Rodolfo Caivano, bandoneonista (II)

2019-05-16 - Just Us Tango - 24 April 2019.jpg

In the second part of this interview Rodolfo Caivano talks about his life as a musician – guitarist and bandoneonista, how it took him from the province of Buenos Aires, to Canberra, and his vision of the future of music.   That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Rodolfo Caivano and the core of his ensemble Just Us Tango, at Smith’s Alternative, Canberra, on 25 April 2019.

PLAYLIST:

  • Fuimos, meaning ‘We Went’; recorded by Néstor Marconi in 2008; a tango with music composed by José Dames in 1945 and lyrics by Homero Manzi.
  • Chiqué, meaning ‘Fancy’, and also known as ‘El Elegante’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 28 May 1953; a tango with music composed by Ricardo Luis Brignolo in 1920 and lyrics by Ricardo Luis Brignolo.
  • Danzarín, meaning ‘Dancer’; recorded live from a performance by Just Us Tango at Smith’s Alternative, Canberra on 25 April 2019; a tango with music composed by Julián Plaza, first recorded in 1958.
  • Comme Il Faut, meaning ‘Quite Alright’, and also known as ‘Como Debe Ser’; recorded live from a performance by Just Us Tango at Smith’s Alternative, Canberra on 25 April 2019; a tango with music composed by Eduardo Arolas, first recorded in 1936 and lyrics by Gabriel Clausi.
  • Como Dos Extraños, meaning ‘Like Two Strangers’; recorded live from a performance by Just Us Tango at Smith’s Alternative, Canberra on 25 April 2019; a tango with music composed by Pedro Laurenz in 1940 and lyrics by José María Contursi.
  • Niebla Del Riachuelo, meaning ‘Fog Of The Riachuelo’, and also known as ‘Nieblas Del Riachuelo’; recorded live from a performance by Rodolfo Caivano at 2XXfm studio on 6 April 2019; a tango with music composed by Juan Carlos Cobián in 1937 and lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo. The name is a reference to the Riachuelo rivulet that flows through Buenos Aires and empties into the sea at La Boca; it is was also known as the Rio De La Matanza, ‘River Of Slaughter’, a reference to the slaughterhouses along it that emptied their waste into it, along with the industrial wastes from tanneries, factories, and shipping; it has been a major public health hazard since the 1860s but as yet no action has actually been taken to remedy it.

 

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