Tangocentric (2006-2008)

2020-07-02 - Tangocentric - cover of self-titled CD released 2007

The little-heard voices of Roberto Beltran and Carlos Varela, and a glance back at Australian tango band Tangocentric. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: reproduced from the cover of their self-titled CD.

PLAYLIST:

  • Con Alma Y Vida, meaning ‘With Soul And Vigor’; recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 5 July 1945; a milonga with music composed by Carlos Di Sarli, lyrics by Héctor Marcó, and sung by Jorge Durán.
  • Portero, Suba Y Diga, meaning ‘Concierge, Go Up And Say…’; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 28 June 1945; a tango with music composed by Eduardo De Labar in 1928, lyrics by Luis César Amadori, and sung by Roberto Beltrán . She isn’t speaking to him, so he asks the concierge to go up to her apartment and speak on his behalf.
  • Demasiado Tarde, meaning ‘Too Late’; recorded by Edgardo Donato in 1945; a tango with music composed by Francisco Troppoli, first recorded in 1942, lyrics by Agustín Horacio Delamónica, and sung by Roberto Beltrán .
  • Felicia; from the collection ‘Tangocentric’ released in 2007, recorded by Tangocentric in 2007; a tango with music composed by Enrique Saborido, first recorded in 1927 and lyrics by Carlos Mauricio Pacheco. The title is a reference to a woman’s name.
  • Desde El Alma, meaning ‘From The Soul’; from the collection ‘Tangocentric’ released in 2007, recorded by Tangocentric in 2007; a vals with music composed by Rosita Melo, first recorded in 1927 and two sets of lyrics: one by Melo’s husband Victor Piuma Vélez, the other by Homero Manzi in 1947.
  • El Choclo, meaning ‘The Corncob’; from the collection ‘Tangocentric’ released in 2007, recorded by Tangocentric in 2007; a tango with music composed by Ángel Villoldo, first recorded in 1905, lyrics by Enrique Santos Discépolo & Juan Carlos Marambio Catán, and sung by Ben Palumbo. Like many early tangos, this one is risque; the title is a phallic reference.
  • Por Una Cabeza, meaning ‘By A Head’; from the collection ‘Tangocentric’ released in 2007, recorded by Tangocentric in 2007; a cancion with music composed by Carlos Gardel in 1935, lyrics by Alfredo Le Pera, and sung by Ben Palumbo. Written for the Paramount movie ‘Tango Bar’, released in 1935 and starring Carlos Gardel, the name is a reference to a horse losing a race ‘by a head’, with a parallel allusion to the toss of a woman’s head as she attracts the gambler’s attention, inviting him back to try his luck one more time – whether on the track, or in love.
  • Palomita Blanca, meaning ‘Little White Dove’; from the collection ‘Tangocentric’ released in 2007, recorded by Tangocentric in 2007; a tango with music composed by Anselmo A Aieta in 1929 and lyrics by Francisco García Jiménez.
  • Picante, meaning ‘Piquante’; from the collection ‘Tangocentric’ released in 2007, recorded by Tangocentric in 2007; a milonga with music composed by José Luis Padula, first recorded in 1941.
  • Dulce Perdón, meaning ‘Sweet Forgiveness’; recorded by Roberto Firpo on 22 March 1935; a vals with music composed by Roberto Firpo, lyrics by Francisco Brancatti, and sung by Carlos A Varela.
  • A Montmartre, meaning ‘To Montmartre’; recorded by Roberto Firpo on 27 February 1930; a tango with music composed by Enrique Delfino in 1929, lyrics by José González Castillo (Juan de León), and sung by Carlos A Varela. The title is a reference to the district in Paris, for many years the haunt of artists and nightclubs, with tango not very far away.
  • Cero A Cero, meaning ‘Zero To Zero’; recorded by Roberto Firpo on 22 March 1935; a tango with music composed by Roberto Firpo, lyrics by Venancio Clauso, and sung by Carlos A Varela. This song is a statement of love framed as a football metaphor; it became a hit for Carlos Varela and Roberto Firpo because the football crowds took it up.
  • Pena Gaucha, meaning ‘Sad Gaucho Girl’; recorded by Roberto Firpo on 15 April 1935; a tango with music composed by Armando Acquarone, lyrics by Rafael José Velich, and sung by Carlos A Varela and Enrique Forte.   Carlos Varela is singing with Enrique Forte, who was also a violinist from Firpo’s ensemble.
  • Gallo Ciego, from lunfardo, meaning ‘Blind Rooster’; from the collection ‘Tangocentric’ released in 2007, recorded by Tangocentric in 2007; a tango with music composed by Agustín Bardi, first recorded in 1927. It’s a metaphor for deception.

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