David Storm – photographer

2017-12-07 - David Storm - photographer

An interview with photographer David Storm commences exploring his perspectives on photographing tango dancing, then there is a quick look at Tangalo‘s music at BASH 2017, and the compositions of Juan Carlos Cobian will feature. That’s Tango Capital, Sunday evening from 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: David Storm with me at BASH 2016.

 

 

PLAYLIST:

  • Mi Refugio, meaning ‘My Shelter’; a tango recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 18 April 1941, first recorded in 1922, with music composed by Juan Carlos Cobián and lyrics by Pedro Numa Córdoba.
  • El Aristócrata (also known as Shusheta), meaning ‘The Aristocrat’; a tango recorded by Ángel D’Agostino on 5 April 1945 with music composed by Juan Carlos Cobián in 1920, lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo, and sung by Ángel Vargas.
  • Una Droga, meaning ‘A Drug’; a tango composed and then recorded by Juan Carlos Cobián on 6 February 1923.
  • Nostalgias, meaning ‘Wistful Memories’; a tango recorded by Miguel Caló on 9 August 1948, with music composed by Juan Carlos Cobián in 1936, lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo, and sung by Roberto Arrieta.
  • Carnaval De Mi Barrio, meaning ‘Carnival Of My Suburb’; a tango recorded by Tángalo in 2013 on the Good Enough For Gringos release; first recorded in 1938 with music and lyrics by Luis Rubistein, and sung by Susie Bishop.
  • Poema, meaning ‘Poem’; a tango recorded by Tángalo in 2013 on the Good Enough For Gringos release; with music composed by Mario Melfi in 1935, lyrics by Eduardo Bianci, and sung by Susie Bishop.
  • Corazon, meaning ‘Heart’; a tango recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 11 December 1939, with music composed by Carlos Di Sarli in 1939, lyrics by Héctor Marcó, and sung by Roberto Rufino.
  • La Mulateada, meaning ‘Mulatto Woman’; a milonga recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 20 November 1941, with music composed by Julio Eduardo Del Puerto, lyrics by Carlos Pesce, and sung by Roberto Rufino.
  • Cascabelito, meaning ‘Little Bell’, the name a reference to a woman with a tinkling laugh; a tango recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 6 June 1941, with music composed by José Bohr in 1924, lyrics by Juan Andrés Caruso, and sung by Roberto Rufino.

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