Ernesto Famá: a decade with some of the great orquestas

 

2017-09-04 - Ernesto Fama with Francisco Canaro

After checking out Di Sarli with Jorge Durán over the previous couple of weeks, last week introduced the voice of Ernesto Famá singing with Di Sarli , and this week further features the singing of Famá with a variety of orquesta.

That’s Tango Capital, Sunday evening from 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit: http://www.totango.net/Canaro.html

PLAYLIST:

  • Esta Noche Me Emborracho, meaning ‘Tonight I Will Get Drunk’;  a tango recorded by Osvaldo Fresedo; on 3 May 1928 music and lyrics by Enrique Santos Discépolo in 1928 and sung by  Ernesto Famá.
  • Alma En Pena, meaning ‘Soul In Pain’; a tango recorded by Osvaldo Fresedo; on 9 October 1928 with music composed by Anselmo A Aieta in 1928 lyrics by Francisco García Jiménez and sung by  Ernesto Famá.
  • El Barrio Murmura, meaning ‘The Whispering Suburb’; a tango recorded by Osvaldo Fresedo; on 28 February 1928 sung by  Ernesto Famá.
  • El Flete, meaning ‘The Racehorce’;  a tango recorded by Orquesta Típica Porteño; on 16 September 1930 with music composed by Vicente Greco in 1916 lyrics by Gerónimo Gerito  and sung by  Ernesto Famá.
  • Carillon De La Merced, meaning ‘Bells Of Favour’ or ‘Bells of Mercy’, the name a reference to a reference to church bells; a tango recorded by Orquesta Típica Victor; on 9 June 1931 with music composed by Enrique Santos Discépolo in 1931 lyrics by Enrique Santos Discépolo and Alfredo La Pera  and sung by  Ernesto Famá.
  • Santa Paula, meaning ‘Saint Paula’; a tango recorded by Juan Canaro; on 5 October 1931 with music composed by Juan Canaro lyrics by Osvaldo Sosa Cordero and sung by  Ernesto Famá.
  • La Baguala, the name a reference to an Argentine folksong genre; a tango recorded by Carlos Di Sarli Sexteto; on 23 June 1931 with music composed by Juan Andrés Pérez lyrics by Enrique Carrera Sotelo and sung by  Ernesto Famá.
  • Sobre El Pucho, meaning ‘Right Away’, or ‘On The Spot’, or ‘There and Then’, and also known as ‘Un Callejón en Pompeya’; a tango recorded by Carlos Di Sarli Sexteto; on 3 June 1931 with music composed by Sebastián Piana in 1922 lyrics by José Gonzáles Castillo (Juan de León) and sung by  Ernesto Famá.
  • Maldita, meaning ‘Mean Woman’; a tango recorded by Carlos Di Sarli Sexteto; on 14 August 1931 with music composed by Antonio Rodio lyrics by Celedonio Flores and sung by  Ernesto Famá.
  • Quisiera Amarte Menos, meaning ‘I Would Like To Love You Less’; a vals recorded by Francisco Canaro; on 11 December 1933 with music composed by Francisco Canaro in 1933 lyrics by Luis César Amadori and sung by  Ernesto Famá.
  • Adiós Juventud, meaning ‘Good-bye Youth’; a vals recorded by Francisco Canaro; on 21 April 1933 with music composed by Antonio Sureda lyrics by Gerónimo Sureda and sung by  Ernesto Famá.
  • La Cancion De Amalia, meaning ‘Song of Amalia’; a vals recorded by Francisco Canaro; on 24 August 1933 with music composed by Enrique Maciel lyrics by Héctor Pedro Blomberg and sung by  Ernesto Famá.
  • Por Vos Yo Me Rompo, meaning ‘For You I Bother’ (from lunfardo); a tango recorded by Francisco Canaro; on 27 February 1939 music and lyrics by Francisco Canaro and sung by  Ernesto Famá.
  • Mala Suerte, meaning ‘Bad Luck’; a tango recorded by Francisco Canaro; on 27 February 1939 with music composed by Francisco Lomuto in 1939 lyrics by Francisco Gorrindo and sung by  Ernesto Famá.
  • Tormenta, meaning ‘Storm’; a tango recorded by Francisco Canaro; on 28 March 1939 music and lyrics by Enrique Santos Discépolo in 1939 and sung by  Ernesto Famá.
  • No Hay Tierra Como La Mia, meaning ‘There Is No Land Like Mine’; a milonga recorded by Francisco Canaro; on 2 November 1939 with music composed by Charlo in 1939 lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo and sung by  Ernesto Famá.
  • La Milonga De Buenos Aires, meaning ‘The Milonga of Buenos Aires’; a milonga recorded by Francisco Canaro; on 9 October 1939 with music composed by Francisco Canaro lyrics by Ivo Pelay and sung by  Ernesto Famá.
  • Parque Patricios, meaning ‘Park of the Patricians’, the name a reference to the suburb on the south side of Buenos Aires, that includes several parks including a large park of the same name; a milonga recorded by Francisco Canaro; on 3 October 1940 with music composed by Antonio Radicci lyrics by Francisco Laino  and sung by  Ernesto Famá.

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