Colectivo29 (2010-2012)

2020-08-01 - Colectivo29

Melbourne quintet Coletivo29 featured the driving piano and typey arrangements of Andrew James and this edition features a retrospective of their music as well as an analysis of one of the key influences on the demise of tango dancing, Francisco Rotundo. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Colectivo29; reproduced by permission.

PLAYLIST:

  • Córdobesita, meaning ‘Girl From Córdoba’; recorded by Osvaldo Fresedo on 2 August 1933; a tango with music composed by Pascual Storti, lyrics by Emilio Augusto Oscar Fresedo, and sung by Roberto Ray.
  • El Caburé, from lunfardo, meaning ‘The Ladies’ Man’; recorded by Francisco Rotundo on 1 August 1956; a tango with music composed by Arturo De Bassi, first recorded in 1913.
  • Llorando La Carta, meaning ‘Weeping The Letter’; recorded by Francisco Rotundo on 10 September 1951; a tango with music composed by Juan Fulginiti, first recorded in 1930, lyrics by Juan Fulginiti, and sung by Enrique Campos. The name is a reference to a jilted lover writing through his tears to tell her of his suffering and his forgiveness.
  • Un Infierno, meaning ‘Hell’; recorded by Francisco Rotundo on 14 December 1953; a tango with music composed by Francisco Rotundo in 1953, lyrics by Reinaldo Yiso, and sung by Floreal Ruíz.
  • Carnaval, meaning ‘Carnival’; recorded by Francisco Rotundo on 26 June 1953; a candombe with music composed by Francisco Rotundo & Tití Rossi, lyrics by Pedro Blasco, and sung by Julio Sosa. The name is a reference to the three days of festivities held immediately before Lent in much of South America.
  • Al Fin De Cuentas, meaning ‘At The End Of Accounts’; recorded by Francisco Rotundo on 22 January 1957; a tango with music composed by Enrique Campos, lyrics by Juan Fulginiti, and sung by Enrique Campos. The name is a reference to the confession of a man who murdered the man that seduced his lover.
  • El Aristócrata, meaning ‘The Aristocratic Woman’, and also known as ‘Shusheta’; from the collection ‘Colectivo29’ released in 2011, recorded live from a performance by Colectivo29 at Paris Cat Jazz Club, Melbourne on 19 May 2011; a tango with music composed by Juan Carlos Cobián and lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo.
  • Garúa, meaning ‘Drizzle’; from the collection ‘Colectivo29’ released in 2011, recorded live from a performance by Colectivo30 at Paris Cat Jazz Club, Melbourne on 19 May 2011; a tango with music composed by Ánibal Troilo, first recorded in 1943 and lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo.
  • Gallo Ciego, from lunfardo, meaning ‘Blind Rooster’; from the collection ‘Colectivo29’ released in 2011, recorded live from a performance by Colectivo31 at Paris Cat Jazz Club, Melbourne on 19 May 2011; a tango with music composed by Agustín Bardi, first recorded in 1927. It’s a metaphor for deception.
  • Milonga Del Ángel, meaning ‘Dance Of The Angel’; from the collection ‘Colectivo29’ released in 2011, recorded live from a performance by Colectivo32 at Paris Cat Jazz Club, Melbourne on 19 May 2011; a nuevo with music composed by Astor Piazzolla, first recorded in 1965.
  • Payadora; from the collection ‘Colectivo29’ released in 2011, recorded live from a performance by Colectivo33 at Paris Cat Jazz Club, Melbourne on 19 May 2011; a milonga with music composed by Julián Plaza, first recorded in 1966. The name is a reference to the payadors, the itinerant rap artists from the pampa whose milonga guitar rhythms and improvised verses were the initial seed of tango.
  • Don Agustín Bardi, and also known as ‘A Don Agustín Bardi’; from the collection ‘Colectivo29’ released in 2011, recorded live from a performance by Colectivo34 at Paris Cat Jazz Club, Melbourne on 19 May 2011; a tango with music composed by Horaccio Salgán, first recorded in 1950. The name is a reference to the early tango pianist and composer, Agustín Bardi.
  • Pa’ La Guardia, meaning ‘To The Guard’; from the collection ‘Colectivo29’ released in 2011, recorded live from a performance by Colectivo35 at Paris Cat Jazz Club, Melbourne on 19 May 2011; a tango with music composed by Ernesto Baffa & Antonio Lorenzo Scelza, first recorded in 1959.

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