Ritmos de Folklórico

2018-06-21 - Folklorico in Bahia Blanca.jpg

Next episode is the first of a two-part speacial on the considerable legacy from Argentine tango orquestas of  music that is not tango. Canaro recorded more paso dobles and foxtrots each than he did milongas; Rogdriguez worked under the tagline of “La orquesta de todos los ritmos, ‘The orquesta of all the rhythms'” and featured jazz in his playlists; orquestas ranging from De Caro to Firpo to Lomuto, featured and recorded an array of folk rhythms including polca and ranchera, gato, and zamba; this is a selection of those traditional folk rhythms of Argentina as interpreted by some of the great tango musicians. That’s Tango Capital:

Image: Folklórico in Bahia Blanca, April 2012

PLAYLIST: 

  • Las Promesas En Amor, meaning ‘The Promises In Love’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 13 October 1939; a ranchera with music composed by Francisco Canaro, lyrics by Ivo Pelay, and sung by Francisco Amor.
  • Maté Cocido, meaning ‘Hot Maté’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 30 March 1939; a ranchera with music composed by Enrique N García, lyrics by Lito Bayardo, and sung by Francisco Amor. The name is a reference to yerba maté, the South America tea made from a holly bush that is steeped in a gourd and takes the place of hot coffee for many Argentinians.
  • ?Dónde Hay El Novio¿, meaning ‘Where Is The Boyfriend?’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 13 October 1939; a ranchera with music composed by Francisco Canaro, lyrics by Ivo Pelay, and sung by Ernesto Famá.
  • El Viejito Del Acordeón, meaning ‘The Little Old Man With The Accordion’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 12 May 1936; a polca with music and lyrics composed by José Domingo Aiello and Carmelo Aiello, and sung by Roberto Maida and Ángel Ramos.
  • La Refalosa; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 18 June 1935; a polca with music composed by Francisco Canaro, first recorded in 1928. The name is a reference to another traditional dance, the refalosa or resbalosa, this one based on the cueca and featuring a handkerchief; it was popular in Argentina in the first half of the 19th century and survived in the provinces.
  • Maté Amargo, meaning ‘Bitter Maté’; recorded by Rafael Rossi; a ranchera with music composed by Carlos F Bravo, first recorded in 1928, lyrics by Francisco Brancatti, and sung by Casadei brothers. The name is a reference to yerba maté, the South America tea made from a holly bush that was traditionally drunk without sugar or other flavourings.
  • Enamorado, meaning ‘In Love’; recorded by Pedro Laurenz in 1937; a ranchera with music composed by Pedro Laurenz, and sung by Héctor Farrel.
  • Patria Hermana , meaning ‘Sister Of The Fatherland’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 11 September 1939; a marcha with music composed by Francisco Canaro, lyrics by Ivo Pelay, and sung by Ernesto Famá and Francisco Amor.
  • Puerto Nuevo, meaning ‘New Port’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 18 March 1936; a marcha with music composed by Hans Diernhammer, first recorded in 1935, lyrics by Luis César Amadori, and sung by Roberto Maida. The name is a reference to the major works to move the docking facilities from various sites including La Boca to the current location north of Retiro. The works commenced in 1911 and when completed in 1928 the port was the largest in the Southern Hemisphere.
  • El 180; recorded by Julia Vidal in 1952; a gato with music composed by Alberto Acuña, Andres Chazzareta, and Rene Ruiz, and sung by Julia Vidal.
  • El Sol Del 25, meaning ‘The Sun Of 25’; recorded by Francisco Lomuto on 9 May 1939; a gato with music composed by Carlos Gardel and José Razzano, first recorded in 1917, lyrics by Domingo V Lombardi, and sung by Fernando Díaz and Jorge Omar. The name is a reference to the sun of the Argentine flag rising over the Rio De La Plata in a military context; in 1825 the United Kingdom recognised Argentinian independence, and the war that led to the secession of Uruguay commenced. This was a very popular song that year; Francisco Canaro also recorded it just a fortnight later, on 22 May 1939.
  • La Tia Renuncia; recorded by Elba Berón in 1956 with guest artist Francisco Tropoli on piano; a chamamé with music composed by Juan Carlos Mareco, lyrics by José Maria Pilepich, and sung by Elba Berón.
  • El Niño De Las Monjas, meaning ‘The Child of The Nuns’; recorded by Rafael Rossi; a pasodoble sung by Casadei brothers.
  • Paquiya; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 17 July 1936; a pasodoble with music and lyrics composed by Héctor Lomuto, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • A La Huaca China; meaning ‘To The Inca Woman’, recorded by Francisco Canaro on 27 February 1939; a pasodoble with music composed by Francisco Pérez Anampa, first recorded in 1938, lyrics by Carlos Saco Herrera, and sung by Francisco Amor. The name is not a reference to the famous oasis of Huacachina in the Peruvian desert sands; here the term “Huaca” refers to the beliefs and ideology of the Inca people who controlled the Andes in the west of Argentina, whilst “China” refers to an indigenous woman.
  • Mariana; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 4 May 1939; a pasodoble with music and lyrics composed by Alejandro Gutiérrez Del Barrio, and sung by Ernesto Famá. The name is a reference to a woman’s name.
  • Argentina, meaning ‘Argentina’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 8 November 1937; a ranchera with music and lyrics composed by Héctor Lomuto, and sung by Roberto Maida.

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