The Tango Decades: 1935-1939

2019-11-14 - The Tango Decades 1935-1939

Bringing a different perspective to the music of tango, The Tango Decades is an 8-part series focusing on a horizontal slice of what was hot, decade by decade, as tango blossomed over 40 years. This third episode reviews the transitional period 1935-1939 as the Guardia Nueva segued to the Golden Age of tango for dancing.  That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Carlos Gardel sings and dances in ‘Tango Bar’, in one of his last appearances before dying in a plane crash in June 1935. The film was funded by Paramount and the technical quality was much greater than in the early years of tango cinematography—an indicator of the wider success that tango music was achieving as it rode on the back of the growing maturity and penetration of audio technologies in radio, recording, and film. It was at the same time that D’Arienzo capitalised on this success of tango music by adapting some of the earlier, simpler characteristics of tango to reframe tango for dancing.

PLAYLIST:

2019-11-17 - Playlist

 

The Tango Decades: 1930-1934

2019-11-07 - The Tango Decades 1930-34

Bringing a different perspective to the music of tango, The Tango Decades is an 8-part series focusing on a horizontal slice of what was hot, decade by decade, as tango blossomed over 40 years. This week explores some of the factors that came together in the years 1930-1934 to set the scene for the perfect storm that tango became .…… That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: In 1933 a very young (19 years old) Ánibal Troilo was one of the musicians in the Argentine film, ‘Los Tres Berretines’, only the second Argentine film using the Movietone system for improved sound quality. Tango dance and lifestyle was incorporated into Argentine cinema from 1928, with the silent ‘film Alma En Pena’ named for that tango. The first Argentine film with sound was ‘Adiós Argentina’;  made in 1930, it starred the tango singer Libertad Lamarque. ‘Tango!’ was released with the Movietone sound system in 1933; offering good quality music and properly synchronised dialogue as well as the spectacle of tango dancing, from this point onwards in Argentina the trajectories of tango and cinema were intertwined.

PLAYLIST:

2019-11-10 - Playlist

The Tango Decades: 1925-1929

2019-10-31 - The Tango Decades - 1925-1929

Bringing a different perspective to the music of tango, The Tango Decades is an 8-part series focusing on a horizontal slice of what was hot, decade by decade, as tango blossomed over 40 years. This week starts with the earliest music generally played for dancing today, music from 1925-1929.…… That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit: Hood Collection Part II, Call No: PXE 789 (v.57), IE No. IE1007570, File No. FL1008153, File Title: 46. Twenties tango, State Library of New South Wales. A couple dance tango in a style heavily influenced by the early form of tango known as canyengue; this is almost certainly a publicity shot for a theatre production in Sydney in the 1920s.

PLAYLIST:

2019-11-03 - Playlist

 

Erika Mordek, DJ

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This edition introduces Canberran tango teacher Erika Mordek and her views on DJing tango music in both teaching and milonga contexts. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit: Peter Dall; Erika Mordek teaching at the National Folk Festival 2016

PLAYLIST:

  • Ella Es Así, meaning ‘She Is Like That’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 10 October 1938; a milonga with music composed by Luis Martino, lyrics by Manuel Carretero, and sung by Horacio Lagos.
  • Soñar Y Nada Más, meaning ‘To Dream And Nothing More’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 5 May 1943; a vals with music composed by Francisco Canaro, lyrics by Ivo Pelay, and sung by Carlos Roldán and Eduardo Adrián.
  • Cacareando, meaning ‘Bragging’; recorded by Orquesta Típica Victor on 14 July 1933; a milonga with music composed by Antonio Sureda, lyrics by Gerónimo Sureda, and sung by Carlos Lafuente.
  • Yo Tengo Una Novia, meaning ‘I Have A Girlfriend’; recorded by Ángel D’Agostino on 17 November 1942; a vals with music composed by Rosendo Pesoa and Diego Centeno, lyrics by Héctor Marcó, and sung by Ángel Vargas.
  • Amor Y Celos, meaning ‘Love And Jealousy’, and also known as ‘Amor Y Celo’; recorded by Juan D’Arienzo on 3 September 1936; a vals with music composed by Miguel Padula, first recorded in 1928 and lyrics by Alfredo Faustino Roldán.
  • Esquinas Porteñas, meaning ‘Street Corners Of Buenos Aires’; recorded by Ángel D’Agostino on 22 May 1942; a vals with music composed by Sebastián Piana, first recorded in 1932, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Ángel Vargas.
  • Milonga Criolla, meaning ‘Milonga Of Argentina’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 6 October 1936; a milonga with music composed by Alberto Soifer, lyrics by Manuel Romero, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • Milonga De Mis Amores, meaning ‘Milonga Of My Loves’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 26 May 1937; a milonga with music composed by Pedro Laurenz in 1937 and lyrics by José María Contursi.
  • Silueta Porteña, meaning ‘Shadow Of A Woman Of Buenos Aires’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 17 July 1936; a milonga with music composed by Nicolas Luis Cuccaro and Juan Ventura Cuccaro in 1936, lyrics by Orlando D’Aniello and Ernesto Noli, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • El Llorón, meaning ‘The One Who Weeps’; recorded by Hugo Díaz in 1972; a milonga with music composed by Juan Félix Maglio in 1933 and lyrics by Enrique Cadícomo.