“Yeites of the Tango Guitar”, with Owen Salome

2018-01-20 - Owen Salome, 28 October 2017

 

There is a discussion of Owen Salome’s presentation on the guitar-playing techniques specific to tango, the interview with Wei-Siong Liang of Launceston continues his observations on linkages between tango and the martial arts, and the double bass player Kicho Díaz features,. That’s Tango Capital, Sunday evening from 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image: Owen Salome, 28 October 2017, at the Sydney Tango House.

PLAYLIST:

  • Milongueando En El Cuarenta, meaning ‘Dancing Tango In The 1940s’; recorded by Anibal Troilo on 26 December 1941; a tango with music composed by Armando Pontier, and sung by .
  • Contrabajisimo, meaning ‘Excellent Double Bass’; from the ‘Hora Cero’ release recorded by Astor Piazzolla in 1985; a concierto with music composed by Astor Piazzolla.
  • Danzarín, meaning ‘Dancer’; recorded by Anibal Troilo on 15 December 1958; a tango with music composed by Julián Plaza.
  • Kicho; recorded by Sexteto Mayor in 1977; a concierto with music composed by Astor Piazzolla, first recorded in 1970. The name is a reference to the double bass player Kicho Díaz.
  • El Irrestistible, meaning ‘The Irresistable’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 9 April 1959; a tango with music composed by Lorenzo Logatti, first recorded in 1931 and lyrics by Carlos Pesce.
  • El Porteñito, meaning ‘The Young Man of Buenos Aires’; from the ‘Hugo Rivas’ release recorded by Hugo Rivas in 2013 with guest artist Luis Salinas; a concierto with music composed by Ángel Villoldo, first recorded in 1924 and lyrics by Carlos Pesce and Antonio Polito.
  • La Cumparsita, meaning ‘The Little March’; recorded by Carlos Gardel on 17 December 1927; a cancion with music composed by Gerado Matos Rodríguez in 1916 and lyrics by Pascual Contursi, Enrique Maroni, and Gerado Matos Rodríguez.
  • Lagrimas Y Sonrisas, meaning ‘Tears And Smiles’; recorded by Juan D’Arienzo on 29 September 1936; a vals with music composed by Pascual De Gullo, first recorded in 1914 and lyrics by Francisco Gullo.

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