José Basso – the music

Pianist, orquesta leader, composer, businessman, and game show expert—that was the José Basso introduced in the last episode. This episode features singing with two of his many excellent singers, Floreal Ruiz and Oscar Ferrari—with a little help from Jorge Durán. That’s Tango Capital, Sunday evening from 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

 

2017-10-05 - Jose Basso

PLAYLIST:

  • Venganza, meaning ‘Revenge’; it’s a tango recorded by José Basso on 20 January 1950, music and lyrics by Luis Rubistein, first recorded in 1934 and sung here by Oscar Ferrari.
  • Mi Vieja Viola, meaning ‘My Old Viola’; it’s a tango recorded by José Basso on 17 November 1950, with music composed by Humbero Correa in 1950, lyrics by Humberto Correa and Salvador Frías and sung by Oscar Ferrari.
  • Galleguita, meaning ‘Spanish Girl’; it’s a tango recorded by José Basso on 27 June 1950, with music composed by Horacio Perrorossi in 1924, lyrics by Alfredo Navarrine and sung by Oscar Ferrari.
  • Payada Criolla, meaning ‘Creole Improv’, the name a reference to the rural folk art of spoken and musical improvisation that was one of the early influences on the development of tango; it’s a milonga recorded by José Basso on 17 November 1950, with music composed by José Basso, lyrics by Enrique Maroni and sung by Jorge Durán and Oscar Ferrari.
  • Sábado Inglés, meaning ‘Saturday Holiday’; it’s a tango recorded by José Basso on 9 December 1953, first recorded in 1920 with music composed by Juan Félix Maglio and lyrics by Eugenio Cárdenas.
  • Sentimiento Gaucho, meaning ‘Sentimental Gaucho’; it’s a tango recorded by José Basso on 23 December 1955, with music composed by Francisco Canaro and Rafael Canaro in 1924, lyrics by Juan Andrés Caruso and sung here by Oscar Ferrari.
  • Cuando Muere El Corazón, meaning ‘When The Heart Dies’; it’s a tango recorded by José Basso on 23 December 1955, with music composed by Juan Carlos Bera lyrics by Antonio Chidichimo and sung by Oscar Ferrari.
  • La Maleva, meaning ‘Rough Woman’; it’s a tango recorded by José Basso on 19 April 1955, with music composed by Andonio Buglione in 1922, lyrics by Mario Alberto Pardo and sung by Floreal Ruíz.
  • Y Todavia Te Quiero, meaning ‘I Love You Always’; it’s a tango recorded by José Basso on 11 June 1956, with music composed by Luciano Leocata in 1956, lyrics by Abel Aznar and sung by Floreal Ruíz.
  • A La Mujer Argentina, meaning ‘To An Argentinian Woman’; it’s a tango recorded by José Basso on 26 July 1956, first recorded in 1955 with music composed by Alejandro Romay, lyrics by Roberto Giménez and here sung by Floreal Ruíz.
  • Mundana, meaning ‘Worldly Woman’; it’s a tango recorded by José Basso on 29 November 1956, with music composed by José Basso and Floreal Ruíz, lyrics by Manuel Barros and sung by Floreal Ruíz.
  • El Peluquero, meaning ‘The Barber’; it’s a milonga recorded by José Basso on 21 July 1959, music and lyrics by Alberto Mastra and sung by Floreal Ruíz.
  • Pajaro Azul, meaning ‘Bluebird’; it’s an instrumental tango recorded by José Basso on 8 January 1959, with music composed by Francisco Canaro, first recorded in 1928.
  • Amurado, meaning ‘Left’ (from lunfardo); it’s an tango recorded by José Basso on 8 January 1959, with music composed by Pedro Maffia and Pedro Laurenz in 1926 and lyrics by José Pedro de Grandis.
  • Tu Beso Y Nada Más, meaning ‘Your Kiss And Nothing More’; it’s a tango recorded by José Basso on 14 April 1961, with music composed by Ángel Cabral and José Basso, lyrics by Floreal Ruíz and here sung by Floreal Ruíz.
  • El Viejo Amor, meaning ‘The Old Love’; it’s a tango recorded by José Basso on 18 April 1961, with music composed by José Tinelli, lyrics by Alejandro Romay and sung by Floreal Ruíz.
  • Lo Han Visto Con Otra, meaning ‘They Have Seen Him With Another’; it’s a tango recorded by José Basso on 18 May 1961, first recorded in 1928 with music and lyrics by Horacio Perrorossi, and here sung by Floreal Ruíz.
  • Ronda De Ensueño, meaning ‘Fantasy Circle’; it’s a vals recorded by José Basso on 6 May 1952, with music composed by Iosif Ivanovici, lyrics by Raúl Capablanca, and sung in duet by Jorge Durán and Oscar Ferrari.

 

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