Vals

2018-06-02 - Desde El Alma - Detail

There are all sorts of views on the role of vals in tango. Waltz was the scandalous dance of the early 19th century that slipped quietly into respectability after a couple of generations, so much so that a 14 year old girl could write the most popular vals of all time – Desde El Alma. Musicians say when the equally scandalous tango developed in Buenos Aires, vals was played by tango bands as a smokescreen when the moral police came around. This all meant that there was an early tradition of vals, and so when D’Arienzo re-invigorated tango music generally in 1935, he made the infectiously danceable vals part of the package – leading to an explosion of valses from many different orquestas over the following decade. This week features valses from a series of orquestas  exploring how vals evolved from the very late 1920s onwards. That’s Tango Capital this Sunday evening from 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: http://www.todotango.com/historias/cronica/183/Desde-el-alma-Desde-el-alma-un-vals-criollo-y-romantico/

PLAYLIST:

  •  Amor Y Celos, meaning ‘Love And Passion’; recorded by Francisco Lomuto on 30 September 1930; a vals with music composed by Miguel Padula, first recorded in 1928, and lyrics by Alfredo Faustino Roldán.
  • A Su Memoria, meaning ‘To Your Memory’; recorded by Francisco Lomuto on 1 October 1931; a vals with music composed by Antonio Sureda, first recorded in 1927, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Anselmo Hilarion Acuña and Fernando Diaz.
  • Muy Lindo, meaning ‘Very Beautiful’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 3 December 1938; a vals with music composed by Émile Charles Waldteufel, first recorded in 1932. Also known as Très Jolie.
  • Francia, meaning ‘France’; recorded by Francisco Cana on 7 June 1943; a vals with music composed by Octavio Barbero, first recorded in 1935 and lyrics by Carlos Pesce. It’s from Canaro’s Pirincho Quintet.
  • Salud, Dinero, Y Amor, meaning ‘Health, Money, and Love’; recorded by Enrique Rodriquéz on 25 July 1939; a vals with music and lyrics composed by Rodolfo Sciammarella, and sung by Roberto Flores.
  • Tengo Mil Novias, meaning ‘I Have A Thousand Girlfriends’; recorded by Enrique Rodriquéz on 10 October 1939; a vals with music composed by Enrique Rodriguéz, lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo, and sung by Roberto Flores.
  • Ribereña, meaning ‘Riverbank’; recorded by Lucio Demare on 13 March 1942; a vals with music composed by Victor Braña and Santiago Coppola, lyrics by Enrique Miguel Gaudino, and sung by Juan Carlos Miranda.
  • Entrelazando Los Corazones, meaning ‘The Hearts Entwining’; recorded by Lucio Demare in 1944; a vals with music and lyrics composed by Georgina Vargas, and sung by Horacio Quintana.
  • Pájaro Herido, meaning ‘Wounded Bird’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 7 October 1941; a vals with music composed by Esteban A Parma and Amadeo Faffo and lyrics by Guillermo Naccarelle.
  • Amor Y Vals, meaning ‘Love And Waltz’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 22 May 1942; a vals with music composed by Rodolfo Biagi, lyrics by Carlos Bahr, and sung by Alberto Lago.
  • Flor De Lino, meaning ‘Flower Of Flax’; recorded by Miguel Caló on 3 Devember 1946; a vals with music composed by Héctor Stamponi, lyrics by Homero Expósito, and sung by Raúl Iriate.
  • Manos Adoradas, meaning ‘Adorable Hands’; recorded by Miguel Caló on 3 October 1952; a vals with music composed by Roberto Rufio, first recorded in 1951, lyrics by Horacio Sanguinetti, and sung by Juan Carlos Fabri.
  • Mascarita, meaning ‘Little Mask’; recorded by Pedro Laurenz on 21 February 1940; a vals with music composed by Pedro Laurenz, lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo, and sung by Alberto Podestá.
  • Paisaje, meaning ‘Landscape’; recorded by Pedro Laurenz on 6 August 1943; a vals with music composed by Sebastián Piana, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Juan Carlos Casas.
  • A Mi Madre, meaning ‘To My Mother’; recorded by Francini-Pontier on 10 May 1948; a vals with music and lyrics composed by Francisco Peña, first recorded in 1928, and sung by Roberto Rufino.
  • Las Rosas De Mi Madre, meaning ‘The Roses Of My Mother’; recorded by Francini-Pontier on 19 January 1956; a vals with music composed by Enrique Francini, first recorded in 1956, lyrics by María Ester M. de Carnevale, and sung by Alberto Podestá.
  • Ilusión Marina, meaning ‘Sea Dream’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 28 January 1947; a vals with music composed by Antonio Sureda, first recorded in 1930, lyrics by Gerónimo Sureda, and sung by Alberto Morán.
  • Dos Que Se Aman, meaning ‘Two That Love Each Other’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 15 September 1948; a vals with music composed by Antonio Torno, lyrics by Manuel Maria Flores, and sung by Alberto Morán.

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