Rodolfo Caivano, bandoneonista (I)

2019-04-19 - Rodolfo Caivano in the 2xx studio on 6 April 2019

Rodolfo Caivano first heard tango as his grandmother sang, and then heard it in the bandoneón. Now he has settled in Canberra, but his childhood in Argentina was steeped in music—both folclorico and tango—and this week he talks about the impact of those experiences on his life as a bandoneonista.  That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

  • broadcasting on 2xxfm 98.3 in Canberra,
  • streaming live and also on demand and streaming live from http://www.2xxfm.org.au

Image: Rodolfo Caivano in the 2xx studio on 6 April 2019

PLAYLIST:

  • Francisco Y Francisca, meaning ‘Francisco And Francisca’; recorded by Rodolfo Mederos in 2016; a tango concierto with music composed by Rodolfo Mederos.
  • Lo Qué Vendra, meaning ‘What Will Come’; recorded by Ánibal Troilo on 25 April 1963; a tango with music composed by Astor Piazzolla, first recorded in 1954.
  • Regreso A La Tonada, meaning ‘Return To The Tonada’; recorded by Mercedes Sosa in 1996; a tonada with music composed by Tito Francia and Armando Tejada Gomez.
  • El Matador, meaning ‘The Bull-fighter’, and also known as ‘Matador’; recorded by Los Fabulosos Cadillacs in 1998; a murga-derived piece composed in 1993; authorship not attributed but it is from Los Fabulosos Cadillacs.
  • Sur, meaning ‘South’; recorded live by Rodolfo Caivano at the 2xx studios on 6 April 2019; a tango with music composed by Ánibal Troilo in 1948, and lyrics by Homero Manzi.
  • Bandoneón Arrabalera, meaning ‘Bandoneón Of The Outer Suburbs’; recorded by Victor Lavallen in 2011; a tango with music composed by Bachicha in 1928, and lyrics by Pascual Contursi. The name is a reference to the arrabaleras, the suburbs on the fringe of Buenos Aires in which tango evolved from the milongas and other folk dances.
  • La Ultima Curda, meaning ‘The Last Bender’; recorded live by Rodolfo Caivano at the 2xx studios on 6 April 2019; a tango with music composed by Ánibal Troilo in 1956 and lyrics by Cátulo Castillo and José Razzano. The name is a reference to getting drunk.
  • Gran Hotel Victoria, and also known as ‘Hotel Victoria’; recorded by Quinteto Real in 1963; a tango composed in 1906. The name is a reference to the large hotel of that name at Calle San Martín 133 in the provincial city of Córdoba, on the occasion of extensive renovations in 1906; the hotel is still operating in Córdoba although it moved to a new site at 25 de Mayo 240 in 1914 and the original building has been demolished; no subsequent renovations have been immortalised in tango. Tangos were often written for commercial reasons such as advertising, but this is one of the very few of such tangos to survive. There is doubt about the authorship of both music and lyrics but, like ‘Yunta Brava’ (with which it shares melodic components) it incorporates Spanish folk melodies.

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