Francisco Amor – the singing

2018-01-11 - Francisco Amor (2)

Last edition looked at the life and times of Francisco Amor, and this edition showcases his singing with Francisco Canaro from 1938 to 1941: that’s Tango Capital this Sunday evening from 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit: http://www.todotango.com/creadores/biografia/917/Francisco-Amor/

PLAYLIST:

  • A La Huacachina, meaning ‘To The Tryst, Maid’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 27 February 1939; a paso doble sung by Francisco Amor. The name is a reference to a word used by indigenous cultures to indicate a meetiing place for lovers; “china” is reference to a young woman of indigenous background.
  • La Zandunga, meaning ‘Celebration’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 30 March 1939; a canción popular mexicana with music composed by Andres Gutierrez, lyrics by Máximo Ramó Ortiz, and sung by Francisco Amor.
  • Las Promesas En Amor, meaning ‘The Promises In Love’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 13 October 1939; a ranchera with music composed by Francisco Canaro, lyrics by Ivo Pelay, and sung by Francisco Amor.
  • Patria Hermana, meaning ‘Beautiful Fatherland’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 11 September 1939; a marcha heroica with music composed by Francisco Canaro, lyrics by Ivo Pelay, and sung by Francisco Amor and Ernesto Famá.
  • Cuartito Azul, meaning ‘Little Blue Room’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 14 September 1939; a tango with music composed by Mariano Mores in 1938, lyrics by Mario Battistella, and sung by Francisco Amor.
  • Salud, Dinero, Y Amor, meaning ‘Health, Wealth, And Love’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 11 September 1939; a vals with music and lyrics composed by Rodolfo Sciammarella in 1939, and sung by Francisco Amor.
  • Cuando Estaba Enamorado, meaning ‘When I Was In Love’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 14 March 1940; a vals with music and lyrics composed by Rodolfo Sciammarella, and sung by Francisco Amor.
  • Melodía Oriental, meaning ‘Eastern Melody’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 16 May 1940; a tango with music composed by Juan Carlos Howard and Roberto Zerrillo, lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo, and sung by Francisco Amor.
  • Pájaro Ciego, meaning ‘Blind Bird’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 22 May 1940; a tango with music composed by Antonio Bonavena, lyrics by Lito Bayardo, and sung by Francisco Amor and Ernesto Famá.
  • El Día Que Te Fuiste, meaning ‘The Day That You Left’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 9 May 1940; a vals with music and lyrics composed by Héctor Lomuto, and sung by Francisco Amor.
  • Muchachita Porteña, meaning ‘Little Girl Of Buenos Aires’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 26 January 1940; a vals with music composed by Mariano Mores, lyrics by Alberto Vacarezza, and sung by Francisco Amor.
  • En Esta Tarde Gris, meaning ‘On This Grey Afternoon’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 9 May 1941; a tango with music composed by Mariano Mores in 1941, lyrics by José María Contursi, and sung by Francisco Amor.
  • Copa De Ajenjo, meaning ‘Cup Of Absinthe’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 19 June 1941; a tango with music composed by Juan Canaro, first recorded in 1930, lyrics by Carlos Pesce, and sung by Francisco Amor.
  • Bajo El Cielo Azul, meaning ‘Under The Blue Sky’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 9 May 1941; a vals criollo with music composed by Francisco Canaro, lyrics by Ivo Pelay, and sung by Francisco Amor.
  • En La Noche Azul, meaning ‘In The Blue Night’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 9 Janaury 1941; a vals with music composed by Francisco Maquiera, lyrics by Juan Carlos Patrón, and sung by Francisco Amor.
  • Lo Que El Viento Se Llevo, meaning ‘Gone With The Wind’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 9 January 1941; a tango with music composed by Roberto Luratti, lyrics by Alfredo Basso, and sung by Francisco Amor.
  • Amor, Amor Veni, meaning ‘Love, Love, Come’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 9 January1 941; a vals with music and lyrics composed by Mariano Ramiro Ochoa Induráin, and sung by Francisco Amor.

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