Roberto Rufino – the singing

2019-01-10 - roberto rufino

Last edition explored the location of Roberto Rufino at the intersection of many of the influences that shaped modern tango. This edition explores his musical legacy in more detail. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit: https://tango.info/RoberRufin

PLAYLIST:

  • Los Muñequitos, meaning ‘The Dolls’, and also known as ‘San Fernando’; recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 4 November 1943; a tango with music composed by Francisco Pracánico, lyrics by Oscar Rubens, and sung by Roberto Rufino.
  • Esta Noche De Luna, meaning ‘This Night Of The Moon’; recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 17 December 1943; a tango with music composed by Graciano Gómez and José García, lyrics by Héctor Marcó, and sung by Roberto Rufino.
  • Tristeza Marina, meaning ‘Sadness Of The Sea’; recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 7 September 1943; a tango with music composed by José Dames and Roberto Flores in 1943, lyrics by Horacio Sanguinetti, and sung by Roberto Rufino.
  • Verdemar, meaning ‘Sea-Green’; recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 7 October 1943; a tango with music composed by Carlos Di Sarli in 1943, lyrics by José María Contursi, and sung by Roberto Rufino. The name is a reference to a dead lover, a woman with sea-green eyes.
  • A Mi Madre, meaning ‘To My Mother’; recorded by Francini-Pontier on 10 May 1948; a vals with music and lyrics composed by Francisco Peña, first recorded in 1928, and sung by Roberto Rufino.
  • A Su Memoria, meaning ‘To Your Memory’; recorded by Francini-Pontier on 5 March 1947; a vals with music composed by Antonio Sureda, first recorded in 1927, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Roberto Rufino.
  • El Bazar De Los Juguetes, meaning ‘The Market Of Toys’; recorded by Miguel Caló on 5 May 1954; a tango with music composed by Roberto Rufino and Alberto Podestá, first recorded in 1941, lyrics by Reinaldo Yiso, and sung by Alberto Podestá.
  • Calla, meaning ‘Be Quiet’; recorded by Alfredo Gobbi on 18 September 1956; a tango with music composed by Roberto Rufino in 1955, lyrics by Manuel Barros, and sung by Tito Landó.
  • Cómo Nos Cambia La Vida, meaning ‘How Life Changes Us’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 6 May 1953; a tango with music composed by Roberto Rufino in 1942, lyrics by Elizardo Martínez Vilas, and sung by Oscar Larroca.
  • Eras Como La Flor, meaning ‘You Were Like The Flower’; recorded by Juan D’Arienzo on 22 December 1955; a tango with music composed by Roberto Rufino in 1955, lyrics by Mario César Arrieta, and sung by Armando Laborde.
  • Destino De Flor, meaning ‘Destiny Of A Flower’; recorded by Juan D’Arienzo on 29 June 1957; a tango with music composed by Roberto Rufino, lyrics by Alejandro Romay, and sung by Jorge Valdez.
  • Pena Mulata, meaning ‘Sad Woman Of Colour’; recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 18 February 1941; a tango with music composed by Sebastián Piana in 1941, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Roberto Rufino.
  • La Mulateada, meaning ‘The Woman Of Colour’; recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 20 November 1941; a milonga with music composed by Julio Eduardo Del Puerto, lyrics by Carlos Pesce, and sung by Roberto Rufino.
  • Los Despojos, meaning ‘The Remains’; recorded by Francini-Pontier on 11 June 1947; a milonga with music composed by José Dames, lyrics by Horacio Sanguinetti, and sung by Roberto Rufino.
  • Nunca Tuvo Novio, meaning ‘Never Had A Boyfriend’, and also known as ‘La que nunca tuvo novio, Pobre solterona’; recorded by Francini-Pontier on 29 September 1947; a tango with music composed by Agustín Bardi in 1924, lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo, and sung by Roberto Rufino.
  • Claveles Blancos, meaning ‘White Carnations’; recorded by Francini-Pontier on 3 February 1949; a tango with music composed by Armando Pontier, lyrics by José María Contursi, and sung by Roberto Rufino.
  • Canción Para Un Breve Final, meaning ‘Song For A Short Finish’; recorded by Francini-Pontier on 4 February 1948; a tango with music composed by Armando Pontier, lyrics by Homero Expósito, and sung by Roberto Rufino.

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