

Tanda 6: Milongas: an instrumental version of Milonga De Los Fortines from Orquesta Típica Victor (1937), Qué Tiempo Aquel from Francisco Lomuto with Jorge Omar singing (1938), and Sacale Punta from Edgardo Donato with Horacio Lagos and Randona singing (1938).

                  Cortina: The Audreys; Banjo And Violin

 

Tango For Dancing

2019-03-21 - TFD BWR 1

Tango Capital returns to play the fourth Sunday of the month broadcasting a milongita playlist for dancers . That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

PLAYLIST:

Tanda 1: Tangos from Pedro Laurenz (1952): an instrumental version of Quejas De Bandoneón, followed by Alfredo Del Rio singing Cuando Me Entrés A Fallar and La Gayola.

Tanda 2: Milongas from Osvaldo Fresedo: instrumental versions of La Trampera (1951), La Puñalada (1952), and De Pura Cepa (1953).

Tanda 3: Tangos from Robert Firpo and Cuarteto: La Trilla (1936), El Moro (1937), and Felicia (1937).

Tanda 4: Electronica: Paredón (Malevo,2007 ) and Tres Son Multitud (Narcotango, 2006).

Tanda 5: Tangos from Lucio Demare (1945): Igual Qué Un Bandoneón, the instrumental Florcita, and Nos Encontramos Al Pasar, with Horacio Quintana singing the first and third pieces.

Tanda 6: Valses from Ánibal Troilo (1942): Acordandome De Vos, an instrumental version of Un Placer, and Pedacito De Cielo, with Francisco Fiorentino singing the first and third pieces.

Tanda 7: Tangos from Ricardo Tanturi (1944): with Enrique Campos singing Si Se Salva El Pibe, Sombrerito, and Y…Siempre Igual.

 

Dancing Milonga

2019-03-17 - Myk Dowling - Milonga

This edition is all about milonga – the dance, the music – and Canberra tanguero Myk Dowling talks about dancing milonga.  That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

  • broadcasting on 2xxfm 98.3 in Canberra,
  • streaming live and also on demand and streaming live from http://www.2xxfm.org.au

Image: Myk Dowling, Milonga-ing one night in March 2018.

PLAYLIST:

  • La Mulateada, meaning ‘The Afro-Argentine Woman’; recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 20 November 1941; a milonga with music composed by Julio Eduardo Del Puerto, lyrics by Carlos Pesce, and sung by Roberto Rufino.
  • La Paloma (fragment), meaning ‘The Dove’;; a habanera.
  • No Hay Tierra Como La Mía, meaning ‘There Is No Land Like Mine’; recorded by Francisco Lomuto on 8 August 1939; a milonga with music composed by  Charlo in 1939, lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo, and sung by Fernando Díaz.
  • Milonga Sentimental, meaning ‘Sentimental Milonga’; recorded by Adolfo Carabelli on 30 December 1932; a milonga with music composed by Sebastián Piana in 1932, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Carlos Lafuente.
  • Milonguera, meaning ‘Tango Dancer’; recorded by Fabio Hager in 2011; a milonga with music composed by José Ogivieki and lyrics by Adela Balbín.
  • Azabache, meaning ‘Jet Black’; recorded by Miguel Caló on 29 September 1942; a candombe with music composed by Enrique Francini & Héctor Stamponi, lyrics by Homero Expósito, and sung by Raúl Berón.
  • Tango Negro, meaning ‘Black Tango’; recorded in 2001; a candombe with music composed by Juan Carlos Cáceres, lyrics by Juan Carlos Cáceres, and sung by Juan Carlos Cáceres.
  • De Pura Cepa, from lunfardo, meaning ‘Of Pure Stock’; recorded by Ánibal Troilo on 22 October 1942; a milonga with music composed by José Ceglie & Antonio Molina, first recorded in 1935 and lyrics by Osvaldo Sosa Cordero.
  • Reliquias Porteñas, meaning ‘Memories of Women of Buenos Aires’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 14 July 1938; a milonga with music composed by Graciano De Leone and lyrics by Celadonio Flores.
  • Amor Que Se Baila, meaning ‘Love To Dance’;, from the collection ‘Otros Aires’ released in 2012, recorded by Otros Aires in 2012; a milonga.
  • Maldonado; recorded  by Pedro Laurenz on 9 December 1943; a milonga with music composed by Alberto Mastra in 1943, lyrics by Alberto Mastra, and sung by Alberto Podestá. The name is a reference to the rivulet of that name that runs through Buenos Aires, and is now ‘entubed’ to run underground and so prevent flooding.

 

Roberto Maida

2019-03-08 - Roberto Maida

Last edition took a brief look at the short career of Roberto Maida, and this edition explores his legacy of recordings with Canaro in more detail. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

  • broadcasting on 2xxfm 98.3 in Canberra,
  • streaming live and also on demand and streaming live from http://www.2xxfm.org.au

Image Credit: http://www.todotango.com/creadores/ficha/515/Roberto-Maida

PLAYLIST:

  • Alma Del Bandoneón, meaning ‘Soul Of The Bandoneón’, and also known as ‘Alma De Bandoneón’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 20 March 1935; a tango with music composed by Enrique Santos Discépolo in 1935, lyrics by Luis César Amadori, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Noches De Buenos Aires, meaning ‘Nights Of Buenos Aires’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 23 April 1935; a tango with music composed by Alberto Soifer in 1935, lyrics by Manuel Romero, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Siempre Tuya Seré, meaning ‘I Will Always be Yours’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 18 July 1935; a vals sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Tú Y Yo, meaning ‘You And I’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 16 August 1935; a vals with music composed by Francisco Canaro, lyrics by Ivo Pelay, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Milonga Criolla, meaning ‘Hispanic Milonga’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 6 October 1936; a milonga with music composed by Alberto Soifer, lyrics by Manuel Romero, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Silueta Porteña, meaning ‘Silhouette Of A Woman Of Buenos Aires’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 17 January 1936; a milonga with music composed by Nicolas Luis Cuccaro and Juan Ventura Curraro in 1936, lyrics by Orlando D’Aniello and Ernesto Noli, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Mi Vida, meaning ‘My Life’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 3 June 1936; a vals with music composed by José Luís Padula, lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Secreto De Amor, meaning ‘Secret Of Love’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 18 March 1936; a vals with music composed by José Vázquez Vigo and Luís Gaulier in 1935, lyrics by Luís César Amadori, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Cariño Gaucho, meaning ‘Darling Gaucho’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 18 November 1936; a tango with music composed by Francisco Canaro and Lucio Demare, lyrics by Claudio Martínez Payva, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Condena, meaning ‘Condemnation’, and also known as ‘SOS’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 8 November 1937; a tango with music composed by Enrique Santos Discépolo and Francisco Pracánico in 1937, lyrics by Enrique Santos Discépolo, and sung by Roberto Maida. The name is a reference to a sentence for an illicit love – a love for an unsuspecting woman and her friendly husband. The alternative name is a cry for help in this intolerable situation.
  • Milonga De Antaño, meaning ‘Milonga Of Yore’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 19 August 1937; a milonga with music composed by Francisco Rofrano, lyrics by Elisardo Besada, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Milonga Triste, meaning ‘Sad Milonga’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 10 August 1937; a milonga with music composed by Sebastián Piana in 1929, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • El Triunfo De Tus Ojos, meaning ‘The Triumph Of Your Eyes’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 7 October 1938; a vals with music composed by Juan Canaro, lyrics by Juan Canaro, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Romántica, meaning ‘Romantic Woman’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 22 August 1938; a vals with music composed by Félix Lipesker, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Milonga Brava, meaning ‘Tough Milonga’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 20 June 1938; a milonga with music composed by Antonino Cipolla, lyrics by Celedonio Flores, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Milonga Del Corazón, meaning ‘Milonga Of The Heart’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 3 March 1938; a milonga with music composed by Miguel Busino, lyrics by Miguel Bucino, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Nada Más, meaning ‘Nothing More’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 22 August 1938; a tango with music composed by Juan D’Arienzo, lyrics by Luís Rubistein, and sung by Roberto Maida.

Entre Tango Duo

2019-02-28 - Entre Tangos CD.jpg

EntreTango Duo features the extraordinary voice of Elena Gonzalez backed by Elian Sellenes on piano, and this week introduces them by way of their recently released CD. And this week will also celebrate Roberto Maida, who was perhaps Canaro’s most iconic singer but before he joined Canaro at the age of 24 his CV already included Caló, the Malerba brothers, Fiorentino, Pizarro, Gardel, and regular jams with the Prince of Wales.

That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: The cover of  Entre Tangos, the new CD from Entre Tango Duo.

CORRECTION: A slip of the tongue last night – I said 4 but there are actually 5 milongas scheduled over the Melbourne Tango Weekend on 29-31 March.

PLAYLIST:

  • Chiqué, meaning ‘Fancy’, and also known as ‘El Elegante’; recorded by Ánibal Troilo on 3 March 1944; a tango composed in 1920 with music and lyrics by Ricardo Luis Brignolo.
  • Poema, meaning ‘Poem’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 11 June 1935; a tango with music composed by Mario Melfo in 1935, lyrics by Eduardo Bianco, and sung by Roberto Maida. That was of course the version played by request on 23 February at Milonga Capital 2019.
  • Te Odio, meaning ‘I Hate You’; recorded by Roberto Maida in 1930; a tango with music composed by Francisco Pracánico in 1929, lyrics by Celedonio Flores, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Yo Era Un Vovio Tranquilo, meaning ‘I Was An Easy Lover’; recorded by Alberto Castellanos in 1931; a tango with music composed by Roberto Maida, lyrics by Roberto Maida, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Mano A Mano, meaning ‘Hand To Hand’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 13 December 1938; a tango with music composed by Carlos  Gardel and José Razzano in 1923, lyrics by Celedonio Flores, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • En Voz Baja, meaning ‘In An Undertone’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 19 February 1937; a vals with music composed by Germán Rogelio Teisseire, lyrics by Diego Perkins, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Flor De Lino, meaning ‘Flax Flower’; from the collection ‘Entre Tangos’ released in 2018, recorded by Entre Tango Duo in 2018; a vals with music composed by Héctor Stamponi in 1947, lyrics by Homero Expósito, and sung by Elena Gonzalez.
  • Dejame Que Me Vaya, meaning ‘Let Me Go’;, from the collection ‘Entre Tangos’ released in 2018, recorded by Entre Tango Duo in 2018; a chacarera with music composed by Cuti Carabajal, lyrics by Roberto Teman, and sung by Elena Gonzalez.
  • Malena, from the collection ‘Entre Tangos’ released in 2018, recorded by Entre Tango Duo in 2018; a tango electronico with music composed by Lucio Demare in 1942, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Elena Gonzalez. The name is a reference to a nightclub singer of that name.
  • Balada Para Un Loco, meaning ‘Song For A Lunatic’; from the collection ‘Entre Tangos’ released in 2018, recorded by Entre Tango Duo in 2018; a tango electronico with music composed by Astor Piazzolla, first recorded in 1968, lyrics by Horacio Ferrer, and sung by Elena Gonzalez.
  • Caminito, meaning ‘The Little Pathway’; from the collection ‘Entre Tangos’ released in 2018, recorded by Entre Tango Duo in 2018; a tango electronico with music composed by Juan de Dios Filiberto in 1926, and sung by Elena Gonzalez.
  • El Llorón, meaning ‘The Weeper’; recorded by Hugo Díaz in 1972; a milonga with music composed by Juan Félix Maglio in 1933 and lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo.