Tricia Lewis, DJ – take 2

2018-09-14- International tango DJ Tricia Lewis at a milonga in The Netherlands

This week closes the interview with Canberran DJ Tricia Lewis talking further about her international experience of DJing tango, accompanied by a selection of music chose by Tricia. That’s this Sunday on Tango Capital, 7:00pm to 8:00pm:

Image Credit: Tricia Lewis dancing in The Netherlands, by Jacob Braaksma; 2017 –  https://www.facebook.com/jacob.braaksma.9?tn-str=*F

PLAYLIST:

  • Argañaraz; recorded by Ricardo Tanturi on 18 November 1940; a tango with music composed by Roberto Firpo in 1913 and lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo. There is a street named Pasaje Gral F Argañaraz in Buenos Aires, suggesting that the song is named for one of the heros of the wars of independence; a less likely reference is to Francisco de Argañaraz y Murguía, who in 1593 founded the first Spanish settlement in Jujuy province, a province that was the site of important battles during those wars as the Spanish fought from Peru. Alternatively the song may be named for the locality around the street in Buenos Aires, perhaps with a bar in which some people met. The historical context is supported by the clear reference in the lyrics to the Afro-Argentine Bernardo Monteagudo, an important figure in the shaping of Argentina’s independence, but overall the lyrics are a wistful reflection on a long-gone social environment in Buenos Aires (the second verse clearly describes the urban dance of tango canyengue) and so do not help resolve the origin of the title as they were written around 1930 under a different title—Aquellos Farras, meaning ‘Those Things’.
  • Didí; recorded by Rodolfo Biagi on 21 October 1941; a tango with music composed by Roberto Firpo, first recorded in 1915.
  • Pa’ Qué Seguir, meaning ‘To Follow’; recorded by Miguel Caló on 19 January 1943; a tango with music composed by Francisco Fiorentino, first recorded in 1942, lyrics by Pedro Lloret, and sung by Jorge Ortiz.
  • La Milonga De Mis Perros, meaning ‘The Milonga Of My Dogs’; recorded by Francisco Canaro on 22 April 1942; a milonga with music composed by Francisco Canaro, lyrics by Ivo Pelay, and sung by Carlos Roldán.
  • La Mulateada, meaning ‘The Mulatto Woman’; recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 20 November 1941; a milonga with music composed by Julio Eduardo Del Puerto, lyrics by Carlos Pesce, and sung by Roberto Rufino.
  • El Puntazo, meaning ‘The Wound’; recorded by Juan D’Arienzo on 13 August 1952; a tango with music composed by Alejandro Junnissi.
  • Viviani; recorded by Carlos Di Sarli on 19 December 1956; a tango with music composed by Roberto Firpo, first recorded in 1920.
  • El Rey Del Compás, meaning ‘The King Of The Beat’; recorded by Juan D’Arienzo on 12 September 1941; a tango with music and lyrics composed by Príncipe Cubano, first recorded in 1939.
  • Pobre Flor, meaning ‘Poor Flower’; recorded by Alfredo De Angelis on 7 January 1946; a vals with music composed by Luis Mottolese, first recorded in 1932, lyrics by Victor Spindola, and sung by Carlos Dante and Julio Martel.
  • La Shunca; recorded by Edgardo Donato on 21 January 1941; a vals with music composed by Lorenzo Barcelata, lyrics by Ernesto Cortázar, and sung by Horacio Lagos, Lita Morales, and Romeo Gavioli.
  • 24 De Agosto, meaning ’24th Of August’; recorded by Pedro Laurenz on 16 April 1943; a tango with music composed by Pedro Laurenz, lyrics by Homero Manzi, and sung by Alberto Podestá. The date of 24 August in the name is not significant; it is simply a date, in the context of the song the date that his wife left him because of his violence.
  • A Roberto Peppe, meaning ‘To Roberto Peppe’; recorded by Osvaldo Pugliese on 20 March 1956; a tango with music composed by Estban Enique Gilardi. The name is a reference to Pugliese’s bandoneonista, from 1951 until his death on 29 November 1955.

 

 

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