Alex Nodelman, DJ

2019-06-15 - Alex Nodelman with Tango Capital at BASH 2016.jpg

Late last year a series of technical problems interrupted one interview in particular. It was the interview series with Alex Nodelman and, as the technical issues have since been resolved, next edition I am going to replay that interview in its entirety. Together with some great tango for dancing and a quick round-up of some upcoming dance festivals, that’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Alex Nodelman with Tango Capital at Bash 2017.

Live music calendar: Tango.Capital

PLAYLIST:

  • Murió El Malevo, meaning ‘The Ruffian Died’, a tango written by Héctor Varela and recorded by him on 16 June 1953, with lyrics by Carlos Waiss and sung by Rodolfo Lesica.
  • Pasión, meaning ‘Passion’, from Juan D’Arienzo recorded on 2 July 1937 , a vals composed by Alberto Cosentino and with lyrics by Juan Miguel Velich.
  • La Cicatriz, meaning, “The Scar” a milonga from Juan D’Arienzo recorded on 31 October 1939 with Alberto Echagüe singing music and lyrics composed by Raúl Aguirrezabalaga.
  • La Vida Es Corta, meaning ‘The Life Is Short’, from Ricardo Tanturi, recorded on 19 February 1941 with Alberto Castillo singing, a tango also composed by Ricardo Tanturi and with lyrics by Francisco Gorrindo, first recorded in 1930.
  • Mi Romance, from Ricardo Tanturi, recorded on 7 July 1941 with Alberto Castillo singing, a vals composed by José Raúl Iglesias and with lyrics by Juan Bautista Gatti.
  • Mozo Guapo, from Ricardo Tanturi, a milonga recorded on 19 February 1941 with Alberto Castillo singing, composed by Ricardo Tanturi and with lyrics by Eusebio Francisco López.
  • Infamia, meaning ‘Infamy’; a tango recorded by Juan D’Arienzo on 15 December 1941; with music and lyrics composed by Enrique Santos Discépolo in 1939, and sung by Héctor Mauré.
  • Enamorada, meaning ‘Enamoured’; recorded by Juan D’Arienzo on 23 June 1943; a tango with music and lyrics composed by Principe Cubano, first recorded in 1937, and sung by Héctor Mauré.
  • Compadrón; recorded by Juan D’Arienzo on 22 December 1942; with music composed by Luis Nicolas Visca in 1927, lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo, and sung by Héctor Mauré. The name is a reference to one of the ‘compadritos’, the displaced gauchos that drifted to Buenos Aires seeking work.
  • El Olivo, meaning ‘The Olive’; recorded by Juan D’Arienzo on 14 July 1941; a tango with music composed by Antonio Scatasso and Domingo Julio Vivas, first recorded in 1924, lyrics by Carlos Ponciano Cabral, and sung by Héctor Mauré.

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