Vicente Greco – the music

2019-02-07 - Vicente Greco y su Orquesta Tipica Criolla

Last edition identified the pivotal importance of Greco’s compositions as a leading figure in the Guardia Vieja, as tango transitioned from traditional to modern tango, and this edition explores his musical legacy in more detail. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: The first orquesta típica criolla was Greco’s quintet; this image is from between 1911 and 1914. In the middle at the back is the flautist, Vicente Pecci, whose son followed him into tango. Seated in the middle without an instrument is Domingo Greco, Vicente’s elder brother, who played guitar and piano; the fact that he is not holding a guitar suggests that this photo was taken later rather than earlier – around 1913 or 1914. The two bandoneonistas are, on the right, Lorenzo Labissier, so respected by his peers that not 1 but 2 tangos were dedicated to him—El Chamuyo, by Canaro, and Lorenzo, by Agustín Bardi; on the left is of course, Vicente Greco. The image is flanked by two violinists, but only one played with the orquesta at a time; on the right is José Abbati, who went on to play with Pedro Maffia; on the left is a very young Francisco Canaro, who went on to become…Canaro! 

PLAYLIST:

  • Qué Nene, meaning ‘What A Baby’; recorded by Juan Félix Maglio in 1912; a tango with music composed by Vicente Greco and lyrics by Ernesto Temes.
  • Criollo Viejo, meaning ‘Old Argentinian’; recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 8 May 1930; a tango with music composed by Vicente Greco, first recorded in 1926 and lyrics by Ernesto Temes.
  • El Flete, from lunfardo, meaning ‘The Light Horse’; recorded by Orquesta Típica Porteña  on 16 September 1930; a tango with music composed by Vicente Greco in 1916, lyrics by Gerónimo Gradito, and sung by Ernesto Famá. The name is a reference to the Spanish nautical charge for freighting ‘supercargo’, ie, passengers..
  • Estoy Penando, meaning ‘I Am Hurting’; recorded by Orquesta Típica Brunswick ? in 1931; a tango with music composed by Vicente Greco, first recorded in 1914 and lyrics by Ernesto Temes.
  • El Pibe, from lunfardo, meaning ‘The Lad’; recorded by Orquesta Típica Victor on 6 September 1933; a tango with music composed by Vicente Greco, first recorded in 1912 and lyrics by Ernesto Temes. The name is a reference to Prudencio Aragón, the pianist that Greco met in his early years playing in and around Rosario, and who became a lifelong colleague.
  • El Estribo, meaning ‘For The Road’; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 12 April 1940; a tango with music composed by Vicente Greco, first recorded in 1924 or earlier and lyrics by Ernesto Temes. The name is a reference to the nightclub of that name in Buenos Aires at which tango was played.
  • El Morochito, meaning ‘The Dark-haired Lad’; recorded by Enrique Rodríguez on 19 December 1941; a tango with music composed by Vicente Greco, first recorded in 1912 and lyrics by Gerónimo Gradito.
  • Racing Club, meaning ‘Racing Club’; recorded by Ángel D’Agostino on 29 March 1946; a tango with music composed by Vicente Greco in 1916 and lyrics by Ernesto Temes.
  • La Viruta, from lunfardo; recorded by Alfredo J Gobbi on 16 Mary 1947; a tango with music composed by Vicente Greco in 1912 and lyrics by Ernesto Temes. The name is a reference to the strong emotions evoked by the bandoneón and expressed through on the dancefloor.
  • PofPof, and also known as ‘Popoff’; recorded by Juan D’Arienzo on 23 September 1948; a tango with music composed by Vicente Greco.
  • Rodríguez Peña; recorded by Cambareri on 22 November 1950; a tango with music composed by Vicente Greco in 1911 and lyrics by Ernesto Temes. The name is a reference to the venue where it was first performed, which in turn was named after one of the supporters of independence.
  • Barba De Choclo, meaning ‘Beard Of Corn’; recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 15 September 1952; a tango with music composed by Vicente Greco, first recorded in 1945 or earlier and lyrics by Carlos Pesce.
  • Ojos Negros, meaning ‘Dark Eyes’; recorded by Ánibal Troilo in 1953; a tango with music composed by Vicente Greco in 1917 and lyrics by Ernesto Temes.
  • El Cuzquito, from lunfardo, meaning ‘The Little Dog’; recorded by Firpo’s Cuarteto on 19 August 1954; a tango with music composed by Vicente Greco, first recorded in 1918 and lyrics by José Arolas.
  • Rodríguez Peña; recorded by Orquesta Juan D’Arienzo in 1987; a tango with music composed by Vicente Greco in 1911 and lyrics by Ernesto Temes. The name is a reference to the venue where it was first performed, which in turn was named after one of the supporters of independence.
  • La Viruta, from lunfardo;, from the collection ‘Envasado En Origen’ released in 2001, recorded by Fernandez Fierro in 2001; a tango with music composed by Vicente Greco in 1912 and lyrics by Ernesto Temes. The name is a reference to the strong emotions evoked by the bandoneón and expressed through on the dancefloor.
  • El Cuzquito, from lunfardo, meaning ‘The Little Dog’;, from the collection ‘La Máquina Tanguera’ released in 2003, recorded by Orquesta Típica Imperial in 2003; a tango with music composed by Vicente Greco, first recorded in 1918 and lyrics by José Arolas.
  • El Flete, from lunfardo, meaning ‘The Light Horse’;, from the collection ‘Bien Canyengue’ released in 2006, recorded by La tubatango in 2006; a tango with music composed by Vicente Greco in 1916 and lyrics by Gerónimo Gradito. The name is a reference to the Spanish nautical charge for freighting ‘supercargo’, ie, passengers.

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