Troilo-Fiorentino

Last edition celebrated Anibal Troilo’s recording career, which started with his successful collaboration with Francisco Fiorentino, so this edition  takes a chronological dive through their music together.

2018-03-08 - Troilo & Fiorentino.jpg

That’s Tango Capital this Sunday evening from 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit: http://www.tangology101.com/main.cfm/title/Tanda-of-the-Week-59—Anibal-Troilo-with-Francisco-Fiorentino/id/1229

PLAYLIST:

  • En Esta Tarde Gris, meaning ‘On This Grey Afternoon’; recorded by Aníbal Troilo on 18 July 1941; a tango with music composed by Mariano Mores in 1941, lyrics by José María Contursi, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino.
  • Tabernero, meaning ‘Publican’; recorded by Aníbal Troilo on 28 May 1941; a tango with music composed by Miguel Cafre and Fausto Frontera, first recorded in 1927, lyrics by Raúl Costa Oliveri, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino.
  • Sencillo Y Compadre, meaning ‘Straightforward And Gaucho’; recorded by Aníbal Troilo on 21 November 1941; a tango with music composed by Juan José Guichandut, lyrics by Carlos Bahr, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino. The name is a reference to the mythologised gaucho .
  • Con Toda La Voz Que Tengo, meaning ‘With All The Voice I Have’; recorded by Aníbal Troilo on 16 April 1941; a milonga with music composed by Aníbal Troilo, lyrics by Enrique Dizeo, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino.
  • Ficha De Oro, meaning ‘Token Of Gold’; recorded by Aníbal Troilo on 9 October 1942; a milonga with music composed by Carmelo Di Napoli, lyrics by Enrique Dizeo, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino.
  • El Desafío, meaning ‘The Challenge’; recorded by Aníbal Troilo on 30 March 1944; a milonga with music composed by René Ruiz, lyrics by Gualberto Márquez, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino.
  • Pa’ Que Bailen Los Muchachos, meaning ‘For The Lads That Dance’; recorded by Aníbal Troilo on 16 April 1942; a tango with music composed by Aníbal Troilo, lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino.
  • Por Las Calles De La Vida, meaning ‘Through the Streets Of My Life’; recorded by Aníbal Troilo on 14 December 1942; a tango with music and lyrics composed by Enrique Cadícamo, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino.
  • Soy Muchacho De La Guardia, meaning ‘I Am A Lad Of The Guard’; recorded by Aníbal Troilo on 15 June 1942; a tango with music composed by Agustín Irusta, lyrics by Héctor Marcó, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino. The name is a reference to the Guardia Vieja and the street origins of tango.
  • Tu Diagnóstico, meaning ‘Your Diagnosis’; recorded by Aníbal Troilo on 9 October 1941; a vals with music and lyrics composed by José Betinotti, first recorded in 1921, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino.
  • Valsecito Amigo, meaning ‘Vals Friend’; recorded by Aníbal Troilo on 25 March 1943; a vals with music composed by Aníbal Troilo, lyrics by José María Contursi, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino.
  • Temblando, meaning ‘Shaking’; recorded by Aníbal Troilo on 30 March 1944; a vals with music composed by Alberto Hilarion Acuña, first recorded in 1933, lyrics by Gualberto Márquez, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino.
  • A Bailar, meaning ‘To Dance’; recorded by Aníbal Troilo on 5 November 1943; a tango with music composed by Domingo Federico, lyrics by Homero Expósito, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino.
  • Cada Vez Que Me Recuerdes, meaning ‘Every Time You Remember Me’; recorded by Aníbal Troilo on 5 April 1943; a tango with music composed by Mariano Mores, lyrics by José María Contursi, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino.
  • Corazón, No Le Hagas Caso, meaning ‘Heart, Don’t Take Notice’; recorded by Aníbal Troilo on 11 March 1943; a tango with music composed by Armando Pontier in 1942, lyrics by Carlos Bahr, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino.
  • No Te Apures, Cara Blanco, meaning ‘Do Not Worry, White Face’; recorded by Aníbal Troilo on 18 September 1942; a tango with music composed by Roberto Garza in 1942, lyrics by Carlos Bahr, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino.
  • Cada Día Te Extraño Más, meaning ‘Every Day I Miss You More’; recorded by Aníbal Troilo on 17 December 1943; a tango with music composed by Armando Pontier in 1943, lyrics by Carlos Bahr, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino.
  • Tabaco, meaning ‘Tobacco’; recorded by Aníbal Troilo on 30 March 1944; a tango with music composed by Armando Pontier, lyrics by José María Contursi, and sung by Francisco Fiorentino.
  • Bien Porteño, meaning ‘Good Man of Buenos Aires’; recorded by Aníbal Troilo on 30 March 1944; a tango with music and lyrics composed by Gregorio Surif and Alberto Augusto Barbera.

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