Francisco Canaro – the music (well, some of it)

2018-09-06 - Francisco Canaro.jpg

Last edition introduced the life of Francisco Canaro,  and this edition will take a longitudinal look at his music.  That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image credit: “OTS-Canaro” by Archivo General de la Nación. Licensed under Public Domain via Commons – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:OTS-Canaro.jpg#/media/File:OTS-Canaro.jpg

PLAYLIST:

  • La Última Copa, meaning ‘The Last Cup’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 23 March 1927; a tango with music composed by Francisco Canaro in 1925, lyrics by Juan Andrés Caruso, and sung by Agustín Irusta.
  • Nobleza De Arrabal, meaning ‘Nobility Of The Slums’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 29 April 1927; a tango with music composed by Francisco Canaro in 1919 and lyrics by Homero Manzi and Juan Andrés Caruso.
  • La Tablada, meaning ‘The Stock Yards’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 23 December 1929; a tango with music composed by Francisco Canaro, first recorded in 1927.
  • Noches De Amor, meaning ‘Nights Of Love’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 27 July 1927; a vals with music composed by Francisco Canaro.
  • Soñar Y Nada Más, meaning ‘To Hear And Nothing More’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 5 May 1943; a vals with music composed by Francisco Canaro, lyrics by Ivo Pelay, and sung by Eduardo Adrián and Carlos Roldán.
  • Yo No Sé Que Me Han Hecho Tus Ojos, meaning ‘I Know Not What Your Eyes Made Me Do’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 11 March 1953; a vals with music and lyrics composed by Francisco Canaro, first recorded in 1930, and sung by Alberto Arenas and Mario Alonso.
  • Dejame, No Quiero Verte Más, meaning ‘Leave Me, I Do Not Want To See You Any More’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 28 May 1947; a tango with music and lyrics composed by Francisco Canaro, Mariano Mores, and Ivo Pelay in 1936, and sung by Nelly Omar.
  • Te Quiero, meaning ‘I Desire You’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 14 July 1932; a tango with music and lyrics composed by Francisco Canaro in 1932, and sung by Ada Falcón.
  • Mano Brava, meaning ‘Strong Hand’; recorded by Quinteto Pirincho on 22 November 1940; a tango with music composed by Francisco Canaro and Juan Canaro, first recorded in 1918.
  • El Pollito, meaning ‘The Chick’; recorded by Quinteto Pirincho on 31 July 1947; a tango with music composed by Francisco Canaro, first recorded in 1927.
  • El Chamuyo, meaning ‘The Conversation’; recorded by Quinteto Pirincho on 1 August 1950; a tango with music composed by Francisco Canaro, first recorded in 1918.
  • Milonga Criolla, meaning ‘Local Milonga’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 6 October 1936; a milonga with music composed by Francisco Canaro, first recorded in 1927, and sung by Roberto Maida.
  • La Milonga De Buenos Aires, meaning ‘The Milonga Of Buenos Aires’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 9 October 1939; a milonga with music composed by Francisco Canaro, lyrics by Ivo Pelay, and sung by Ernesto Famá.
  • Milongón, meaning ‘Milongón’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 20 June 1938; a milongón with music composed by Francisco Canaro and lyrics by Homero Manzi . The name is a reference to Canaro’s invented new dance rhythm that unfortunately did not take off with the dancing public.
  • El Opio, meaning ‘Opium’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 23 October 1931; a tango with music composed by Francisco Canaro, first recorded in 1931.
  • Café Para Dos, meaning ‘Coffee For Two’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 25 September 1956; a tango with music and lyrics composed by Francisco Canaro, and sung by Guillermo Rici.
  • Adiós, Pampa Mía, meaning ‘Good-bye, My Pampa’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 29 November 1951; a tango with music and lyrics composed by Francisco Canaro, Mariano Mores, and Ivo Pelay in 1945. The name is a reference to the fertile Argentine plains that were the source of much agricultural wealth and which had been mythologised as a bastion of Argentine values and virtues.

 

 

 

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